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Have you ever had depression? watch

  • View Poll Results: Have you ever had depression?
    Yes
    788
    56.57%
    No
    439
    31.51%
    No- but I have experienced other mental health issues
    166
    11.92%

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    Still suffering with major depression. Also have anxiety to a serious degree where I find most if not all social confrontations and conversations seriously difficult to participate in. Aaaand I am also recovering from anorexia which was onset by the loss of appetite during depression. Weighed just less than 6 stone at 14, was 5'11.
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    (Original post by ArtisanQueen)
    Yes, I am currently suffering from it right now.
    Sorry to hear that, have you spoken to anyone at your college/uni or gone to see a GP? It's really common and you don't have to deal with it alone
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    (Original post by aamirac)
    Which they have said they have been diagnosed with it. By a professional. You're right, it's not a joke, so don't make such snarky comments on a topic like this. It's rather rude and inconsiderate for those that have to face it.
    Possibly. We don't know that, because that wasn't the question. The poster was speaking out against people trivialising actual depression by claiming to have been depressed on the basis that they've been sad, which is entirely right.

    This is why I said it would be interesting to know how many of the apparently 60% of posters who have so far answered the poll were diagnosed, but apparently that's a bad thing to say because my post was deleted.

    (Original post by Bath_Student)
    lol, as of right now 60% of TSR users have depression, what a joke...Feeling sad for a few minutes is normal; however, it does not equate to depression. Damnit.
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    It's sad how many people on here have suffered from depression.
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    I have no idea where the distinction between depression and depression - and eeyore syndrome etc. - falls. If someone is sad on a long-term basis because they hate their job and their symptoms match major depression, but leaving that job and starting their dream job would dispel it entirely, is that major depression? To say it is seems to me to say that someone in a permanent state of anxiety as a result of something directly causing that anxiety suffers from an anxiety disorder, and I think that a lot of people who claim to suffer from major depression are in fact 'depressed' on a long-term basis for equivalent reasons. I think in order for the term to mean anything, these situations should be excluded. It should be a condition that has no everyday cause.
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    Nah neverr
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    (Original post by a noble chance)
    I have no idea where the distinction between depression and depression falls

    I was diagnosed and others have asked me if I am but I am not sure it was depression. The worst thing about this illness is perhaps that it is so hard to accurately detect

    I am not sure if it is overdiagnosed or underdiagnosed and neither is anyone else.
    Difference between sadness and depression is that one is a mood and the other is an emotion.

    Emotions, like sadness, come and go, they're pretty short, generally in response to an event (e.g. bereavement, rejection from a university, etc.). Moods, like depression, are long-lasting and not really in response to any events, though that doesn't mean that events can't trigger things like a mood disorder (they're stressors), but they're not what "keeps it going". Essentially, depression is a disability and sadness isn't. You, more often than not, need professional/medical help to get better from an episode of depression and that generally isn't needed if you're "just" sad.

    It may be overdiagnosed as there are a lot of different disorders and generally, most people who go to their GP about their mental health never see a psychiatrist/psychologist. GP's don't have enough knowledge to properly diagnose outside of things like depression and anxiety, so depression and/or anxiety the labels people are generally given. Having said that, even those who work in mental health don't always get it right. Most mental health diagnoses are classed as "working diagnoses" as they're subject to change. This is probably because there are no specific tests to test for things like depression, schizophrenia, etc.

    Does that make sense?
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    (Original post by Pathway)
    Difference between sadness and depression is that one is a mood and the other is an emotion.

    Emotions, like sadness, come and go, they're pretty short, generally in response to an event (e.g. bereavement, rejection from a university, etc.). Moods, like depression, are long-lasting and not really in response to any events, though that doesn't mean that events can't trigger things like a mood disorder (they're stressors), but they're not what "keeps it going". Essentially, depression is a disability and sadness isn't. You, more often than not, need professional/medical help to get better from an episode of depression and that generally isn't needed if you're "just" sad.
    I didn't mean I don't understand the dictionary definition.

    It may be overdiagnosed as there are a lot of different disorders and generally, most people who go to their GP about their mental health never see a psychiatrist/psychologist. GP's don't have enough knowledge to properly diagnose outside of things like depression and anxiety, so depression and/or anxiety the labels people are generally given. Having said that, even those who work in mental health don't always get it right. Most mental health diagnoses are classed as "working diagnoses" as they're subject to change. This is probably because there are no specific tests to test for things like depression, schizophrenia, etc.

