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The school where lessons start at 1.30pm watch

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  • View Poll Results: Around what time should school lessons start?
    7am
    94
    7.11%
    9am
    643
    48.60%
    11am
    525
    39.68%
    1pm
    61
    4.61%

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    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    I'm suggesting that the emphasis children place on education outside of school (and to a lesser extent inside of school), is derived largely from the values their parents instil in them.

    Contrasting the work-ethic of British children and Chinese children, for example, attests to that. Most parents in the UK do not do much, in my experience, to encourage their children to work outside of school, and as the government has limited control over bad parents (in this sense), the best alternative is to make the most of the time that children spend at school.
    Okay, yes I agree. I thought you were referring to parents not encouraging children to join extra activities outside of school on weekends and weekdays and calling that bad parenting. I don't know why I read it like that.

    And yes some parents really don't care, but similarly there are parents who do try to enforce discipline onto children and fail miserably because the children don't care. I mean there is only so much a parent can do, children need to take responsibility as well for their education.
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    Okay, yes I agree. I thought you were referring to parents not encouraging children to join extra activities outside of school on weekends and weekdays and calling that bad parenting. I don't know why I read it like that.
    Extra-curricular activities would be good too, but not as essential as encouraging them to focus on their education.

    And yes some parents really don't care, but similarly there are parents who do try to enforce discipline onto children and fail miserably because the children don't care. I mean there is only so much a parent can do, children need to take responsibility as well for their education.
    Hm, I think I generally disagree with you there. From a young age children are very malleable. For sure there are exceptions, but if you can't encourage your children to take their education seriously then that probably stems from bad parenting from an early age. Sadly we live in a society where we think everyone has an equal right to be a parent. Being a parent entails certain responsibilities, and we should acknowledge that not everyone is equally capable of fulfilling those responsibilities (thus not fit to be a parent). Digressing slightly from the thread topic here, though.
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    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    Extra-curricular activities would be good too, but not as essential as encouraging them to focus on their education.


    Hm, I think I generally disagree with you there. From a young age children are very malleable. For sure there are exceptions, but if you can't encourage your children to take their education seriously then that probably stems from bad parenting from an early age. Sadly we live in a society where we think everyone has an equal right to be a parent. Being a parent entails certain responsibilities, and we should acknowledge that not everyone is equally capable of fulfilling those responsibilities (thus not fit to be a parent). Digressing slightly from the thread topic here, though.
    No I do agree with you, it's true. If you don't discipline your children from a young age it will probably be much harder as they get older.

    And definitely, not everyone is fit to be a parent. I have seen some horrid examples of 'parenting' before e.g a mother at the bus stop aggressively telling her 2ish(?) year old to shut up! whilst conversing with her friends, when clearly the child was uncomfortable and practically falling out the pram
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    No I do agree with you, it's true. If you don't discipline your children from a young age it will probably be much harder as they get older.
    I also disapprove of the use of violence against children. I could never physically discipline my child unless I really had to. I just think that there is always a better alternative than violence, and if you have to use violence against your own child to teach them something then you are probably not that great a parent. Although I am mindful that I have here essentially insulted the parenting skills of every parent that has used violence against their children (although only where it was not necessary - which is subjective).

    And definitely, not everyone is fit to be a parent. I have seen some horrid examples of 'parenting' before e.g a mother at the bus stop aggressively telling her 2ish(?) year old to shut up!whilst conversing with her friends, when clearly the child was uncomfortable and practically falling out the pram
    Does that not make sense, or am I being dim? But I got what you were saying, regardless, and agree.
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    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    I also disapprove of the use of violence against children. I could never physically discipline my child unless I really had to. I just think that there is always a better alternative than violence, and if you have to use violence against your own child to teach them something then you are probably not that great a parent. Although I am mindful that I have here essentially insulted the parenting skills of every parent that has used violence against their children (although only where it was not necessary - which is subjective).
    I don't completely disapprove of violence being used as a form of discipline. But there are limits and boundaries that mustn't be crossed, you can say that is subjective, but I think any sane person would know if your leaving bruises and blood on a child that it is a form of abuse rather than discipline.

    I was at the airport this summer and I saw a father who had luggage in his hands walking out, and his child started misbehaving as they were walking and he slapped him on his arm and the child stopped instantly. You could say he could have used words but in that moment it was clearly easier to let the child know what he was doing wrong with an action rather than stopping in the middle of an airport with all the luggage in his hands. I just wouldn't call that bad parenting.

    We can't really judge parenting since we are not parents and we don't know what it's like. But from my experience I don't think it's wrong to slap a child when misbehaving, that doesn't mean it should be the only form of discipline, you should be telling your child what they did wrong so don't repeat the behaviour too.


    Does that not make sense, or am I being dim? But I got what you were saying, regardless, and agree.
    What didn't make sense to you?
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    (Original post by TheonlyMrsHolmes)
    I was at the airport this summer and I saw a father who had luggage in his hands walking out, and his child started misbehaving as they were walking and he slapped him on his arm and the child stopped instantly. You could say he could have used words but in that moment it was clearly easier to let the child know what he was doing wrong with an action rather than stopping in the middle of an airport with all the luggage in his hands.
    It can be argued that simply violently abusing your child is an 'easier' method of discipline than other methods, but that does nothing to convince me of its merits; it just hints at/appeals to lazy parenting (ergo bad parenting).

