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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    This girl who was in the year above me told me that she retook the year. She got an offer from Cambridge. She made her offer. She got 3A*1A at the end of it. She does engineering or some variation of.

    Well the school posted it on the website along with the rest of the oxbridge cohort..
    If she retook the year then it was probably non-academic reasons (i.e. extenuating circumstances) or there was something else amazing in her application. Resit a whole year for academic reasons and pretty much no chance of getting in. Our department wouldn't even look twice at such an application.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    If she retook the year then it was probably non-academic reasons (i.e. extenuating circumstances) or there was something else amazing in her application. Resit a whole year for academic reasons and pretty much no chance of getting in. Our department wouldn't even look twice at such an application.
    Probably idk.

    Are you a lecturer?
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    Probably idk.

    Are you a lecturer?
    A little higher up than lecturer. But yes is a short answer.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    A little higher up than lecturer. But yes is a short answer.
    Nice.

    Do students self teaching with good grades have an improved chance of getting in to these higher universities - I assume you are at a top 5 one?

    I have heard that igcses and gcses are acknowledged as being the same, is this true? From doing both in my time, igcses are much harder than the regular gcses.

    May I also ask out of interest, why is there disdain amongst those retaking? Is it that they would be unable to cope with the demands of the degree, having not being able to do with a levels?
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    As far I know, in Edexcel A Levels, they don't mention the amount of resits you've taken on your certificate.
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    Nice.

    Do students self teaching with good grades have an improved chance of getting in to these higher universities - I assume you are at a top 5 one?
    Improved chance to what?

    I have heard that igcses and gcses are acknowledged as being the same, is this true? From doing both in my time, igcses are much harder than the regular gcses.
    Doesn't matter which to be honest. A levels far more important.

    May I also ask out of interest, why is there disdain amongst those retaking? Is it that they would be unable to cope with the demands of the degree, having not being able to do with a levels?
    Because if you are retaking for academic reasons then you are probably not good enough. For the top students A level should be an absolute breeze. Impossible to do poorly academically in for such students. Many of our students self teach themselves to a much higher level than A level, often several years before. Such students do not screw up A levels. As I said in an earlier post a "bad day at the office" for such students is 97% UMS average across all modules.
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    (Original post by SaadKaleem)
    As far I know, in Edexcel A Levels, they don't mention the amount of resits you've taken on your certificate.
    But we know if it took someone 3 years or more to gather all their A levels. And the info in the UCAS application. If we get an application from someone in September 2012 and then they reappear in 2016 with some new A levels what do you think we think?
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    But we know if it took someone 3 years or more to gather all their A levels. And the info in the UCAS application. If we get an application from someone in September 2012 and then they reappear in 2016 with some new A levels what do you think we think?
    Oh, I'm not in UK so, I'm unaware of UCAS.
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    (Original post by SaadKaleem)
    Oh, I'm not in UK so, I'm unaware of UCAS.
    It is the admissions service that you use to apply touniversites in UK.
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    (Original post by Mihael_Keehl)
    It is the admissions service that you use to apply touniversites in UK.
    Yes, I know about it briefly, I have never used it or looked into it.
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    I thought there were a few medical schools that accepted resists. Not 100% sure though. I'm also resitting.
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    For science subjects in particular, it doesn't as long as you meet the requirements.
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    For med schools the resit policies are summarised here: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...Resit_Policies

    Although it's worth pointing out that all universities consider people who realise they choose the wrong A level subjects in Yr 12 and restart sixth form with new subjects in a very different light to students who studied the same A level subjects over 3 years.

    Cambridge outright state that they're comfortable with applicants resitting some modules http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...irements-facts
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    (Original post by PQ)
    Although it's worth pointing out that all universities consider people who realise they choose the wrong A level subjects in Yr 12 and restart sixth form with new subjects in a very different light to students who studied the same A level subjects over 3 years.
    That is what I consider an extenuating circumstance.
    Cambridge outright state that they're comfortable with applicants resitting some modules
    But it should be noted it weakens the application if resits are taken for "grade grubbing" to use a US phrase. People who take resits for academic reasons are going to be the very bottom of the pile in getting offers and may end up getting an offer that is harder one to qualify for.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    That is what I consider an extenuating circumstance.

    But it should be noted it weakens the application if resits are taken for "grade grubbing" to use a US phrase. People who take resits for academic reasons are going to be the very bottom of the pile in getting offers and may end up getting an offer that is harder one to qualify for.
    The admissions staff posting on TSR seem perfectly happy for people to resit in order to make it easier to meet their offer/meet the standard offer.

    Cambridge are very keen on encouraging as many students as possible to apply for a place - is there a reason that you're trying to do the opposite?
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    (Original post by PQ)
    The admissions staff posting on TSR seem perfectly happy for people to resit in order to make it easier to meet their offer/meet the standard offer.

