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    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    Not sure what that is, but honestly it isn't necessary. If an employer is interested in your being able to speak German, they won't see that you stopped at A level and immediately think Hm, can they really speak German though? I want further proof. Including it on your job application is sufficient !

    Nonetheless, if you do have the burning desire to obtain such a qualification as further proof then by all means go for it if you're capable. It won't make you any less suitable for a job after all !
    Okay, and again, thank you for the advice!
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    This might be really controversial, but if you don't get an A* in French - don't take it as an A-level.
    I disagree with that. I got an A at GCSE and got nearly full UMS last year at AS. I know an A is still good, but your GCSE grade in no way defines your suitability for A level French. Correct me if I'm wrong but all I remember doing at GCSE was writing controlled assessments, getting them corrected and learning them. Other than that, there was the reading and listening exams which aren't really anything to go on.

    In the absolute majority of cases, a student won't go straight from GCSE to A level French with any real skills in the language. If you put the average A/A*-grade GCSE French student in a room with French people who don't speak English, they wouldn't be able to have any kind of conversation unless one of the French people wondered what the GCSE student habitually eats for breakfast, dinner and tea.

    Point being, if you're genuinely interested in French then A level is a great opportunity to improve your skills. Someone with a B at GCSE who has a genuine passion for French will generally do well, better even than someone who got an A/A* who takes French just because they believe they're 'good' at it. This is the case of most A level French students, they think they'll do swimmingly at A level just because they did well at GCSE, though they don't actually enjoy French half as much as their other subjects. This ultimately results in lots of people being advised not to take it which shouldn't be so.

    Sorry for that long post, that's just my reflection on the matter.
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    French is bae.


    you gottta know your stuff though,cant get away with not learning tenses properly/vocab but otherwise i love it
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    I found it ridiculously hard, and I'm by no means an idiot. I too love French and have a huge passion for it. Being bi-lingual I find languages fairly easy to learn. However, I achieved an A* at GCSE, then got a D at A level. In all honesty if I had worked harder it would have been easier, but that would mean practising at least 4 times a week which is unrealistic.
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    Languages are a great thing to have under your belt, and provided you did well at GCSE I think A Level French is a great way to relax from other more intense subjects. But A level languages can go either very well (e.g. for me) or not very well (e.g. for the most of my class lol).

    Make sure before you start Year 12 you're confident with the grammar you were taught and GCSE and are ready to push yourself. The thing with language A levels is that there is no end to the learning in a language. With something like Maths, you can learn how to answer questions in the set syllabus topics, and that is it. A language is something you constantly develop through all of your life. That's why it's important to have a passion for languages, practise your French regularly outside of class and it should be a walk in the park to do well at the exams. But that's just from my experience at AS Level.

    Something that a lot of people fall victim to (at GCSE and AS level in my experience) is expecting the teacher to teach them everything. But really you have to go and memorise that stuff yourself! Sure they can make you aware of the stuff you need to know to score points in the exam, but you can't wait for your teacher to remind you of that specific tense or whatever every time you encounter it in life. And it's just annoying when they ask the teacher to explain it for the fifth time. (How many times do I have to sit through an explanation of present participles... /rant)

    In my opinion, it's a fun subject that I don't even count as a proper subject sometimes, because I learn French outside of class on my own anyway. Just treat your lessons as just another way to practise your French, you know? I know this was all just rambling but maybe you'll find something useful here. The bottom line is, take French if you want and are determined to learn French, and not if you just want to fill up your fourth AS option!
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    Currently studying A2 French, found the jump to AS pretty much non existent as you basically just learn the same topics apart from the speaking which I found much harder. However I have found the jump to A2 pretty huge.
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    (Original post by alicereynolds)
    Currently studying A2 French, found the jump to AS pretty much non existent as you basically just learn the same topics apart from the speaking which I found much harder. However I have found the jump to A2 pretty huge.
    I'm doing A2 French atm and I'm not finding it that much harder. For me it's just more boring because of the cultural topic. :bawling:

    At least the more "high brow" topics like feminism and poverty means the conversations are a bit more engaging than in Year 12.
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    (Original post by AW97)
    I found it ridiculously hard, and I'm by no means an idiot. I too love French and have a huge passion for it. Being bi-lingual I find languages fairly easy to learn. However, I achieved an A* at GCSE, then got a D at A level. In all honesty if I had worked harder it would have been easier, but that would mean practising at least 4 times a week which is unrealistic.
    I did say in an earlier post that you need to have a passion for a language to succeed at A level, but I think, in reality, more is required than just passion and interest. You need to be willing to put work in and to learn things that the average French teenager doesn't even know themselves (namely advanced grammar like the subjunctive across different tenses). Doing AS French confirmed that I wouldn't study French at University, because I just found that, although I love the language and hope to become fluent in the future and take advantage of this, actually studying it at A level took my interest out of the language. I don't think that if I went to France and tried to speak to people, that I'd be inclined to use the past historic or the imperfect subjunctive.


