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Who thinks tuition fees ar BS? watch

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    That is a myth. Experience is valued more than degrees because degrees are not as special as they once we're.

    I speak from the position of being in a graduate job with nothing higher than BTEC and experience.

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    What about applying to companies who have a filter? Some people don't even get a chance for an interview because they don't have a degree or enough UCAS points. Employers will not even bother to check or even get the chance to read through the experiences one has.

    I'm happy you found a way round it though
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    That is a myth. Experience is valued more than degrees because degrees are not as special as they once we're.

    I speak from the position of being in a graduate job with nothing higher than BTEC and experience.

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    Well it depends on what you want to do. Jobs in law and medicine require a degree and no amount of experience can make up for it.

    And like the person above has said certain jobs won't even consider you without a 2.1 and a certain amount of UCAS points


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    (Original post by Underscore__)
    Well it depends on what you want to do. Jobs in law and medicine require a degree and no amount of experience can make up for it.

    And like the person above has said certain jobs won't even consider you without a 2.1 and a certain amount of UCAS points


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    Funny you should mention law. My previous experience was gained as a fee earner in a law firm for a year.

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    (Original post by Elise213)
    What about applying to companies who have a filter? Some people don't even get a chance for an interview because they don't have a degree or enough UCAS points. Employers will not even bother to check or even get the chance to read through the experiences one has.

    I'm happy you found a way round it though
    Then it shouldn't be a company you want to work for. Before you get the wrong idea, I don't work for a small business, they have a turnover of about $50 billion.

    If a company is not willing to look at you as a person rather than a series of academic achievements then in my books they are not the sort of people I want to associate myself with.

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    underemployment (getting a job you're overqualified for) is something that anyone with any form of qualification can experience. Ultimately, tuition fees rise in line with inflation. In the long term, average degree holders earn £500,000 more in their lives compared to those who dont have a degree. At the end of the day, if you do a good degree at a top uni, you're gonna be better off than someone doing a media or english degree
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Then it shouldn't be a company you want to work for. Before you get the wrong idea, I don't work for a small business, they have a turnover of about $50 billion.

    If a company is not willing to look at you as a person rather than a series of academic achievements then in my books they are not the sort of people I want to associate myself with.

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    Professional work requires further studies and ultimately if you want to work in a competitive job, you'll need a degree. As mentioned, more and more people go into further studies, it will inevitably become harder to get a job. Of course there are ways you can be successful without one
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    Tuition fees never existed in the England a few years ago and still dont exist in Scotland and many other countries. Why does everyone act like tuition fees are essential. Its a moneymaking scam. Yes mabye some payment is needed but £9000 a year is taking the pss!
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    Last year to get £3k fees! And now grants.

    Feels good man.
    Pleb.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Then it shouldn't be a company you want to work for. Before you get the wrong idea, I don't work for a small business, they have a turnover of about $50 billion.

    If a company is not willing to look at you as a person rather than a series of academic achievements then in my books they are not the sort of people I want to associate myself with.

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    It is reasonable for the NHS to want to only train people in radiography who have a degree in physics or other revelevent form of education don;t you think?

    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Pleb.
    Here, have this rep 9k peasant.
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    I don't think they're inherently a bad idea, I believe they're a bit much and I have seen people on this forum consistently say they don't feel they get ''their money's worth'' which is always worrying.

    I am considering university abroad myself, as the cost in the UK is getting more ridiculous.
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    Such BS

    200% increase in fee's from 3 to 9k? im pretty sure that no lecturers / staff around the country saw any of that money

    im pretty sure that it doesnt cost them that much more to process student applications / information etc.

    In all fairness, ive heard a lots of information/debates on this over the years, and the consensus i have picked up is that the students paying 9k are MUCH less likely to pay back their loans, especially since the payback earning amount is more than before and graduates definitely aren't earning more money than before.

