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    (Original post by RayApparently)
    I thank my right honourable friend for his congratulations and extend my own public congratulations on his ascension to to leader of party.

    I direct him to my previous answers.
    Thank you.


    PS: Loving that response to Aph's question
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    I thank the prime minister for ending the game which labour outlawed pre-great repeal Mk.II.

    As a follow up question, as I am sure the right honourable Prime minister knows what you mix yellow and red you get orange. As such how does he plan on stopping the orange bookers taking control of government and does he worry that being in coalition with the liberals will drag him right?
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    What are the government's plans regarding the ongoing surge of economic migrants into Europe? Approximately 10,000 people enter the EU each day – a trend that is by all means unsustainable and potentially destructive to the European way of life.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    What are the government's plans regarding the ongoing surge of economic migrants into Europe? Approximately 10.000 people enter the EU each day – a trend that is by all means unsustainable
    Source?

    and potentially destructive to the European way of life.
    And, uh, source?
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    (Original post by TheDefiniteArticle)
    Source?



    And, uh, source?
    Unless you've been living in a cave for the past four months, it's the figures commonly cited by the local media. As for the world media, the NY Times reports 10,000 migrants per day at the heigh of the crisis, the AP mentions that “nearly 170,000 migrants crossed Slovenia since mid-October when Hungary closed its border with Croatia and the flow was redirected to Slovenia” (do the math; that's only the route through Slovenia), and the Telegraph cites multiple shocking statistics provided by the EU, including the estimate of three million migrants potentially due to come by the end of 2016.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    Unless you've been living in a cave for the past four months, it's the figures commonly cited by the local media. As for the world media, the NY Times reports 10,000 migrants per day at the heigh of the crisis, the AP mentions that “nearly 170,000 migrants crossed Slovenia since mid-October when Hungary closed its border with Croatia and the flow was redirected to Slovenia” (do the math; that's only the route through Slovenia), and the Telegraph cites multiple shocking statistics provided the EU, including the estimate of three million migrants potentially due to come by the end of 2016.

    And, uh, nice passive-aggressive tone, ****. :yy:
    I'm asking for a source to suggest that this is unsustainable, that a 'European way of life' exists, and that the immigration would be destructive to that way of life. All of these are controversial propositions.
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    No question for His Highness The Prime Minister.

    But Mr Speaker, the proper way of abbreviating 'right honourable' is actually 'Rt Hon.'. There's a full stop after 'Hon.' but nothing after 'Rt' as 'Rt' is the first letter with the final letter, and nothing after it. This is the same reason why 'Mr', 'Ms', 'Dr', 'Bt' etc are abbreviated without a full stop in proper British English. It's American to have a full stop after 'Mr.', 'Ms.', 'Dr.' etc.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    No question for His Highness The Prime Minister.

    But Mr Speaker, the proper way of abbreviating 'right honourable' is actually 'Rt Hon.'. There's a full stop after 'Hon.' but nothing after 'Rt' as 'Rt' is the first letter with the final letter, and nothing after it. This is the same reason why 'Mr', 'Ms', 'Dr', 'Bt' etc are abbreviated without a full stop in proper British English. It's American to have a full stop after 'Mr.', 'Ms.', 'Dr.' etc.
    I disagree with the need for a full stop after any shortened words. Using the topical example of David Cameron's letter, there is no full stop after any word on the official HoC MP heading for letters.

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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    No question for His Highness The Prime Minister.

    But Mr Speaker, the proper way of abbreviating 'right honourable' is actually 'Rt Hon.'. There's a full stop after 'Hon.' but nothing after 'Rt' as 'Rt' is the first letter with the final letter, and nothing after it. This is the same reason why 'Mr', 'Ms', 'Dr', 'Bt' etc are abbreviated without a full stop in proper British English. It's American to have a full stop after 'Mr.', 'Ms.', 'Dr.' etc.
    PRSOM :fuhrer:

    Most style guides would agree with this. If the abbreviation does not include the last letter, it needs a full stop, if it does include the last letter it does not. (And if, like for metric units, it's a symbol and not an abbreviation, no full stop is ever used.)
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    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    PRSOM :fuhrer:

    Most style guides would agree with this. If the abbreviation does not include the last letter, it needs a full stop, if it does include the last letter it does not. (And if, like for metric units, it's a symbol and not an abbreviation, no full stop is ever used.)
    Fez of Secretary for Grammar. :fuhrer:
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    I disagree with the need for a full stop after any shortened words. Using the topical example of David Cameron's letter, there is no full stop after any word on the official HoC MP heading for letters.

