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How much better is life for "rich" kids? watch

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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    I would not agree tbh. I'd rather have a life of things than just wants/desires. Money gives a sense of comfort.

    .
    Money gives a sense of comfort up to a point. Once your basic needs are met it's very much a case of diminishing returns and hedonic adaptation.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    I think it massively depends on how big of a money gap we are talking about.
    I totally agree, for all the reasons you've listed. Once someone's basic needs are met, I doubt there's any major differences.

    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    However this doesn't take into account mental health problems across incomes or other things such as the fact often the much higher earners don't get to spend as much time with their children as lower earners, which can defintely affect a child
    This is something I've come across a few times, particularly with the Americans I've known and worked with.

    One of my old colleagues used to commute 2.5 hour each way to work. He left before the kids had woken up and wasn't back until they were in bed. I asked him why he done it and he said it was so that his children would have "a better quality of life"...
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    Define rich.

    Every person you ask will have a subjective view on what define rich. My father earns around 120k a year, and gets numerous great perks for his company. Does that make us rich? Compared to my peers at school it does, but we're measly peasants compared to a substantial amount of other people we know. cha feel
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    Depends totally on the parents.
    There are those who will attempt to substitute presents for presence, but ultimately this will result in a less well rounded individual.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    hear hear!
    Do you favour the inequality this breeds?
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    My dad makes insane amounts of money, it cost more for me to be in 1st grade than a year at uni here, and my childhood still sucked ass. Just because parents make a bunch of money doesn't mean they should be parents, mine went through a messy divorce where my dad didn't want to support us and so even when we got to go to his "nice" house and "nice" car, there wasn't any joy. My cousins parents were even richer, but they all came from even worsely (made that word up) broken homes so while they got whatever they wanted in terms of clothes or gadgets or whatever, a lot of them are broken inside.

    This isn't to say "boohoo evry1 cri 4 meh" because I'm fine with my life, but seriously I don't understand the attitude in this country that EVERYONE from a somewhat better financial background is automatically a snob who was airlifted to school, has 3 maids to help them put on clothes, and doesn't know how to pronounce "charades" without sounding like a douche. There's good and bad in every circle
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    How much better is life for "rich" kids?

    Considering now the government is making a lot more cut backs in government spending such as schools, nhs etc.

    Will we begin to see a more noticeable difference like in the US for example over time.
    I just came in to say money doesnt buy happiness, it just buys distraction from unhappiness.
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    I wish I was rich I wanna go
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    (Original post by ImNotReallyMe)
    Do you favour the inequality this breeds?
    Well if it's natural - Yes.
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    Depends what the money is spent on. My dad earns a lot (enough to send me and my 3 siblings to expensive private schools), but because he spends nearly £100,000 on school fees each year, we don't live what people would think is a stereotypically 'rich' lifestyle with expensive cars or a huge mansion etc. I don't feel particularly much more well off than my friends. I think if you're living on the poverty line then yeah, things will be hard, but I don't think being rich is any better than being middle class.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I totally agree, for all the reasons you've listed. Once someone's basic needs are met, I doubt there's any major differences.



    This is something I've come across a few times, particularly with the Americans I've known and worked with.

    One of my old colleagues used to commute 2.5 hour each way to work. He left before the kids had woken up and wasn't back until they were in bed. I asked him why he done it and he said it was so that his children would have "a better quality of life"...
    Yeah it's quite sad I didn't see my mum all that much when I was little since she worked so much. But it got better once I got a bit older as I spent time at her work while she working (basically grew up in a pub, loved it ).
    I can imagine it's very hard on those the parents and the children.
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    PS Reviewer
    I used to think "well of course their life is better if their family has more money" but the older I get and the more I hear of/interact with rich kids, the more I see that they still can have **** lives - it's just a different kinda ****! :yep:

    Like take the kids my mum teaches for example (she's a peripatetic piano teacher in a wealthy London prep school, as one of her jobs). The parents of these kids seem to oscillate between being ridiculously pushy or borderline neglectful. There doesn't seem to be any middle ground. Guess the Beatles were right when they sang "money can't buy me love"

    Or take the private school kids with ****-rich families who pay extortionate amounts to have me give their kids tailored Oxbridge interview prep. Some of them are very clever and will get into Oxbridge, granted. Equally, some of them really won't get into Oxbridge (money can't buy common sense, raw intelligent or potential) and yet their/their parents' dreams are pinned on the idea that they WILL definitely get in. It's a lot of pressure to be under, I guess. Plus some of the private schools I go into to give this interview prep have poor pastoral care
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Yes, handing control back to family patriarchs. Better make sure you're born into a rich family with caring parents!
    They didn't become rich through magic. It took generations of thrift, humility and good morality to achieve it.

