Pros and cons of being a full-time software Programmer Watch

TrojanH
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#21
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#21
(Original post by TheGuyReturns)
In before wannabe bankers show up to tell you you're paid ****.
Mid-level Software jobs in SF Bay Area make around 150k. Big finance hires for CS with even bigger pay checks, hedge funds, investment banks, negative is you get seen as a cost centre and the work is less fun than tech houses but if pay is what you want. Obviously in America as the UK tech industry is poor in comparison (but still stronger than other industries in the UK).
(Original post by Carpe Diem Jay)
Bit harsh (considering OPs drastic situation rip) but I see your point.
Experience != Employment
What I'm saying is that poster could quite easily get a job if they had decided to become more involved in IT and gain experience, rather then letting the degree speak for him (where thousands of grads hold just degrees, not standing out is a main reason as to why he cannot get a job)

(Original post by TheMaster102)
So for instance we make apps and games, to be honest some of design decisions in my opinion are pretty crap and I think I could design better graphics a lot of the time but I have to just bite my lip because i've been there too little to rock the boat, and even if I didn't, there's no point mentioning it because at our company whilst an artist may change stuff on request it's unlikely they'll start over completely which is what you often think they should
So OP where did you get your degree from and would you have any tips to get started, for us wanna be devs?
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TimeWalker
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#22
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#22
(Original post by TheMaster102)
I've worked as a programmer for quite a while now (4 months) and i've learnt a lot during my time here that I thought id share with TSR, for any aspiring students looking into getting into the field and might want to gain some insight into the daily experience as a full time programmer.
Thanks for the post. I have two questions if you wouldn't mind answering them.

1. What do developers do long term in software jobs: is it mostly working on project cycles for apps and things, or could it be other things like maintaining and updating code?

2. What should aspiring software developers mostly try to learn if they wish to go into IT (in terms of programming language, background knowledge etc.)?
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troubadour.
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#23
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#23
(Original post by shawn_o1)
"massive demand"? graduated with CompSci and no job for 6 months lol. Or it's completely my fault :rolleyes:
Out of interest, what was your degree classification?
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TheMaster102
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#24
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#24
(Original post by TimeWalker)
Thanks for the post. I have two questions if you wouldn't mind answering them.

1. What do developers do long term in software jobs: is it mostly working on project cycles for apps and things, or could it be other things like maintaining and updating code?

2. What should aspiring software developers mostly try to learn if they wish to go into IT (in terms of programming language, background knowledge etc.)?
My Answers:

1. It's both actually, the latter part is a nightmare. Nothing worse than working on someone else's code, especially if it was a contractor. This is because you'll have no idea how anything works and will have to stare at their code for hours before being able to proceed. Most of your work will revolve around building apps, you may be assigned an entire small app or a portion of the app, like a specific feature of part of the game/app.

2. Learn the mainstream languages, like Java etc. Java is the best bet because with that you instantly become more employable because you'll be flexible. If your only language is python, a pretty hipster language in my opinion, then you're going to find yourself less sought after.

I was hired with a knowledge of C#, Java, Actionscript 3 and basic HTML/CSS. I did not know Javascript at all, yet in my current position I am a Javascript programmer essentially as I've been assigned to the HTML5 team. They knew that because of the other languages I'd be able to learn Javascript easily which is what got me the job. So you can even get jobs in languages you don't know but are similar.
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