    Parliamentary use actually is inconsistent:
    http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-a...ys-government/

    I'd agree with not using a full stop at all but having one after 'Hon' does make sense as long as the use is consistent throughout with other words. This means if you use 'Hon.', you should use 'e.g.', 'P.S.', 'N.B.' etc. But not having a full stop is generally more British: BBC, MP, Lond, MBBS, MSc, DPhil, No etc.
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Parliamentary use actually is inconsistent:
    http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-a...ys-government/

    I'd agree with not using a full stop at all but having one after 'Hon' does make sense as long as the use is consistent throughout with other words. This means if you use 'Hon.', you should use 'e.g.', 'P.S.', 'N.B.' etc. But not having a full stop is generally more British: BBC, MP, Lond, MBBS, MSc, DPhil, No etc.
    I think there's some difference to do with whether a word is abbreviated to a single letter or to multiple letters.

    Having had a quick Google it seems there is, though I would argue the examples in point 4 do not tally with the vast majority of actual English usage.
    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/wo...-abbreviations
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    (Original post by Little Toy Gun)
    Parliamentary use actually is inconsistent:
    http://www.parliament.uk/mps-lords-a...ys-government/

    I'd agree with not using a full stop at all but having one after 'Hon' does make sense as long as the use is consistent throughout with other words. This means if you use 'Hon.', you should use 'e.g.', 'P.S.', 'N.B.' etc. But not having a full stop is generally more British: BBC, MP, Lond, MBBS, MSc, DPhil, No etc.
    I cannot find any Parliamentary use where a full stop is included but plenty without. I believe the MHoC modelling the British legislative body is reason to make a special effort to use British English. I was always taught phrases like e.g. are exceptional because they are directly taken from a foreign language, meaning the full stop must be added in accordance with the grammatical rules of that language; this is not the case for MP which is an English construction.
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    (Original post by Nigel Farage MEP)
    I cannot find any Parliamentary use where a full stop is included but plenty without. I believe the MHoC modelling the British legislative body is reason to make a special effort to use British English. I was always taught phrases like e.g. are exceptional because they are directly taken from a foreign language, meaning the full stop must be added in accordance with the grammatical rules of that language; this is not the case for MP which is an English construction.
    In the link I posted, you can see: The Rt Hon. the Baroness Stowell of Beeston MBE (Con) and The Rt Hon. the Baroness Anelay of St Johns DBE (Con). This seems to suggest that 'Hon.' is the old-fashioned way of doing it.

    Oxford's style guide advises against 'e.g.' but 'eg' so there's really no difference.
    (Original post by Saracen's Fez)
    I think there's some difference to do with whether a word is abbreviated to a single letter or to multiple letters.Having had a quick Google it seems there is, though I would argue the examples in point 4 do not tally with the vast majority of actual English usage.http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/wo...-abbreviations
    No, I don't think people use 'Dec.' either.

    Whether it's to a single letter or to multiple letters is irrelevant: You don't put a full stop after 'MP' or 'MSt'.

    As I've said, I personally wouldn't say 'Hon.', but I don't see that as something that's 'wrong'. If you use 'e.g.' there's reason why you cannot use it consistently in other places, especially when many words are not original English words to begin with. It'd be very odd to say 'I've attended UCL and U.N.A.M.' when they are both abbreviations for universities, just one in English and the other in Spanish. And if abbreviations in foreign languages have to have a full stop, it'd be 'Oxon.' instead of 'Oxon', which is just not what people use.

    This is without saying that It's not necessarily 'un-British' to use 'Hon.' when famous writers such as JRR Tolkien wrote his name J. R. R. Tolkien:
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    Surely the difference between Hon. and MP is that Hon. is an abbreviation whereas MP are initials of the words.
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