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    (Original post by flutterby-x303)
    I think it is extremely important that all three of the sciences be taught up to GCSE at least. Science explains how things work. It's pretty much all facts (and plausible theories) in comparison to humanities where it's all opinions. This makes it worthwhile studying in my opinion as you are learning about things that might be brought up in a discussion over dinner or a quiz for example.

    More importantly science is everything. Biology you are learning about your own body and the science behind how it works. The human body is very complex and incredibly clever and you should respect that and take in some of the knowledge as to why the body does certain things. You also have plant biology and without plants we die so it's important to be aware of that side of science too.

    Chemistry explains how reactions happen and bodily reactions. While you may not see it as being as directly applicable as say biology it's fascinating and a basic understanding of gcse topics will set you well for life.

    Physics again is such an important subject and you see physics happening in your everyday life.

    Science is such a broad term and most schools divide it into those three said subjects so to suggest a curriculum where no one of those subjects were taught is completely ludicrous. I would go so far as to say that the sciences are the most valuable subjects anyone can learn and without them the average intelligence of a student will be significantly lower.
    Ok, I am aware that science is literally the world we live in, but just because science is mostly facts compared to humanities which are mostly 'opinion' (your words..) doesn't make humanities such as History a less helpful qualification. Besides, apart from the odd essay, how are humanities mostly 'opinions'? My History syllabus is completely factual, and none of it is opinion based.
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    I really enjoyed science - Chemistry and biology anyway. I'd have taken Chemistry as well as biology to higher level but I really struggle with maths. I have a great admiration for those who understand it but I had to work my butt off to get Nat 5. I was scared in case my problems with maths would impact on my ability to do well at H chem so I just did higher biology. I was so bad at maths that when I got a B at Nat 5 my teacher dashed up to me when I was standing in reception with some of my friends and loudly congratulated me on the pass. My friends - all had As and were a bit put out that she didn't congratulate them on their award. It was the hardest work ever for me. She understood that.
    Science is part of a well rounded education and maybe it's because you can't waffle your way through it that some students would shy away from it if it wasn't compulsory. Maybe?
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    (Original post by sailormood)
    I think it's just for general knowledge in all honesty. I did 21stC science at GCSE so it was applicable to everyday life and I do understand things in the news a lot better now too!
    Exactly; I don't understand how balancing a chemistry equation will help me or many other non-scientific people in life. It's unfortunate that this 'general knowledge ' will be looked upon when applying for university, as the syllabus helps you get the grades but nothing else applicable to future life.
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Ok, I am aware that science is literally the world we live in, but just because science is mostly facts compared to humanities which are mostly 'opinion' (your words..) doesn't make humanities such as History a less helpful qualification. Besides, apart from the odd essay, how are humanities mostly 'opinions'? My History syllabus is completely factual, and none of it is opinion based.
    Ok in your essay you will probably mention a mixture of facts and opinions. History has a lot of facts ie dates, notable people and events etc that definitely occurred but the level of detail and percentage of facts that science subjects behold is far greater. I think science and history etc should be kept in the syllabus and subjects like food tech and music should be removed. The Sciences just seem too good to scrap completely. There are far less superior subjects that we can do without.
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    The only real compulsory subjects are currently maths and English. I think English should be compulsory until the end of year 6(when it ceases to be useful) and maths should be compulsory until at least foundation GCSE. I also think science should be compulsory as well, to at least double GCSE.
    Also, ICT, history and geography should be compulsory at primary school. Other than that, everything should be optional.
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    (Original post by DougallnDougall)
    I really enjoyed science - Chemistry and biology anyway. I'd have taken Chemistry as well as biology to higher level but I really struggle with maths. I have a great admiration for those who understand it but I had to work my butt off to get Nat 5. I was scared in case my problems with maths would impact on my ability to do well at H chem so I just did higher biology. I was so bad at maths that when I got a B at Nat 5 my teacher dashed up to me when I was standing in reception with some of my friends and loudly congratulated me on the pass. My friends - all had As and were a bit put out that she didn't congratulate them on their award. It was the hardest work ever for me. She understood that.
    Science is part of a well rounded education and maybe it's because you can't waffle your way through it that some students would shy away from it if it wasn't compulsory. Maybe?
    Possibly, as I'm sure many students would shy away from it if it weren't compulsory, but as I have said on a previous reply, I learned probably about 35% of what is on the GCSE syllabus during KS3. And to be truthful, I have forgotten pretty much everything else that we learned, and I feel like this will happen after I complete my GCSE's. It's not as though we have received no prior knowledge to science beforehand, and in my opinion two GCSEs in a course of study I don't want to do does not benefit me fully. (Sorry if this reply doesn't make full sense, I am having trouble writing out my many thoughts on this matter )
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    (Original post by flutterby-x303)
    Ok in your essay you will probably mention a mixture of facts and opinions. History has a lot of facts ie dates, notable people and events etc that definitely occurred but the level of detail and percentage of facts that science subjects behold is far greater. I think science and history etc should be kept in the syllabus and subjects like food tech and music should be removed. The Sciences just seem too good to scrap completely. There are far less superior subjects that we can do without.
    But why are music and food technology 'useless'? Surely food technology is one of the most helpful subjects you will ever learn? I can understand with music, but getting rid of subjects based off of 'superiority' wouldn't benefit many people who aren't as capable in more academic subjects.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    The only real compulsory subjects are currently maths and English. I think English should be compulsory until the end of year 6(when it ceases to be useful) and maths should be compulsory until at least foundation GCSE. I also think science should be compulsory as well, to at least double GCSE.
    Also, ICT, history and geography should be compulsory at primary school. Other than that, everything should be optional.
    I'm just curious, why do you think science should be compulsory up to GCSE level whereas ICT, for example, shouldn't be?
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    The entire world is now based on Science, from Physics to Chemistry to Computing and Engineering. Education in the sciences is much more important than education in the arts because Science affects almost every single thing we do, and if the Sciences weren't compulsory at a young age I doubt many people would study them and then Science and civilisation would suffer because of it
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    As someone who has found himself explaining really basic scientific concepts to adults, has had to address idiotic statements like "but evolution is only a theory" or explain why "my grandma smoked 60 a day and lived until she was 90" is not counter argument to the research on lung cancer, I don't think the problem is that science is compulsory. The problem is that far too many kids leave school with a stunted level of scientific education.

