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Do you think people should self-diagnose mental illness? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do you think people should self-diagnose mental illness?
    Yes
    30.56%
    No
    61.11%
    Unsure
    8.33%

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    I guess in the process of trying to diagnose yourself, you might notice more symptoms that you previously didn't realise were not normal. However at the same time, sometimes it can be hard to associate actual behaviour with the description of the symptoms. As in, you'll see the descriptions but you don't know how it actually shows, what kind of behaviours count towards it. It's best to be diagnosed by a professional, but researching and thinking more about your own feelings will help you have more to say to that person; this just makes a diagnosis easier.
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    I think it's better to be seen by the right professional in relation to any diagnoses. Googling your symptoms whether it be for physical or mental health can lead you to believe you have all kinds of illness!. And mental health isn't straight forward as you think there are a lot of Grey areas so while you look up your symptoms. You could read something and believe you have a more serious illness!. Every professional is trained in there field appropriately and will be able to give an accurate and appropriate diagnosis given your symptoms. So I would say the answer to your question no you can't diagnose yourself with a mental health problem.
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    No, people shouldn't self diagnose mental illness. My mum is away with the fairies but thinks that everyone else is mentally ill so without diagnosis from a doctor she'd go on thinking she was the normal one
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    In my experience doctors have been useless. I've suffered with what I'd call "depression" for years. On and off I can sometimes feel extremely low, completely de-motivated and just not wanting to get out of bed, this could last a day or several days.

    I went to the doctors three times over the space of 2 years, explained the symptoms and each time was fobbed off with them saying there was nothing that could be done. One doctor even said "Unless you're having suicidal thoughts we can't do anything". Okay...?

    After spending hours reading up on-line and researching Lithium Orotate, I began taking this 10mg per day - after about 1 month my depression was much more manageable - I still have down days, but nowhere near as bad as before. It may all just be placebo effect but in my case the "professionals" didn't help me at all.

    Annoyingly one of my mates mentioned to his doctor about feeling a little down lately in passing and was instantly put on anti-depressants! Go figure...
    Did you see the same doctor each time? Different doctors will take a different approach. But to say they can't do anything unless you're suicidal is stupid. They should at the very least be able to refer you to a therapy service.
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    I believe that diagnoses can actually have the ability to be incredibly damaging, if not done responsibly and purposefully. Mental illnesses are extremely complex conditions and it can be difficult to get a collection of symptoms and then produce a diagnosis. A correct diagnosis takes time and skill. You need to analyse the current symptoms, take an accurate and detailed mental state examination, take a medical and social history, take a family history and consider other possible conditions that may explain someone's symptoms and current state. You also need to monitor them over a period of time, and you may want to try treatments or tests to rule out other conditions.

    I don't know anyone who can do all of that over than a qualified medical doctor (and I would argue that a diagnosis of severe mental illness must ONLY be done by an experienced psychiatrist). I'm training to be a social worker and I've worked in mental health for a while, alongside caring for my partner who has a mental illness and I have 10 years of personal experience, but I would not consider myself anywhere near qualified to make a diagnosis for myself or anyone else. I may have a suspicion and I have said to psychiatrists "I have a feeling that X may be showing signs of this illness", but that doesn't mean I can diagnose someone.

    I know diagnoses can provide comfort to people and help them understand their situation, however, a diagnosis does not solve anything. Only actions such as medication, therapy, lifestyle choices and self help can actually help you move forward from a mental illness. If you are getting a diagnosis and doing nothing from it, is it worth getting a diagnosis in the first place? Diagnoses can be extremely disempowering and can distract someone from making positive steps, using their strengths to move forward in their life.

    I think self diagnoses are extremely dangerous as there is a high chance of getting it wrong. Many people may think they are depressed but they may not be, or another common one is in the case of bipolar. We cannot always view ourselves objectively, especially when unwell. Yes, we are the experts of ourselves, but in terms of our experiences, NOT what psychiatric label we have.

    I'll give an example. Recently I had a "manic" episode. I wasn't sleeping, I was talking very fast, I was much more interested in sex, I had many many ideas, mainly around businesses I would start. I was impulsive, I thought I was going to win a Nobel prize because I had this idea which would bring world peace, so because of this I stopped going to work because I thought I was better than that. Eventually the university called me an ambulance because I couldn't sit down and was pacing the room all the time talking about rubbish. The psychiatric team at the hospital said I was manic and the crisis team came to see me. However, they said I did not have bipolar disorder, and that it was part of my personality disorder. My symptoms were classic of a manic episode, and if I was self diagnosing, I would be convincing myself I was bipolar and expecting heavy medication from my GP, which wouldn't benefit me in the long run.

    So to sum up, I think self diagnosis can be dangerous. If you wouldn't want to get diagnosed by someone without a medical degree, why accept it from yourself, when your main source of information is the Internet? If you feel you have a mental illness, the best thing is to see a doctor. Or you run the risk of burdening yourself with a diagnosis which you may not even have.


