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Do you recycle? watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you recycle?
    I recycle everything
    220
    27.16%
    I recycle a bit
    400
    49.38%
    I try but forget
    114
    14.07%
    No it's too much effort
    76
    9.38%

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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Its not the consumers fault that the producers/suppliers/retailers are too stupid/lazy to bother finding a way of selling us B grade produce. Send it to foodbanks or something.
    Yeah - I said that to my brother who is a forecaster at Waitrose. He said that if the shelves are empty people go elsewhere so supermarkets always have to over stock. And of course if you offer a Grade A and B veg next to each other, people will always go for Grade A. It is a tough nut to crack. However we are all in part responsible. Blaming the other lot for your shopping decisions doesn't help anything.
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Yeah - I said that to my brother who is a forecaster at Waitrose. He said that if the shelves are empty people go elsewhere so supermarkets always have to over stock. And of course if you offer a Grade A and B veg next to each other, people will always go for Grade A. It is a tough nut to crack. However we are all in part responsible. Blaming the other lot for your shopping decisions doesn't help anything.

    Not if the grade B stock is cheaper. Then some people will go for one type and some the other.

    Supermarkets should love that, its basically a form of price discrimination.
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    TSR Support Team
    Yes, everything that I can.
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    Only because I have to.
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    I was pretty shocked at just how much food waste there is. Think about all those mis-shaped carrots or parsnips with a slight blemish. They get dumped before they even hit the supermarket shelf. Then there is all the stuff that hits the shelves but doesn't sell.

    The problem is we consumers. We have all seen the bruised leftovers at the bottom of the box that no one wants to buy. But at the same time, if the supermarkets sold class B veg at half the price of class A, I would buy it. We have been working through quite a bit of carrot fly damaged carrots from the garden of late. Nothing wrong with them once you cut off the infected part and free to eat!
    I watched a docu on this and it's absolutely ridiculous how much food gets wasted in terms of not even making it to the supermarket in the first place due to it not being 'aesthetic' enough. Their standards are far too high to justify.
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    It's very difficult to recycle in the UK because there are very few recycle bins, compared to France and Germany where there are recycle bins at every corner - many buildings even have separate bins for plastic, cardboards and glass. In the UK, you sometimes have to walk half a mile with your bags... I understand those who don't bother.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    It's very difficult to recycle in the UK because there are very few recycle bins, compared to France and Germany where there are recycle bins at every corner - many buildings even have separate bins for plastic, cardboards and glass. In the UK, you sometimes have to walk half a mile with your bags... I understand those who don't bother.
    I think that is changing though. We now have four bins at home. On the street it is a bit mixed. Certainly around Manchester Uni and Man Met there are lots of recycling bins and Man Met boasts that it recycles the most of all universities. I also noted that around the bay in Cardiff and city centre there were lots of recycle bins. I guess it comes down to where you are?
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    Yeah - I said that to my brother who is a forecaster at Waitrose. He said that if the shelves are empty people go elsewhere so supermarkets always have to over stock. And of course if you offer a Grade A and B veg next to each other, people will always go for Grade A. It is a tough nut to crack. However we are all in part responsible. Blaming the other lot for your shopping decisions doesn't help anything.
    In France some supermarkets put javel water on the food they throw in their bins to prevent hobos from taking it. :indiff:
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    (Original post by ByEeek)
    I think that is changing though. We now have four bins at home. On the street it is a bit mixed. Certainly around Manchester Uni and Man Met there are lots of recycling bins and Man Met boasts that it recycles the most of all universities. I also noted that around the bay in Cardiff and city centre there were lots of recycle bins. I guess it comes down to where you are?
    Yeah, on the campus, but do all student accommodations have recycle bins?
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    (Original post by Josb)
    It's very difficult to recycle in the UK because there are very few recycle bins, compared to France and Germany where there are recycle bins at every corner - many buildings even have separate bins for plastic, cardboards and glass. In the UK, you sometimes have to walk half a mile with your bags... I understand those who don't bother.
    What I have noticed in the UK is that, where the council have provided public bins on the streets (not the bins belonging to each property, but the litter bins you see on the streets) they are only for general waste. No recycling bins at all.

    There should be bins for recycling as well as general litter bins.

    Also, something else that is relevant - certain materials that are not recyclable should no longer be made. Our local chip shop uses polystyrene trays - that's not recyclable! Use paper or cardboard trays instead. Same goes for traders that serve beverages in polystyrene cups. Why? Use paper or plastic instead.
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    What I have noticed in the UK is that, where the council have provided public bins on the streets (not the bins belonging to each property, but the litter bins you see on the streets) they are only for general waste. No recycling bins at all.

    There should be bins for recycling as well as general litter bins.
    I've seen bins on the street that are half recycling half rubbish in quite a few places. I think it depends on where you are.

    Sadly there is a sizeable proportion of people in this country that do no recycling at all, even in their homes where they have a separate recycling bin. It isn't particularly difficult to know what stuff can be recycled and what can't.
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    This is the kind of stuff that can be globalised.

