This girl got an interview for oxford but got ABBC for As levels?! Watch

fs1
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#21
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#21
(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
Shes VERY well off
(Original post by FOXDIE)
i've been told that universities such as oxford actually look at your family history as well. i know lots of amazing people who got turned down and they all had something in common like "single parent", "parents aren't drs" or even the fact that the school they went to isn't great. (they ended up going to places like mit or imperial tho)
this isnt true at all. i got an interview for law this year even though i initially got AACC at as level (one C went up to a B after remarks)
also, i omitted all information regarding my parents education history and occupation. unis don't even get this kind of information, including ethinicty, until after a student has been admitted onto their course.
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troubadour.
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#22
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
i've been told that universities such as oxford actually look at your family history as well.
This is half-true, but not remotely in the way that you think that it is. Oxford has a flagging system that slightly increases the chances of those from under-privileged backgrounds (measured by looking at rates of progression into higher education and socio-economic status from your postcode, with some consideration for your school's performance as well) being invited to interview (subject to an adequate performance in relevant admissions tests, of course).

Please don't spread this kind of piffle on a student website -- it will only work to discourage people from applying to Oxford.
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Doones
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#23
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(Original post by AngryRedhead)
How do you know?
Because they don't. They spend millions of pounds on widening access to Oxford.

Of course they can always do more but to say that a candidate will be discriminated against because they have a single parent or their parents aren't Drs is plain ridiculous.

Oh, and the success rate for applicants from the Independent sector (aka private schools) has fallen from 30% in 2007, to 25% in 2012
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Pars12
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#24
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
unfortunately life isn't that nice and people do look at your school name. and many places do favour private school students over students who have gone to public school that happen to be from a bad area. (based on irl experiences)
and i'm guessing they'd get info from interviews, ucas forms, and references.
You've got it upside down.

Private school students get better grades because they get better teaching and resources. That's a fact.

Many places favour better grades. They make their choice because they DON'T care which school you went to. Perhaps they should. That's politics.

They don't get info from interviews because they make this decision before they interview you.

There is no place on a UCAS form to tick if one or both of your parents is a doctor and it would look pretty silly on a reference. (e.g. "Johnny has worked very hard at history and both his parents are doctors" ).
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Doones
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
fine let me reword "private schools" to independent fee paying schools, such as lancing college.
but honestly by the looks of it they don't favour those from non-privileged backgrounds; if they were i'm sure they'd let in more well abled students. but i don't know,

>>> i dont have factual source so can't really say <<<
Boooooooooooom!
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Pars12
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
oxford doesn't look at money, they look at people's backgrounds since they like to uphold their status and history.
most politicians are 'out of touch' from birth rather than uni tbh
This just keeps getting better!

Thank you! You have brightened this thread up at a time when it gets very jittery and introspective.

Is it just the politicians or aren't we all a bit 'out of touch' when we are born?
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Doones
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
oxford doesn't look at money, they look at people's backgrounds since they like to uphold their status and history.
most politicians are 'out of touch' from birth rather than uni tbh
Do you even watch Downton Abbey? Doctors aren't privileged. You have to be a full blown Lord to be entitled to privilege in this life.

Hargreaves, fetch my slippers.
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Pars12
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(Original post by Hydeman)

Please don't spread this kind of piffle on a student website -- it will only work to discourage people from applying to Oxford.
Better out than in.
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Piledriver
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#29
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I got an interview at Cambridge with AAD at AS level ( one of the A's was one mark off a B) I also know of someone who got a Cambridge interview this year with ABBB at AS.
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Mystery.
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#30
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#30
Maybe someone died in her family or something, who knows.
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Doones
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#31
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(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
So im my sixth form nearly everyone has been rejected for Oxford a part from a girl who got ABBC for AS levels! She got 9A* for GCSE and she is head girl, so guys if you are thinking of applying for Oxford but dont have good AS results all is not lost!
(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
Shes VERY well off
(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
Geography
From Oxford's Geography admissions selection criteria:
http://www.geog.ox.ac.uk/undergradua...-criteria.html

"Candidates who have achieved or are predicted grades lower than the standard offer will not normally be invited for interview. Otherwise, the decision to invite candidates for interview will be based on achievement in the TSA and, where available, contextualised GCSE data."