    Cambridge are very keen on encouraging as many students as possible to apply for a place - is there a reason that you're trying to do the opposite?
    I am just stating the facts. Whether it my my current department (where I have been the faculty member dealing with undergraduate admissions) or my former department at the school you just mentioned - those who take resits for academic reasons are ranked lower in our eyes than those who do not. We almost never get people with any resits applying but I do know when they do they seldom get a realistic offer.

    Why are you, someone who obviously is not in an Oxbridge department sowing false seeds of hope?

    Just because we want more and varied applicants does not mean resits are the way to go about it. I can't speak directly for humanities departments but resits for maths and physics etc. is not exactly a path to be taken. The exception where the resits aren't for improving grades in the same A levels.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    I am just stating the facts. Whether it my my current department (where I have been the faculty member dealing with undergraduate admissions) or my former department at the school you just mentioned - those who take resits for academic reasons are ranked lower in our eyes than those who do not. We almost never get people with any resits applying but I do know when they do they seldom get a realistic offer.

    Why are you, someone who obviously is not in an Oxbridge department sowing false seeds of hope?

    Just because we want more and varied applicants does not mean resits are the way to go about it. I can't speak directly for humanities departments but resits for maths and physics etc. is not exactly a path to be taken. The exception where the resits aren't for improving grades in the same A levels.
    I think you're misunderstanding the way the words resit (resitting modules, usually within yr 12 and yr 13) and retake (taking an additional year to resit a large number of modules) are used on TSR and by applicants.

    Resitting modules is something Cambridge admissions tutors have stated repeatedly on TSR as something they aren't bothered about either way - in fact a some of them have encouraged applicants with offers who want to resit AS modules in order to more easily meet their offer conditions (http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7#post62186187 ). It's not false hope if it's something encouraged by staff who know more about the current admissions preferences that either you or me.

    If that isn't the case at your specific department at your specific university then it would be useful if you could share which department that is and whether it's specific to your subject or applies to the entire university. I'm not aware of any departments or universities with the policy you state of throwing out any resit applications but maybe you can direct me to something that makes it clear to applicants resitting modules that they'd be wasting a choice in applying there (in line with the recommendations from the Schwarz report).
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    (Original post by PQ)
    I think you're misunderstanding the way the words resit (resitting modules, usually within yr 12 and yr 13) and retake (taking an additional year to resit a large number of modules) are used on TSR and by applicants.

    Resitting modules is something Cambridge admissions tutors have stated repeatedly on TSR as something they aren't bothered about either way - in fact a some of them have encouraged applicants with offers who want to resit AS modules in order to more easily meet their offer conditions (http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/show...7#post62186187 ). It's not false hope if it's something encouraged by staff who know more about the current admissions preferences that either you or me.
    I was one of those staff at Cambridge once and still talk to those who are in my field. And resits are frowned upon to the point of being bottom of the pile. Maybe some humanities departments need the warm bodies but not in my area. You resit modules to improve grades and you are bottom of the pile when it comes to possibly getting an offer.

    If that isn't the case at your specific department at your specific university then it would be useful if you could share which department that is and whether it's specific to your subject or applies to the entire university. I'm not aware of any departments or universities with the policy you state of throwing out any resit applications but maybe you can direct me to something that makes it clear to applicants resitting modules that they'd be wasting a choice in applying there (in line with the recommendations from the Schwarz report).
    There is no official policy but I'll tell you right now there is effectively a tossing out of such applications unless someone murders admissions test and has other outstanding features of their application. Almost all our applicants are A*A*A*A* or A*A*A*A and never a resit in sight anyway.
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    (Original post by pvaz6965)
    I was one of those staff at Cambridge once and still talk to those who are in my field. And resits are frowned upon to the point of being bottom of the pile. Maybe some humanities departments need the warm bodies but not in my area. You resit modules to improve grades and you are bottom of the pile when it comes to possibly getting an offer.
    So you're giving blanket advice contrary to the admissions staff representing another university based on a limited understanding of admissions outside your area and hearsay.

    There is no official policy but I'll tell you right now there is effectively a tossing out of such applications unless someone murders admissions test and has other outstanding features of their application. Almost all our applicants are A*A*A*A* or A*A*A*A and never a resit in sight anyway.
    And your employer is routinely selecting based on unofficial policy.

    Wow. So much for transparency.

    Good luck the next time the QAA come calling.
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    (Original post by Ladymusiclover)
    I thought there were a few medical schools that accepted resists. Not 100% sure though. I'm also resitting.
    It depends on what you mean by resitting. Nearly all medical schools are fine with resits within the standard two-year period, although your application will be affected where AS grades are heavily used in the process (e.g. Cambridge).

    Outside the two years, the number of medical schools to which you could apply without extenuating circumstances whittles down to just a handful, and all but one of them (Exeter) stipulate minimum first-attempt grades, usually either AAB or ABB. With extenuating circumstances, most medical schools are fine with it, although a lot of them (e.g. Imperial, Cardiff) will ask for evidence of these before you've applied and tell you whether it's acceptable to them.

    More detailed information in this link that PQ posted earlier: http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki...Resit_Policies.
 
 
 
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