    I think the major problem is that science is approached at school by just trying to shove facts into kids minds without encouraging them to think critically. Not only is it boring, but it creates adults that are easily confused by anything scientific related. They are the sort of adults who readily accept Daily Mail headlines like "puppies cause cancer".
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Possibly, as I'm sure many students would shy away from it if it weren't compulsory, but as I have said on a previous reply, I learned probably about 35% of what is on the GCSE syllabus during KS3. And to be truthful, I have forgotten pretty much everything else that we learned, and I feel like this will happen after I complete my GCSE's. It's not as though we have received no prior knowledge to science beforehand, and in my opinion two GCSEs in a course of study I don't want to do does not benefit me fully. (Sorry if this reply doesn't make full sense, I am having trouble writing out my many thoughts on this matter )
    Knowledge is power! I agree formulae etc will be forgotten but some parts of what you learned will be there in the back of your head. At the end of the day it's about having a good all round education and yeah def tough if you haven't a leaning towards it. If you didn't have compulsory science do you think most young teens would have the maturity to pick challenging subjects notwithstanding that there are such things as late bloomers, especially boys who might have hidden talent in the sciences they didn't realise? Like for instance my dad was a late bloomer. Till about 14 was always bottom of his class. He gradually started creeping up his forms and eventually he left Edinburgh with a first in maths and chemistry. Ha ha he thought I might do the same but that one was not to be!
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    But why are music and food technology 'useless'? Surely food technology is one of the most helpful subjects you will ever learn? I can understand with music, but getting rid of subjects based off of 'superiority' wouldn't benefit many people who aren't as capable in more academic subjects.
    Re food tech, the only good thing is you get to make yummy things to eat at the end of the day. Oh and the video clearly made in the 90s showing what happens to animals when they are slaughtered, that's a good one. Made me become vegetarian for a few months when I was 14.

    No but seriously anyone can follow a recipe they don't need to be taught this at school.
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    Firstly the electorate need to be educated in order to make sensible decisions. No, this is not going to require you to calculate the escape velocity from Earth, or describe the working of a Michelson-Morley inteferometer, but it is important that people can make decisions based out of fact rather than the irrational fears that tend to develop towards things they do not understand, e.g. Ebola, vaccination and nuclear power safety.

    Secondly, life's full of stuff you won't like but will be forced to do any way. Situations like this are, in my opinion, character building.
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    You learn the sciences because they are important to humanity. The curriculum isn't designed for you, it is for the whole generation, why create a generation of people who know nothing about the world because they never had to learn about it?
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    I'm just curious, why do you think science should be compulsory up to GCSE level whereas ICT, for example, shouldn't be?
    You learn pretty much everything useful in ICT at primary school if you didn't know it already. At secondary school we learned a few more advanced features of Excel and Powerpoint and the absolute basics of Access, but nothing particularly important. It ended up just being a waste of 3.5 years. If you need to know how to do any of it you can just Google it and find out in mere moments. On the other hand to apply your GCSE knowledge you need to get hold of a product key and install the ancient versions you used at school(assuming they even run on modern software), then remember exactly how to do it(often with minimal efficiency compared with newer versions).
    Science on the other hand gives you the foundation of an understanding of the universe. Of course at GCSE it's not deep at all, but it's still a basic understanding which I believe everyone should have.
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    I don't honestly know why, as it wasn't when my parents were at school back in the days of O-levels. Perhaps it came in with GCSEs?

    In any case, if I were in power (actual power, rather than my TSR Prime Minister power trip that in any case runs out on Monday – don't forget to vote in the election folks) I would make a larger range of subjects compulsory at GCSE level, including an MFL and a humanities subject.
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    At my school Information Technology GCSE was compulsory. Religious studies was compulsary at my brothers school. It's handy to have a computer qualification, but Religion should be optional. To the question why science is compulsary. There are a lot of jobs that need science I.e. Engineering, teaching, nursing, scientist, forensic scientists, vets, vet nurses, doctors, dentists, lab technicians, pharmacists, possible more professions need it. It's clearly an important qualification to have...
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    (Original post by george_c00per)
    Hi,

    I was just wondering what everyone's thoughts are on science. This may be a little bit biased, as I hate science, but I've always wondered why it's compulsory.

    I personally think that it's pointless as the topics covered will bear no resemblance to problems I face in real life. I know, for scientists, that it would, but I have already chosen my A Levels and know what I will be doing for the next few years.

    Also, you may say that it's to give you an all round education, however art subjects aren't forced, and either are languages at some schools.

    I am aware that compulsory science only goes up to GCSE, however I am sure that universities will still look at my science grades, despite it being unrelated to my course of study.

    Please give your opinion, as I am up to discussion and debate.
    Because if it wasn't we would still have people believing the earth is flat, that being out in cold weather can give you a cold and that walking under a ladder curses you

    Oh, and how could I forget the marvellous anti-vaxxers?
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    If you need to ask why you need an education - then education for you is a waste of taxpayers money.

    ROFLMAO @ people who don't know why English Literature, Science and Mathematics are compulsory.
 
 
 
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