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Advice for a new runner?? watch

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    (Original post by bluemadhatter)
    so I cant wear running shoes to school?
    No. Just wear them for running.
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    Couch 2 5k is brilliant, the podcasts especially. I recommend speaking to someone in a specialist running shop who can advise you on the right shoes for you, especially if you're not sure if you need a neutral, support or cushioned shoe. I have always run on pavement, and have never had any trouble, it's about finding the right shoes for the activity. Trail running will require different shoes to road running.


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    You don't need to spend huge amounts on running shoes. One of the best pairs I ever had were also one of the cheapest pairs.
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    (Original post by bluemadhatter)
    How often should I run a week? (Max) Is what I'm doing okay until I am able to just keep running without breaking? What's the average miles I should and how should I slowly increase it
    Hi, I love running and at my best was going at least 4k a day on roads. I like to run at a stable pace and not stop. So if you can keep moving for an hour that should easily put you back 10k. That's a healthy distance and you're in very little danger of injury. But I wouldn't recommend this more than twice a week. It's also good to know that cross country can damage joints whereas roads will damage shins.

    To slowly increase it, make sure you're always out of breath! It might sound uncomfortable but you can be sure you're progressing. To slowly increase try to incorporate prolonged gentle hills as sprints don't tend to help with your stamina.

    To really improve, make sure you're having fun and feeling good afterwards to ensure you keep getting back out there!

    Would love to answer any more questions.
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    (Original post by Kyou)
    Get good shoes. They make all the difference. If you're on a budget, get the Roshes. Although not the best, for the price they're really comfortable. If you can afford it get some Free Runs though.
    I recommend Free Runs to everyone with my gait (mid). They're not the highest pricepoint, they look incredible and they last forever. Throw them in the wash and they look great again. So lightweight too. Damn I wish Nike would just sponsor me already.
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    (Original post by kateaustins)
    I recommend Free Runs to everyone with my gait (mid). They're not the highest pricepoint, they look incredible and they last forever. Throw them in the wash and they look great again. So lightweight too. Damn I wish Nike would just sponsor me already.
    They won't work for everyone though.
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    (Original post by bluemadhatter)
    Ooh So you'd run on the grass then??
    I really ruined by knees cross country! So long as you have reasonable support in your trainers which is right for your gait road running really shouldn't be too much for an issue. A road is beautifully flat and so you avoid twisting and rolling your joints. If you've got any smooth terrain I'd recommend that. Plus roads have better hills
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    They won't work for everyone though.
    Hence "everyone with my gait"
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    (Original post by kateaustins)
    Hence "everyone with my gait"
    And barefoot running shoes aren't recommended for new runners either.

    Join a running club if you can. My current club does cater for new runners. They do have a beginners course similar to the couch 2 5k.
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    Just run at your own pace It's sometimes difficult and down-putting when someone faster, more experienced than you overtakes you; it can sometimes be seen as a race/competition against them but it's actually a race/competition/challenge against yourself. Even if you don't beat your distance/speed/time each day, it doesn't matter. As long as you're out there enjoying yourself then it's all good. Plus some days you will naturally feel like turning around halfway and jumping on the couch to scoff some chocolates, while other days you will feel like Tom Hanks out of Forest Gump! You've also got to take into consideration things like the weather: running in/against high winds will alter your daily/weekly goals.

    It's up to you whether you want to try steady and slow or alternate between sprinting and walking. Just make sure you know how to breathe. It sounds silly, but it can make all the difference. Do not exert yourself to the point where you are keeling over, ready to die, huffing like you're about to have a heart attack. Concentrate on your breathing - make sure you breathe from your core, not nasally. Take longer to breathe in and out and try and keep it steady.

    Also, your running form is going to have a BIG impact on how far you go. If you're leaning too far forward or too far back, it's going to affect where your energy goes. For example, running with your arms swinging from side to side is WASTED energy! You're not going to the sides; you are going forward! Swing them back and forth but with relaxed shoulders. You will notices the longer/harder it is, your shoulders will bunch up. Every now and then remember to relax them.

    Running too far back on your heels will slow you down - your heels are the breaks to your body. Likewise, running to far on your toes means that you must be going at a great speed; if not, your strides need to be shortened for the speed you are going.

    If you get a stitch, it will usually (not always) be on your right side. To combat this, when you exhale, make sure your left foot hits the ground when you exhale, or right foot if the stitch is on the left. Your stitch should be gone in a few minutes. It works for me, no matter which side, and I'm lucky enough not to have gotten stitches on both sides! Haha.

    As for stretching, try dynamic stretching. So start off with a walk and gradually increase it to get your muscles warmed up. Also warm down afterwards instead of coming to an abrupt stop.

    Although running is known to have more of an impact on your knees than say swimming, by learning the correct running form you can reduce unnecessary strain and injury, and by being mindful of how your body is working on getting you from one step to the next.
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    (Original post by NeverTooLatte)
    Just run at your own pace It's sometimes difficult and down-putting when someone faster, more experienced than you overtakes you; it can sometimes be seen as a race/competition against them but it's actually a race/competition/challenge against yourself. Even if you don't beat your distance/speed/time each day, it doesn't matter. As long as you're out there enjoying yourself then it's all good. Plus some days you will naturally feel like turning around halfway and jumping on the couch to scoff some chocolates, while other days you will feel like Tom Hanks out of Forest Gump! You've also got to take into consideration things like the weather: running in/against high winds will alter your daily/weekly goals.