    What didn't make sense to you?
    I bolded the relevant part: "e.g a mother at the bus stop aggressively telling her 2ish(?) year old to shut up!whilst conversing with her friends". The "stop aggressively" bit in particular I don't think makes sense in the context of the sentence it is in.
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    (Original post by Illiberal Liberal)
    It can be argued that simply violently abusing your child is an 'easier' method of discipline than other methods, but that does nothing to convince me of its merits; it just hints at/appeals to lazy parenting (ergo bad parenting).
    'Easier' as in the circumstances I explained.I wouldn't put down all my luggage in a busy airport to shout at my child either. I don't think it's lazy, I think letting your child 'get away with murder' is lazy.


    I bolded the relevant part: "e.g a mother at the bus stop aggressively telling her 2ish(?) year old to shut up!whilst conversing with her friends". The "stop aggressively" bit in particular I don't think makes sense in the context of the sentence it is in.
    I'm not writing you an essay -_-

    'For example, I was at the bus stop a couple of weeks back and I witnessed a mother with her child who seemed to be sitting very uncomfortably in the pram and from my observations I would say there was only very little time left until the pram toppled over and the child fell out.

    As the mother conversed with what seemed to be her friends, but one cannot be sure since I have no personal relations with the mother but if I did I certainly wouldn't be crediting her on her parenting skills, the child appeared to become more irritable and the mother chose to stop this behaviour by spewing out an aggressive "SHUT UP!".'

    Better?
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    You're being pedantic :rolleyes:
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    I voted for 11am because personally I struggle with getting out of bed and functioning on a morning - this would be a lot more practical for me.
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    As early as possible. I may as well be asleep between 1-4, if I've eaten lunch

    Most school days are designed to have as many lessons as possible "in the morning" (aka before lunch) so lunch is pushed back as far as possible. Plus, it always feels more productive to get work done early.

    If a schoolday ended at 7, that's basically the evening gone, and you'd waste the morning in bed. I'm fine with 9 am start, but if I'm revising etc I'll start work around 8 ~ it's just when I work the best
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    Mine's different each day tbh..

    Monday: 1-3:10pm
    Tuesday: 8:40am-3:10pm
    Wednesday: 8:40-10:50am
    Thursday: 8:40am-3:10pm
    Friday: 11:10am-12:15pm

    Needless to say, Fridays are the best.
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    (Original post by Riverstar)
    My school lessons start at 9, and seeing as I average around 5 hours sleep I'd really appreciate a lie-in. Personally, I work better late at night so a 1-7 day would suit me way better than 9-4
    Same, I am so much more productive in the evenings. I am always tired until late afternoon and then I just get a burst of energy.
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    This is a bad school.
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    (Original post by Rock Fan)
    Should always be 9am, I would have hated finishing at 7pm and what about parents picking the children up.
    Well, it would actually give them a chance to have a full-time job. That is, if being picked up from school is a necessity in teen years.
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    That would be horrible. I would spend the entire morning knowing that I cant do anything worthwhile because I have to be at school by 1:30. The earlier the day starts, the better. Where I'm from, the schoolday/workday starts at 8AM, so even the 9AM start is weird for me.
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    I'd say 11pm would be the best time as you'd get a reasonable amount of sleep unlike when I was at school and generally was only getting about 3 or 4 hours sleep,1pm seems unnecessarily late to me...
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    My sixth form does a 8:45-3.25 day, so I would totally be up for a later start, 11am would be optimum for me as I find sleeping any later than 8:30am makes me very groggy but being up before 7am is just way too knackering!
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    I voted 9am. I had uni at 1pm and I remmeber it meant you couldn't do a huge amount. (ie, you couldn't do something like go home) because you only had a few hours to hang around and wait. 7am is a bit too early imo.

    I don't like this idea of starting at 1.30pm and finishing at 7pm. It's sometimes too dark to walk home at 7pm.
    PRSOM.

    I voted 9am also, because I have been used to getting up reasonably early. My school/Sixth form started at 9am (registration at 8:45am), and I was leaving the house at about 8am. At university I have 9am starts, which require me to leave the house at 7:30am, to allow enough time for commuting.

    I also don't like the idea of getting home too late - I don't like it when classes run to 6pm (getting home at 7:20pm) so would not like having to stay until 7pm!
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    Community Assistant
    I still think 9am is reasonable. Having to wait till 1pm for lesson to start then go home at 7pm, that's too much. The area that I go to school in wouldn't be suitable for that time, it's just too dangerous.
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    7pm is too late- when would you do homework?
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    9 am is perfect for me- 7 am is too early because most of the interesting programs on TV finish at around 10/11 pm so I won't get enough sleep. Everything after 9 am will just make me feel lazy and so it will make me unproductive.
 
 
 
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