    Some countries have overpopulation, poor toxic waste regulations and an underemployed workforce. Why should I bother, when they can, at a much lower relative time-cost?

    (Original post by Fullfofsurprises)
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    (Original post by spotify95)
    What I have noticed in the UK is that, where the council have provided public bins on the streets (not the bins belonging to each property, but the litter bins you see on the streets) they are only for general waste. No recycling bins at all.

    There should be bins for recycling as well as general litter bins.

    Also, something else that is relevant - certain materials that are not recyclable should no longer be made. Our local chip shop uses polystyrene trays - that's not recyclable! Use paper or cardboard trays instead. Same goes for traders that serve beverages in polystyrene cups. Why? Use paper or plastic instead.
    One of the biggest benefits of moving away from plastic in the food sector are that they no longer leech oestrogens into hot food.

    However, it is very, very cheap to use plastic.
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    I recycle pretty much everything and it grates at me when people don't. It's not very hard.

    If I get a bottle, can, newspaper, something like that, I'll wait until I get to a recycling bin/ home to throw it away. That said, I'd rather there were more recycling bins everywhere. Particularly in tube stations outside the dead centre of London. The amount of evening standards that work their way into general waste must be ridiculous.

    I waste very little food too, except if bread goes stale or something. Even then, if I'm at home it gets fed to the chickens.
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    (Original post by cole-slaw)
    Not if the grade B stock is cheaper. Then some people will go for one type and some the other.

    Supermarkets should love that, its basically a form of price discrimination.
    Put it next to the grade A produce, so that some customers go for it? But that likely doesn't make commercial sense. It will obviously sell at a lower margin than the grade A produce, and the cost of purchasing and then wasting the grade B produce apparently isn't enough to offset that. Perhaps they could put it up at a price at which some would sell at an acceptable margin, but then they might be left with a load of waste anyway, and they'd be using shelf-space unproductively.

    I don't know the figures exactly, but, in short, if it were in supermarkets' commercial interest to sell it, the likelihood is that they would be doing it. And if they give it to food banks, they'll risk detracting from the demand for their grade A produce, without getting anything in return. That being the case, if you want to stop waste, you'll probably have to legislate for it.

    Maybe the problem is at some other stage in the supply chain, but the point remains that if there were a way to make money by using up all the lower standard stuff, someone would have found a way to do it.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Put it next to the grade A produce, so that some customers go for it? But that likely doesn't make commercial sense. It will obviously sell at a lower margin than the grade A produce, and the cost of purchasing and then wasting the grade B produce apparently isn't enough to offset that. Perhaps they could put it up at a price at which some would sell at an acceptable margin, but then they might be left with a load of waste anyway, and they'd be using shelf-space unproductively.

    I don't know the figures exactly, but, in short, if it were in supermarkets' commercial interest to sell it, the likelihood is that they would be doing it. And if they give it to food banks, they'll risk detracting from the demand for their grade A produce, without getting anything in return. That being the case, if you want to stop waste, you'll probably have to legislate for it.

    Maybe the problem is at some other stage in the supply chain, but the point remains that if there were a way to make money by using up all the lower standard stuff, someone would have found a way to do it.
    The problem here is that the "Grade-B" produce is essentially mutated. There's a recent paper showing that eating mutated food changes your own DNA. The aversion to oddly shaped produce is not irrational aesthetics seeking, but like most instinctive reactions, has a sound basis.

    In all my time eating organic food, I've never come across a mutant vegetable. Maybe a very large one, but that was it. It's only GM and mass produced food that degrades in such ways, indicating its lack of quality and unfitness for human consumption.
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    (Original post by 41b)
    The problem here is that the "Grade-B" produce is essentially mutated. There's a recent paper showing that eating mutated food changes your own DNA. The aversion to oddly shaped produce is not irrational aesthetic seeking, but like most instinctive reactions, has a sound basis.

    In all my time eating organic food, I've never come across a mutant vegetable. Maybe a very large one, but that was it. It's only GM and mass produced food that degrades in such ways, indicating its lack of quality and unfitness for human consumption.
    Well, for a start, I don't necessarily consider it irrational to want your food to look nice as well as taste like it should. That's a perfectly legitimate consumer choice.

    But sure. I'm not disagreeing with you because I'm not really informed on this. I think my points on why supermarkets aren't selling them stand on their own, though.
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    (Original post by TimmonaPortella)
    Maybe the problem is at some other stage in the supply chain, but the point remains that if there were a way to make money by using up all the lower standard stuff, someone would have found a way to do it.

    If that were true, then no new businesses would ever succeed.
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    (Original post by Josb)
    In France some supermarkets put javel water on the food they throw in their bins to prevent hobos from taking it. :indiff:
    That sums up just how defunct capitalism can be.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    That sums up just how defunct capitalism can be.
    :rolleyes:

    Communism was so much better.
 
 
 
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