    It's up to you whether you want to try steady and slow or alternate between sprinting and walking. Just make sure you know how to breathe. It sounds silly, but it can make all the difference. Do not exert yourself to the point where you are keeling over, ready to die, huffing like you're about to have a heart attack. Concentrate on your breathing - make sure you breathe from your core, not nasally. Take longer to breathe in and out and try and keep it steady.

    Also, your running form is going to have a BIG impact on how far you go. If you're leaning too far forward or too far back, it's going to affect where your energy goes. For example, running with your arms swinging from side to side is WASTED energy! You're not going to the sides; you are going forward! Swing them back and forth but with relaxed shoulders. You will notices the longer/harder it is, your shoulders will bunch up. Every now and then remember to relax them.

    Running too far back on your heels will slow you down - your heels are the breaks to your body. Likewise, running to far on your toes means that you must be going at a great speed; if not, your strides need to be shortened for the speed you are going.

    If you get a stitch, it will usually (not always) be on your right side. To combat this, when you exhale, make sure your left foot hits the ground when you exhale, or right foot if the stitch is on the left. Your stitch should be gone in a few minutes. It works for me, no matter which side, and I'm lucky enough not to have gotten stitches on both sides! Haha.


    As for stretching, try dynamic stretching. So start off with a walk and gradually increase it to get your muscles warmed up. Also warm down afterwards instead of coming to an abrupt stop.

    Although running is known to have more of an impact on your knees than say swimming, by learning the correct running form you can reduce unnecessary strain and injury, and by being mindful of how your body is working on getting you from one step to the next.
    I've found a gem in that bolded part! When I got a stitch on competition I'll just press my hand on that part where I felt it lol. Now I know how you handle it. Thanks
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    (Original post by bluemadhatter)
    Okay so today I walked/ran for nearly 8 miles (about 3.8 going and coming). It took me about an 2 hours and a half altogether. I walked a lot and then I would do about 20 seconds of running then I'd go back to walking then I'd do it again after a couple minutes and then I'd increase the amount of time I'd run like for 40 seconds instead then I'd go to jogging then I'd go to walking. This was the first time I'd ever done any sort of exercise so I did find it a little challenging to KEEP running for a long time. By the end of it, I was able to increase the "running spurts" to about 2/3 minutes and then I could jog for a couple more minutes then I would walk for a shorter time and go back to running etc etc

    I really enjoyed it but my legs ached a little afterwards so I think I'll give it at least a day before I do it again. How often should I run a week? (Max) Is what I'm doing okay until I am able to just keep running without breaking? What's the average miles I should and how should I slowly increase it?

    Okay thanks
    One bit of advice that I stuck to when I started running a few months back, which is to mix up standard runs with high intensity sessions.

    So for me I was going out for a proper run 3 days a week, and then doing sprints sessions 2 days a week, so on those two days I was running circuits of 50m sprint, jog back to the start, 100m sprint, jog back to the start, 200m sprint, 30 seconds rest, repeat until collapse!
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    (Original post by mackemforever)
    One bit of advice that I stuck to when I started running a few months back, which is to mix up standard runs with high intensity sessions.

    So for me I was going out for a proper run 3 days a week, and then doing sprints sessions 2 days a week, so on those two days I was running circuits of 50m sprint, jog back to the start, 100m sprint, jog back to the start, 200m sprint, 30 seconds rest, repeat until collapse!
    That's just silly. You're doing too much. They recommend you do no more than 3 sessions a week. Rest is important too.
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    Buy a good pair of running trainers, these help, a LOT.

    Just take it steady, a few minutes of running then walk. Ideally you need a goal, maybe work up to doing a 3/5k run without stopping. Just don't worry about timings just yet, concentrate on distance and building fitness to start with.
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    That's just silly. You're doing too much. They recommend you do no more than 3 sessions a week. Rest is important too.
    Wouldn't class it as silly, we're all different. I was doing 5 days a week of running with two rest days and had no problems whatsoever. I agree that rest is important but the intensity of your sessions certainly come in to play.
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    [QUOTE=OU Student;60613245]And barefoot running shoes aren't recommended for new runners either.

    But isn't that an overgeneralisation from people who *are* runners struggling to make the transition? If you don't have a running style yet, there's nothing to unlearn when you use barefoot. I started with minimalist/barefoot shoes by chance, never run in anything else (all off road though because I have that choice, and because my Dad is still running in his 80s with all his own joints and stayed off roads)
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    (Original post by OU Student)
    That's just silly. You're doing too much. They recommend you do no more than 3 sessions a week. Rest is important too.
    I'm used to training six days a week for various sports, and I was doing this regime at a time when I was taking a break from most other things so I was simply replacing existing training sessions with running instead.
 
 
 
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