No mention of AS-levels or the need to be (even very) well off.
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J Papi
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#32
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(Original post by AngryRedhead)
How do you know?
The information on UCAS relating to your parent's education is only a binary "My parent acceded to higher edu/ My parent did not", whereas the "highest paid" member of the family question only asks for a general vocational background (e.g. electrical engineer), and not specifics about wages, education, and so on. They have no way of figuring out the details, and I can't imagine them stalking the tens of applicants on facebook and somehow finding their family background details relevant in any case.

As someone's who's actually had an interview at Oxford, and spoken to undergraduates there, you'd be really surprised at how diverse the student profiles are. This also applies to the lecturers, a considerable number of whom were not British, were not educated at British public schools, and frankly don't give a **** about "tradition" or "history", but rather look for someone they'd enjoy to teach and who is of a sufficiently high calibre for them. Generally speaking, considering just how wide the range of nationalities and backgrounds is (go onto the "Academic Staff" section of any college website and read through the surnames. Check their degrees as well if you think it's important.), they would have no reason to favour the traditionally posh public school kid over a superior applicant from a less distinguished background. After all, if we take this to be a "clique" thing, they would have no personal interest in taking a guy from a different ethnic or socioeconomic background to them. That's not to even start talking about all the safeguards Oxford has internally to remove any cases of bias against people of particular backgrounds.

(Original post by FOXDIE)
i dont have factual source so can't really say
Of course you don't. There is a huge disparity between the 13% of A-level entries and 40-something% of privately-educated undergraduates, but that is explicable from a wide range of factors that cannot be boiled down to overt discrimination. These could range from the quality/rigour of teaching, to the extracurriculars on offer, to the connections and work experience opportunities offered by a private school, and the greater level of support pre-interview that leads to greater confidence and more factual knowledge on interview day. You may also get people who were offered scholarships or bursaries to top public schools, and as such have been proven already to be superlative in their cohort (if you're good enough to be a scholar in a selective public school, you're pretty good, and that's an achievement that they will notice). Besides, people from lower-income families may choose to apply to oversubscribed courses that offer a greater chance of employment on the other side(such as Law, Economics, or Medicine), as opposed to the less competitive arts courses (such as Classics or M.Languages)

Besides, many states school students, feeling that they are not good enough for Oxford, or that they wouldn't enjoy it's teaching style or stereotypically posh environment, may be put off even applying in the first place. This is not helped by ignorant idiots like you who spread around baseless rumours based on nothing but stereotypes and flights of fancy.
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robinfr
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#33
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(Original post by Bubblybabybling)
Geography
I read an article about degrees to do if you want to get into Oxbridge. geography was one of them
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Good bloke
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#34
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(Original post by Mystery.)
Maybe someone died in her family or something, who knows.
People have been dying in my family for generations.
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brendan.
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#35
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Besides, many states school students, feeling that they are not good enough for Oxford, or that they wouldn't enjoy it's teaching style or stereotypically posh environment, may be put off even applying in the first place. This is not helped by ignorant idiots like you who spread around baseless rumours based on nothing but stereotypes and flights of fancy.
This. I was so very close to not applying to Oxford because I didn't think I'd fit in, I wasn't clever enough, I wouldn't stand a chance against any so-called 'trained private-schooled applicants'. Even though Cambridge visited my school as part of their outreach programme and I was lucky enough to be invited to Oxford for the day with other students from local schools at home, I still wasn't convinced that I should give it a shot until the day before Oxford's September open day. It's very sad but true that negative stereotypes about Oxbridge run deep putting off many able applicants, and it's odd to think that I was one day fully invested in these stereotypes. As a disclaimer, I still had these reservations about Oxbridge even though I attended a selective state school that had previously sent a handful of students to Oxford or Cambridge. But home is a town where there was quite a bit of disbelief that I was going to university at the 'real Oxford'. I was the first generation going to university in my family, and although my parents were supportive, they couldn't really help too much with the application procedure. Other than being bright and going to a decent school, I felt like the odds were stacked against me, largely because I listened to relentless criticism online. As it happens, I did end up in Oxford and I'm very glad that I took the chance to apply, and in reality, I now realise that there are many who face much tougher obstacles when applying for universities. I can't imagine what it's like to be in a school where bright students are actively put off applying to Oxbridge because of misguided teachers and this is something that really needs to be addressed. Ignorant comments regarding money, politics and family history in securing places certainly doesn't help either. Yes, there might be still a way to go and there are likely many students from 'poor' backgrounds that are worthy of places at Oxbridge, but honestly I think that Oxford (and I'm sure equally Cambridge) are doing a darn good job at trying to make this happen. Far more goes into the decision than your attained and predicted grades, and let's not forget that pretty much everybody that applies is academic enough to be offered a place. Shouldn't we be encouraging more to apply rather than putting them off?
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RulesforRadicals
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#36
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(Original post by FOXDIE)
i've been told that universities such as oxford actually look at your family history as well. i know lots of amazing people who got turned down and they all had something in common like "single parent", "parents aren't drs" or even the fact that the school they went to isn't great. (they ended up going to places like mit or imperial tho)
I highly doubt they turn people away for not having successful parents.