    Poor people live an unfortunate life but it's the fault of their ancestors.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I totally agree, for all the reasons you've listed. Once someone's basic needs are met, I doubt there's any major differences.



    This is something I've come across a few times, particularly with the Americans I've known and worked with.

    One of my old colleagues used to commute 2.5 hour each way to work. He left before the kids had woken up and wasn't back until they were in bed. I asked him why he done it and he said it was so that his children would have "a better quality of life"...
    When I hear things like this, I always wonder if it's really any better for poor families where both parents are working long hours to meet basic needs.

    Also, for every wildly overworking, hyper-aspirational parent there is another parent with solid means from old money who has time to look after their children well and also be rich. It's a very mixed picture at the upper levels of society. Not every affluent family derives their money from city traders or upper echelon managers, nor are all spouses working. However, it does seem to increasingly be true that high income often equals prolonged working hours for many.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    They didn't become rich through magic. It took generations of thrift, humility and good morality to achieve it.

    Poor people live an unfortunate life but it's the fault of their ancestors.
    Thrift, humility and good morality are traits I for one associate with the poor, not the rich. The rich, especially new money, are wasteful, hubristic and amoral.
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Thrift, humility and good morality are traits I for one associate with the poor, not the rich. The rich, especially new money, are wasteful, hubristic and amoral.
    whoaaaaaa

    all sorts of "rich" out there tbh. From your lottery winner, to your basic entrepreneur to your old landed gentry etc.
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    (Original post by Bill_Gates)
    whoaaaaaa

    all sorts of "rich" out there tbh. From your lottery winner, to your basic entrepreneur to your old landed gentry etc.
    I'm trolling really dw
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    (Original post by scrotgrot)
    Thrift, humility and good morality are traits I for one associate with the poor, not the rich. The rich, especially new money, are wasteful, hubristic and amoral.
    That's what atheism gets you. But regardless, the poor are vastly more immoral than anyone else. They deserve what they get, mostly. Not their children, but c'est la vie. Their parents should've thought about them more.
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    (Original post by Fullofsurprises)
    When I hear things like this, I always wonder if it's really any better for poor families where both parents are working long hours to meet basic needs.

    Also, for every wildly overworking, hyper-aspirational parent there is another parent with solid means from old money who has time to look after their children well and also be rich. It's a very mixed picture at the upper levels of society. Not every affluent family derives their money from city traders or upper echelon managers, nor are all spouses working. However, it does seem to increasingly be true that high income often equals prolonged working hours for many.
    Here are some really easy easy ways to work your way up from "only meeting basic needs."

    1. Don't have children before the father has a skill.
    2. The mother should learn skills like cooking, making clothes and housekeeping so that no money needs to be wasted on simple stuff that can be home-made or home done.
    3. Never drink alcohol or smoke.
    4. Never eat junk food.
    5. Don't get divorced or separate.
    6. Don't watch TV. Watch football matches online or play in local leagues.
    7. Don't buy your child an Apple product.
    8. Keep a stern eye on your children. Keep them away from loose women and horny guys. Send them to single sex schools where they won't be distracted.
    9. Take them to a religious institution that teaches them the virtues of self-discipline and the importance of morality and the perils of morally reductionist relativism.

    You'll find that breaking basic rules of morality is the reason that the vast majority of poor are poor. I have little pity for them. They deserve what they get.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    That's what atheism gets you. But regardless, the poor are vastly more immoral than anyone else. They deserve what they get, mostly. Not their children, but c'est la vie. Their parents should've thought about them more.
    Why is that so? If you are a Christian, poorer people live a far more communitarian life, in keeping with Christian morality about sharing and the family, than everyone else.
 
 
 
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