    As for practice, yes that is required to be able to improve. However, just attempting to speak French as much as possible in class time suffices. At my college there is a French assistant who we have a 25 minute speaking class with every other week, but other than that I'm not exposed to French outside the class except for homework, and I'm doing fine, got an A at AS. Nothing to worry about if you have no one to practice with.

    (Original post by Nijuuninichi)
    I'm doing A2 French atm and I'm not finding it that much harder. For me it's just more boring because of the cultural topic. :bawling:

    At least the more "high brow" topics like feminism and poverty means the conversations are a bit more engaging than in Year 12.
    What do you mean by cultural topic? I know that the syllabus is different across the boards, but I'm studying two films this year and it's so much better than last year I actually really like the films too which is a bonus

    Personally I can't say I've been interested in any of the topics at A level But I agree the A2 topics such as immigration are much easier to speak about than the AS topics
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    (Original post by nverjvlev)
    The problem with trying to do French outside of a school is that you won't get a chance to talk in French to other people much - this is key to learning to speak spontaneously. If you really want to do well at this I suggest you listen to the french news (you can do this online) at least once a week and find someone who speaks very good french to talk about your topics to for at least an hour a week in total. You could do this on skype or you could contact a high school near you and make friends with a year 13 student? The AS topics are quite similar to GCSE -music, celebrity culture, holidays, health etc, the A2 topics are a little different - nuclear energy, restorative justice, immigration, history, literature etc.
    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    Oh okay, would you really be able to get your French up to A level standard being home schooled?

    And because the most part of people who study A levels go on to apply to university, and universities only give out offers based on three A levels, so in terms of educational progress you're not doing yourself any favors by studying 2 extra A levels, if anything that would just hinder your progress being as your French is very basic so that subject would require ridiculous amounts of travail.
    I've considered everything you guys have been saying and I suppose I agree, it would be taking too much onto my plate and it's unnecessary. Although I really do enjoy french and would like to practice it again so I suppose I wouldn't do an A-level on it but I'd like to take it up as an interest on the side to study french ! Thanks for your inputs It was very helpful.
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    (Original post by Nijuuninichi)
    I'm doing A2 French atm and I'm not finding it that much harder. For me it's just more boring because of the cultural topic. :bawling:

    At least the more "high brow" topics like feminism and poverty means the conversations are a bit more engaging than in Year 12.
    I'm not really finding the listening, reading etc harder it's just the more complicated vocab and stuff I guess. But yeh it's actually so boring so many that's why I'm finding it harder cos I can't actually be bothered to do anything!
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    Have you thought about any other subjects perhaps?
    I've thought about History, Classical Civilisation and English Lit? Do you know anything about them?


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    (Original post by Allymcdermott)
    I've thought about History, Classical Civilisation and English Lit? Do you know anything about them?


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    My advice is to pick the subject(s) you are genuinely most interested in. If you'd rather extend your knowledge on how we came to be than learn in more detail how to analyse literature and poetry then pick History over English Literature. If tu as envie de work on your French and reach a reasonable standard at which you can semi-comfortably converse with a native, take French.
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    (Original post by alicereynolds)
    I'm not really finding the listening, reading etc harder it's just the more complicated vocab and stuff I guess. But yeh it's actually so boring so many that's why I'm finding it harder cos I can't actually be bothered to do anything!
    I'm sure we'll both be fine... Eventually. To be honest, I'm finding it about the same level of boring as AS, maybe a little more at A2. AS was doing GCSE topics over again while A2 is depressing real world topics. Both are useful for vocab though, you have to admit.

    (Original post by beyknowles2)
    What do you mean by cultural topic? I know that the syllabus is different across the boards, but I'm studying two films this year and it's so much better than last year I actually really like the films too which is a bonus

    Personally I can't say I've been interested in any of the topics at A level But I agree the A2 topics such as immigration are much easier to speak about than the AS topics
    I'm studying AQA, how about you? The cultural topic refers to studying a film and/or book. We're doing both in my class unfortunately.

    I think at first the topics are quite interesting. But when you've done about five lessons in a row on poverty it does tend to drag a bit. But it is fun to see what your classmates believe - we started feminism last lesson, so we went around and explained in French why we were/were not feminists. Now I feel like I have top secret information.
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    (Original post by Nijuuninichi)
    I'm sure we'll both be fine... Eventually. To be honest, I'm finding it about the same level of boring as AS, maybe a little more at A2. AS was doing GCSE topics over again while A2 is depressing real world topics. Both are useful for vocab though, you have to admit.



    I'm studying AQA, how about you? The cultural topic refers to studying a film and/or book. We're doing both in my class unfortunately.

    I think at first the topics are quite interesting. But when you've done about five lessons in a row on poverty it does tend to drag a bit. But it is fun to see what your classmates believe - we started feminism last lesson, so we went around and explained in French why we were/were not feminists. Now I feel like I have top secret information.
    Ah yes we are studying a film and a book too, well the rest of my class are doing a book, I chose to do an extra film by myself instead as doing a book would kill me

    J'avoue que I hate the lessons, I do all of my notes at home so I don't really get any benefit from the 2 hour French lessons which is annoying
 
 
 
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