If anything having a tough background counts in your favour, the idea being that you have to have greater ability to offset that lack of cultural capital you had growing up.

(Original post by Hydeman)
This is half-true, but not remotely in the way that you think that it is. Oxford has a flagging system that slightly increases the chances of those from under-privileged backgrounds (measured by looking at rates of progression into higher education and socio-economic status from your postcode, with some consideration for your school's performance as well) being invited to interview (subject to an adequate performance in relevant admissions tests, of course).Please don't spread this kind of piffle on a student website -- it will only work to discourage people from applying to Oxford.
Exactly.


The tutors realise that it's not a level playing field and incorporate that difference into their admissions policy. We really don't live in a country where people from deprived backgrounds are held back in an intentional way, (even if it still is harder for them.)
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Princepieman
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#37
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(Original post by AngryRedhead)
Is this true?

No wonder politicians are so out of touch.

It is very sad that Oxford only looks at money.
It is bollox. Those factors are supposed help them get interviews, not disqualify them..

Oxford look at contextual information, and they have a flagging system where if you tick a few of the contextual info boxes: low performing school, first gen uni goer, been in care etc. You'll get guaranteed an interview.

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ckfeister
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#38
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Cambridge is less biased.
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mishieru07
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#39
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(Original post by Princepieman)
It is bollox. Those factors are supposed help them get interviews, not disqualify them..

Oxford look at contextual information, and they have a flagging system where if you tick a few of the contextual info boxes: low performing school, first gen uni goer, been in care etc. You'll get guaranteed an interview.

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You don't get "guaranteed an interview". It's just something they will take into account when evaluating your academic performance to date. I don't recall Oxford ever stating that students who get flagged definitely get an interview. If you have sources, I would be interested in seeing them.

(Original post by ckfeister)
Cambridge is less biased.
And your source for this assertion is?
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J Papi
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(Original post by mishieru07)
You don't get "guaranteed an interview". It's just something they will take into account when evaluating your academic performance to date. I don't recall Oxford ever stating that students who get flagged definitely get an interview. If you have sources, I would be interested in seeing them.
Now that's interesting, because I remember the Oxbridge outreach/admissions people visiting our school saying that they would create a small number of extra spaces for interview for prospective students from backgrounds that would be flagged. That's not to say that a flagged candidate would get one automatically, but there were reserved spaces for some (I presume the most promising) of them in addition to the regular, open slots. I've got no idea whether you could find this somewhere on their website, but here we go.

Edit: They also distinctly warned that all flags are removed post-interview, meaning that weaker candidates who got an interview by virtue of their background would not be positively favoured over anyone else - it becomes neutral at that point.

(Original post by ckfeister)
Cambridge is less biased.
klol
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