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Do you think I'm limiting myself too much if I took these A-levels? watch

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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Still limited, these are pretty much all humanities. In addition, linguistics&classics are basically the study of language & English is included is one of the subjects she wants to do. History at a good uni will require A level history.
    For competitive courses, universities will look for students studying A level subjects that are similar to the uni course they've applied for.
    What if OP decides she wants to go into healthcare? Or a science? Or a social science?

    In the title of the thread, she even asks if she's limiting herself. You're essentially saying 'no but you can only study a limited number of humanities courses at uni'
    I'm not going to list every single subject, but essentially it is possible to study any non-science degree with three language-based A levels. If the OP changed her mind in the future and decided she wanted to do a science degree, she could do so via a foundation year. The OP needs to make this decision based on her current interests, it is folly to try and speculate what one might want to do in the future.

    Oh and FYI I got into UCL to study history, didn't do it at A level. So that's wrong.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    I'm not going to list every single subject, but essentially it is possible to study any non-science degree with three language-based A levels. If the OP changed her mind in the future and decided she wanted to do a science degree, she could do so via a foundation year. The OP needs to make this decision based on her current interests, it is folly to try and speculate what one might want to do in the future.

    Oh and FYI I got into UCL to study history, didn't do it at A level. So that's wrong.
    By non-science, you mean humanities. You've already listed them and some of them involve language & my main point is that she would be likely to go to uni for a language based subject with those A levels.
    Why do a foundation year when all you have to do is swap or do an additional A level in order to be open to many more courses?
    I'm aware, but she is limiting herself, clearly.

    How long ago did you attend UCL? Because:
    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-stu...es/history-ba/
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    By non science, you mean humanities? You've already listed them and some of them involve language & my main point is that she would be likely to go to uni for a language based subject with those A levels.
    Why do a foundation year when all you have to do is swap or do an additional A level in order to be open to many more courses?
    I'm aware, but she is limiting herself, clearly.

    How long ago did you attend UCL? Because:
    http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-stu...es/history-ba/
    No, I don't just mean humanities, I mean exactly what I said, non-science. Half of the subjects I listed were social sciences. If the OP enjoys science then sure, it might be an idea to study a science A level to hedge your bets - but again, you don't know what the OP likes. Until they specifically say "I really enjoy science" it is fair to assume they don't.

    I applied last year.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    No, I don't just mean humanities, I mean exactly what I said, non-science. Half of the subjects I listed were social sciences. If the OP enjoys science then sure, it might be an idea to study a science A level to hedge your bets - but again, you don't know what the OP likes. Until they specifically say "I really enjoy science" it is fair to assume they don't.

    Last year.
    No they weren't.
    I have never claimed to know what OP likes. I gave suggestions. If she's doing a language and a humanities, perhaps a science or social science would go well with that combination so that she is not limited.
    It's also fair to say she is limiting herself with those choices.
    According to the UCL website, history A level is required to study history.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Impossible to answer without knowing more about you. It all depends what you want to do after your A levels.
    How is this comment any different to my initial comment?
    You just want to argue.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    No they weren't.
    I have never claimed to know what OP likes. I gave suggestions. If she's doing a language and a humanities, perhaps a science or social science would go well with that combination so that she is not limited.
    It's also fair to say she is limiting herself with those choices.
    According to the UCL website, history A level is required to study history.
    Yes they really are social sciences. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_science

    You're only looking at the single honours history degree. Some of the joint/combined degrees do not require history. Cambridge and Oxford do not require history either for that matter.

    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    How is this comment any different to my initial comment?
    You just want to argue.
    I said do whatever subjects you enjoy, but you advised the OP to study a science of social science (without asking them if they liked those subjects) - pretty different I would say. We're going around in circles, clearly there's no point debating this further.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Yes they really are social sciences. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Social_science

    You're only looking at the single honours history degree. Some of the joint/combined degrees do not require history. Cambridge and Oxford do not require history either for that matter.



    I said do whatever subjects you enjoy, but you advised the OP to study a science of social science (without asking them if they liked those subjects) - pretty different I would say. We're going around in circles, clearly there's no point debating this further.
    It says that social sciences include some fields in humanities. How does this prove your point?

    You initially said that you got into a top uni for History without having A level History. I don't know how you managed that since they all say it is required.
    Oxford say it's desirable to have A level history. Cambridge say that some of their colleges require A level history and also say '..successful applicants take all sorts of subjects from Mathematics and the sciences, to arts and social sciences.'

    You said it depends on what she wants to do after A levels. I am essentially saying the same thing. If she wants to do a language based subject after A levels then her choices are fine. If she's unsure or doesn't want to, then she should take something else in addition. I have never said she should do something she's not interested in. I simply said that there are other subjects she should consider so that she won't be limiting herself.

    We're going around in circles because you're trying to argue something that doesn't need to be argued.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    It says that social sciences include some fields in humanities. How does this prove your point?