    Plus, in reality, the amount they take back is really quite small isnt it

    Turning grants into loans was an absolute c*** move on their part though
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    I fully support the current status quo.
    University education remains free at the point of entry with government-backed loans and the repayment plan on the loans include a guaranteed amount of earnings before you even have to part with any cash. This ensures that going to university has little to no negative impact on your actual finances.
    More importantly the perceived burden of paying for higher education has been shifted towards those who actually benefit from it. Cutting grants is also a highly progressive policy- an even larger loan ensures all students have more money when they actually need it (while studying) and the fact it is a loan and subsequently subject to the repayment terms means high earning graduates rightly pay back more, while students from well off but large families with stretched budgets aren't unfairly penalised.
    It always amuses me when whinging, whiney students who ***** about Tory greed and selfishness become themselves greedy and selfish when it comes to university education. The government is willing to lend people tens of thousands of pounds with highly favourable repayment terms to get ahead in life and the self-entitled sods still find a way to whinge.
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    (Original post by pol pot noodles)
    I fully support the current status quo.
    University education remains free at the point of entry with government-backed loans and the repayment plan on the loans include a guaranteed amount of earnings before you even have to part with any cash. This ensures that going to university has little to no negative impact on your actual finances.
    More importantly the perceived burden of paying for higher education has been shifted towards those who actually benefit from it. Cutting grants is also a highly progressive policy- an even larger loan ensures all students have more money when they actually need it (while studying) and the fact it is a loan and subsequently subject to the repayment terms means high earning graduates rightly pay back more, while students from well off but large families with stretched budgets aren't unfairly penalised.
    It always amuses me when whinging, whiney students who ***** about Tory greed and selfishness become themselves greedy and selfish when it comes to university education. The government is willing to lend people tens of thousands of pounds with highly favourable repayment terms to get ahead in life and the self-entitled sods still find a way to whinge.
    While i agree with this, ultimately going to university (for the 1st time) does not 'cost' you anything, the education effectively feel's 'free', so it doesn't throw off the natural education timeline.

    Why a 200% increase in fee's
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    (Original post by KungPooPanda)
    While i agree with this, ultimately going to university (for the 1st time) does not 'cost' you anything, the education effectively feel's 'free', so it doesn't throw off the natural education timeline.

    Why a 200% increase in fee's
    I believe the large increase in tuition fees was to make universities less reliant on funding from the government and to be more financially self-sufficient. The Browne Review argued this will ensure universities remain academically independent and will also essentially create a situation where students are consumers and universities are kept on their toes as they are now forced to create a high quality 'product' that the consumers want, thus increasing academic standards.
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    (Original post by ChaoticButterfly)
    It is reasonable for the NHS to want to only train people in radiography who have a degree in physics or other revelevent form of education don;t you think?
    If they have previous relevant experience and are just as capable to do as those with a degree I don't see a problem with letting non-degree applicants be taken on.
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    (Original post by under8ed)
    Professional work requires further studies and ultimately if you want to work in a competitive job, you'll need a degree. As mentioned, more and more people go into further studies, it will inevitably become harder to get a job. Of course there are ways you can be successful without one
    I already do professional work.
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    (Original post by MrsSheldonCooper)
    Don't rub it in pls.

    Genuinely considering uni abroad tbh
    Because the government won't dish out free money to you...?

    Get ****ed.

    If you study a half decent subject the debt will be paid off in no time.
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    (Original post by KungPooPanda)
    Such BS

    200% increase in fee's from 3 to 9k? im pretty sure that no lecturers / staff around the country saw any of that money

    im pretty sure that it doesnt cost them that much more to process student applications / information etc.
    ??

    The fee increase wasn't to increase universities' profits, it was to replace public funding with private. Although since the loans are government backed (and many won't be paid off), it's kind of public money anyway.
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    Ive been to two unis.

    The first was back in 2000, the first year of tuition fees at £1000. The support network at the uni was non existent, the hardship fund was empty in the first month, the library was badly stocked , lecturers weren't available out of lecture times for tutorials etc. Now that uni was Staffs so it was a bit pants anyways but still no support

    Started uni again last year with fees at £9000 and the difference is amazing. Very good support network, additional funding, library is awesome and support from lecturers is there. Its a better uni cos its trent but still its not at rg level.

    While I think 9000 is excessive it has made students more demanding and therefore pushed up standards and expectations.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Funny you should mention law. My previous experience was gained as a fee earner in a law firm for a year.

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    Well your job title wasn't fee earner. It's a vague word used in the legal industry for someone who generates income. I'll rephrase my point; you cannot be a solicitor without a degree and it'd be very difficult to get a job as a paralegal without a law degree


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