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Spontaneous surgical emphysema - if you know what this is, can you answer my question Watch

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    (Original post by Lehoe)
    That's fair, it must be pretty frustrating for you not to get an answer they've actually thought out and considered carefully.
    it took a long time to find out what it was as even the drs at the childrens specialist hospital didnt even know what it was.

    apparently only 5 kids a year get diagnosed with it
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    it took a long time to find out what it was as even the drs at the childrens specialist hospital didnt even know what it was.

    apparently only 5 kids a year get diagnosed with it
    You later post makes it a bit clearer what happened. I've seen it in adults - not kids. Last adult I saw had been weight lifting.

    Usually what happens is a cough, sneeze or strain (like when doing press ups). THe vocal cords are shut and the air pressure in the chest rises. Occasionally this can lead to a pneumothorax - very common and many people on here will have had one.
    But at other times (rarely) the lining of the windpipe ruptures and air leaks into the tissue of the neck. From there it can force its way down into the chest wall. (above the ribs - quite shallow really). THis is surgical emphysema. it feels a bit like bubble wrap.

    It absorbs over the space of a few weeks and presents no danger to flying. The only check doctors would make would be if there was a pneumothorax (given the two are connected) or any air in the mediastinum. IF neither of those - all good.

    But an earlier post suggested this all happened, once 4 years ago. It should all have completely resolved long long ago so flying would be safe.

    If it hasn't all gone or has reoccured then something more odd would be the cause which would need further investigating.

    hope that helps
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    You later post makes it a bit clearer what happened. I've seen it in adults - not kids. Last adult I saw had been weight lifting.

    Usually what happens is a cough, sneeze or strain (like when doing press ups). THe vocal cords are shut and the air pressure in the chest rises. Occasionally this can lead to a pneumothorax - very common and many people on here will have had one.
    But at other times (rarely) the lining of the windpipe ruptures and air leaks into the tissue of the neck. From there it can force its way down into the chest wall. (above the ribs - quite shallow really). THis is surgical emphysema. it feels a bit like bubble wrap.

    It absorbs over the space of a few weeks and presents no danger to flying. The only check doctors would make would be if there was a pneumothorax (given the two are connected) or any air in the mediastinum. IF neither of those - all good.

    But an earlier post suggested this all happened, once 4 years ago. It should all have completely resolved long long ago so flying would be safe.

    If it hasn't all gone or has reoccured then something more odd would be the cause which would need further investigating.

    hope that helps

    im impressed you know what it is in such detail. my sons was bought on by a severe coughing fit but thankfully hasnt happened since.
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    im impressed you know what it is in such detail. my sons was bought on by a severe coughing fit but thankfully hasnt happened since.
    Should be no risk for flying if so long ago.

    I would however advise checking with a respiratory consultant (or pulmonologist if you are in US) before allowing your child to take up scuba diving. There are some strictish rules about scuba diving if there is any history of spontatneous airway rupture.
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Should be no risk for flying if so long ago.

    I would however advise checking with a respiratory consultant (or pulmonologist if you are in US) before allowing your child to take up scuba diving. There are some strictish rules about scuba diving if there is any history of spontatneous airway rupture.
    haha!! no scuba diving any time soon lol.
    il bear it in mind though, thanks
    can i ask how u know so much about it?
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    (Original post by shawtyb)
    haha!! no scuba diving any time soon lol.
    il bear it in mind though, thanks
    can i ask how u know so much about it?
    Emergency specialist doctor
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    (Original post by Jamie)
    Emergency specialist doctor
    where was you when i needed you haha!
 
 
 
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