    You initially said that you got into a top uni for History without having A level History. I don't know how you managed that since they all say it is required.
    Oxford say it's desirable to have A level history. Cambridge say that some of their colleges require A level history and also say '..successful applicants take all sorts of subjects from Mathematics and the sciences, to arts and social sciences.'
    Tell me which subjects you think are social sciences and I will prove you can do them at degree level without an A level in the subject. Desirable is not a requirement. Most Cambridge colleges do not require history.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Tell me which subjects you think are social sciences and I will prove you can do them at degree level without an A level in the subject. Desirable is not a requirement. Most Cambridge colleges do not require history.
    why are you arguing so much ? leave it D; youve said your piece to help op now get on with your morning. have an early brunch
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    (Original post by chickenfoot)
    why are you arguing so much ? leave it D; youve said your piece to help op now get on with your morning. have an early brunch
    If people quote me I'm going to respond.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Tell me which subjects you think are social sciences and I will prove you can do them at degree level without an A level in the subject. Desirable is not a requirement. Most Cambridge colleges do not require history.
    I didn't say you need an A level in the social subject to do it at university level. They'd prefer you to have A levels in relevant subjects though, particularly through clearing.
    I said you need an A level in history to do it at university level.
    You're clutching at straws here. Desirable means that the university will prefer it, so if they have limited spacing on a competitive course, they will go for the applicant with the desirable requirement.
    'Most Cambridge colleges do not require A level history' Why would anyone want to sell themselves short?
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    I didn't say you need an A level in the social subject to do it at university level. They'd prefer you to have A levels in relevant subjects though, particularly through clearing.
    I said you need an A level in history to do it at university level.
    You're clutching at straws here. Desirable means that the university will prefer it, so if they have limited spacing on a competitive course, they will go for the applicant with the desirable requirement. Why would anyone want to sell themselves short?
    You said "if she were to do 3 languages at A level, she'd only be likely to receive an offer for a language [degree]" - this is not true, as I have shown.

    An admissions tutor would not choose one applicant over another just because they had studied a certain A level. If a university says a subject is desirable it just means they will consider anyone with or without it, having it would not tip the balances in your favour, there are so many other more important factors.

    Until the OP replies and gives us more information, specifically what they'd like to do at uni and what other subjects they'd be happy to do at A level, there's nothing more to be said. I still maintain that the most important thing is to study what you enjoy, feel free to disagree.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    I don't think law would be keen on AS levels confined to languages. Advice I was given in 4th year was to keep a social science at higher level and also to take maths or a pure science that's why I did biology and modern studies at those levels and taking MS at AH level. You sound like your'e arguing just for the sake of it when the others have given what sounds like pretty sensible advice.
    There are no required A-levels for law

    You can study Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Music and can still get onto a law course.

    The only thing I'd recommend is to swap English Lang with literature, and perhaps think of a fourth subject which is more analytical.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    You said "if she were to do 3 languages at A level, she'd only be likely to receive an offer for a language [degree]" - this is not true, as I have shown.

    An admissions tutor would not choose one applicant over another just because they had studied a certain A level. If a university says a subject is desirable it just means they will consider anyone with or without it, having it would not tip the balances in your favour, there are so many other more important factors.

    Until the OP replies and gives us more information, specifically what they'd like to do at uni and what other subjects they'd be happy to do at A level, there's nothing more to be said. I still maintain that the most important thing is to study what you enjoy, feel free to disagree.
    You named a bunch of humanities courses,with
    a lot of them including language based degrees. In addition, the degrees you named don't ask for any desired subjects, which means that it is open for anyone to apply for. This increases the likelihood of a large number of applicants and they may have to award offers by a process of elimination. The ones with at least one A level relating to the course applied for will therefore be at an advantage.

    Yes they would, why else would they list desirable A levels? If a university says a subject is desirable, that means that you will be second choice to the people who have the desired subject. The Cambridge website even said that successful applicants have a variety of social science, arts and humanities. If they have an influx of applicants with desired grades, the ones without would be discarded pretty quickly. You said 'most colleges at Cambridge don't require it A level' so? Most applicants will have it. Why would you put yourself in that position? Is it not better to put your self at an advantage instead of at a disadvantage? Oxbridge and other unis also say that a minimum of a C is required at GCSE in English and maths. How many of the successful applicants do you think have C grades at GCSE?

    You're so annoying :laugh: when did I ever say she should study something she doesn't enjoy? You took my words out of context and you twisted them.
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    (Original post by jamestg)
    There are no required A-levels for law

    You can study Maths, Biology, Chemistry and Music and can still get onto a law course.

    The only thing I'd recommend is to swap English Lang with literature, and perhaps think of a fourth subject which is more analytical.
    Really? Why should she do a 4th subject?
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    Only if the OP enjoys those subjects. At the end of the day grades matter more than subjects, you're more likely to get a bad grade if you're studying something you hate.
    This is, unfortunately, untrue from an employers perspective. You will need to consider and research what will make you an attractive hire in the field you think you want to go into.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    This is, unfortunately, untrue from an employers perspective. You will need to consider and research what will make you an attractive hire in the field you think you want to go into.
    That is not my experience.
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    (Original post by cherryred90s)
    Really? Why should she do a 4th subject?
    4 AS subjects are pretty much the norm, only having 3 when applying to competitive courses isn't really competitive at all when you have people getting AABB+ in four.

    That's assuming she wants to apply for competitive courses, if she doesn't she can stick with three.
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    (Original post by Snufkin)
    That is not my experience.
    It largely does, I have been part of the hiring process for teams I have assisted my managers in running, I have also had my own junior and seen many hires and fires in my time in a very competitive market.
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    (Original post by leavingthecity)
    It largely does, I have been part of the hiring process for teams I have assisted my managers in running, I have also had my own junior and seen many hires and fires in my time in a very competitive market.
    What sector out of interest?
 
 
 
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