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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    In my experience doctors have been useless. I've suffered with what I'd call "depression" for years. On and off I can sometimes feel extremely low, completely de-motivated and just not wanting to get out of bed, this could last a day or several days.

    I went to the doctors three times over the space of 2 years, explained the symptoms and each time was fobbed off with them saying there was nothing that could be done. One doctor even said "Unless you're having suicidal thoughts we can't do anything". Okay...?

    After spending hours reading up on-line and researching Lithium Orotate, I began taking this 10mg per day - after about 1 month my depression was much more manageable - I still have down days, but nowhere near as bad as before. It may all just be placebo effect but in my case the "professionals" didn't help me at all.

    Annoyingly one of my mates mentioned to his doctor about feeling a little down lately in passing and was instantly put on anti-depressants! Go figure...

    I had the same experience with doctors when it came to mental health, only difference was I actually was suicidal and would also consistently harm myself yet they still wouldn't do anything about it.

    I have no doubt in my mind I was severely depressed at the time, and it infuriates me when people say "oh but you can't know that, you're not a doctor"...well a fat load of good the "doctors" did when I tried to commit suicide.

    I appreciate there are some fantastic doctors out there, but it's also no secret a lot of doctors and notoriously GPs don't have a ****ing clue when it comes to mental health...and good luck getting referred to someone who will actually help when your GPs will do nothing or even acknowledge you...and don't even get me started on waiting lists.

    Thankfully I'm doing a lot better now on my own.
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    You are taking lithium without any medical supervision?. Very dangerous!?. You may have been experiencing periods low
    Mood which is very common. However I'm concerned that you are taking lithium without medical supervison?. It effectives kidney functioning and also can effective your thyroid?. I think if you have trial go back to Gp request a different dr and information them of the situation before you cause any problems to your health ?.
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    Self diagnosis is inadvisable, but when GPs are so shite and referral times are so long, it's hard to figure out what else people are supposed to do. It's taken me months of bothering the NHS to even get a simple phone call with an actual mental health professional, let alone an assessment for anything other than depression.
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    I didn´t know I was depressed until I was told by a psychologist when I was 18. I started crying out of the blue in class and I couldn´t stop for hours, so the schools health advisor sent me there. I had no idea why, and thought everything that made me "me" was just how it should be. turned out the way I carry everything inside is not healthy

    Honestly I somehow felt better before the diagnosis came since there has been many ups and downs since then. But at least I know recognise it faster and know when to see my doctor.

    But I am not surprised people self diagnose, the lack of GP´s in the country, and the lack of GP´s understanding the significance of mental health seems quite low. And IF they say that you should go and see someone, where should they send you after your self-referral is used up? All the GP can do is to prescribe meds (for simpler MH problems) and say you should talk to a friend. Who is going to give you tools for the future and help you process the past?
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    Medical professional knows what they're doing, you don't. Nuff said.
    Not on everything, they were never able to diagnose what I had when I was young. (collapsing and later hallucinations)
    Well, I think GPs just can't be good at everything.
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    They pretty much are anyway - your relaying of the symptoms is essentially up to you How bad you feel. How restless you are etc. The doc can't get in your head to check and he can't stalk your life. How you report your 'symptoms' is up to you so in many ways a self diagnosis is a thing.
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    All special snowflakes these days have depression, PTSD or are bipolar.
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    Self diagnosis can typically give a sense of relief if you can finally put a name to the way you've been feeling. For example if you research the symptoms of depression and you understand that there's an explanation for why you haven't been feeling great for the past few months. However self diagnosis cannot and should not be used in order to explain certain behaviour towards other people. Also if you have self diagnosed, it is best to go to a medical professional and tell them what you've found online and that if they agree with your personal judgement and to get proper medical care that you think you require
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    I do it all the time, the other day I diagnosed myself with necrophilia.
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    (Original post by Lil08)
    I do it all the time, the other day I diagnosed myself with necrophilia.
    wtf
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    I feel as though depression is a social problem not a medical one imo.
    • #2
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    (Original post by Ayyylmaoo)
    I feel as though depression is a social problem not a medical one imo.
    Well you 'feel' wrong.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Well you 'feel' wrong.
    Yupp I probably am, just my opinion (feelings, irrational, I know) but I don't think it should be sacrosanct to be able to challenge the idea that depression is a medical problem.
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    (Original post by Ayyylmaoo)
    Yupp I probably am, just my opinion (feelings, irrational, I know) but I don't think it should be sacrosanct to be able to challenge the idea that depression is a medical problem.
    Yeah I know what you mean.
    I challenge the idea that diabetes is a medical problem too.

    s/
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    Yeah I know what you mean.
    I challenge the idea that diabetes is a medical problem too.

    s/
    Can you tell that to a friends daughter who has constant issues controlling her blood sugar? Oh, and it can leave people with serious medical problems, such as blindness.
 
 
 
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