    Does that make sense?
    It may also be underdiagnosed because people don't go to their GP in the first place, especially the case for men which probably contributes to their higher rates of alcoholism and suicide. I've updated my post also.
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    I do agree with the sentiments that perhaps this poll will not be as accurate as we might hope. Perhaps a closer representation would be "Have you ever been diagnosed with depression". Although that leaves out those genuinely suffering with it in silence, it also cancels out those who equate 'feeling sad and stressed at exam time' with it.
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    (Original post by aamirac)
    Which they have said they have been diagnosed with it. By a professional. You're right, it's not a joke, so don't make such snarky comments on a topic like this. It's rather rude and inconsiderate for those that have to face it.
    (Original post by Nadile)
    Do you really think that this sample is representative of the entire TSR? Due to the title, the people who have had to deal with depression are the most likely to come to this thread and actually vote. People who never even thought about it will rarely vote here, which is why the percentage is so high.
    Roughly 80,000 children and young people in the UK were diagnosed with severe depression in 2004 (1.4% of 11-16 y/o). This number rises to 11.5% of 11-16 y/o when accounting for all mental health disorders. Recent statistics suggest that around 20% of all Americans (different country, similar social and psychological makeup) will suffer from symptoms of depression at some point in their lives. Even accounting for the rise in cases over the past decade, plus the possible biases of the polling on this website, do you really think 57% of people here have suffered depression (69% suffered some kind of other disorder)? That would be an extreme outlier on official statistics.
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    Seeing how many of my friends have depression and how it affects them, I am super grateful that I haven't had it yet. I do, however, struggle with OCD (Yes, actual OCD), so I know the pains of having a mental illness and can easily sympathise with those that have other mental illnesses. Mental illness needs far more awareness than it currently has - for far too long we've secluded mentally ill people from society. Awareness has increased over recent years, which is great to see, but there is still a long way to go.
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    I have experienced/continue to experience severe depressive episodes as part of my schizoaffective disorder (which in my case, is the depressive type).

    (Original post by Queen Cersei)
    If you have any ideas on how colleges and unis could help their students out more with mental health, post them below!
    I think all unis and colleges need to ensure there is enough welfare provision for their institution (obviously things like size of the student body will affect how big a welfare team needs/has to be) and that the people in those positions are properly screened and properly trained. Aside from the college chaplain (who received pastoral training as part of his ministerial training), none of the welfare team in my undergraduate institution had been screened or trained. This can - and did, in my case - lead to situations which further isolate or endanger already vulnerable students
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    Depression sucks, but you can get over it.
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    (Original post by Queen Cersei)
    That's interesting that you didn't feel you wanted to follow up due to the meds, it is definitely something GPs will suggest but they should also offer you counselling services on the NHS which might be worthwhile if you still struggle at times.

    Have you found others ways to cope when you feel you are going through a bout of depression? Anything you could recommend for others?
    I just didn't like the idea of relying on meds, I felt it would be better if I tried to deal with it myself (I also knew it wasn't so severe that I'd need meds).

    I find having people to talk to and around you helps. Sometimes we isolate ourselves in those situations which only makes things worse imo. It helps hearing a different view on things and just letting it all out.
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    Diagnosed with borderline personality disorder last year, and I've went over my head to try and get over it. Proud to say that I am doing much, much better now and hopefully will have myself under control by the time September comes by and I'm off to uni.
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    No, I wouldn't say I've ever had it.

    With A-Levels and everything right now I'm not happy, but that's a temporary thing - I know that there's 'light at the end of the tunnel' so to speak.

    I have multiple friends who suffer from it though as well as others with personality disorders, who have been diagnosed. I do think that there's a danger in self-diagnosis in that it can undermine actual cases.
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    (Original post by Queen Cersei)
    Sorry to hear that, have you spoken to anyone at your college/uni or gone to see a GP? It's really common and you don't have to deal with it alone
    Pfffftttttt....... the college has been one of my main causes of the depression I am currently suffering from! :unimpressed:

    The staff there ganged up to bully me and cause me to no longer be on my course I was so much enjoying by telling lies about me! :banghead: :mad:

    My GP just keeps giving unhelpful, scripted answers. :sadnod:
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    Studying Psyc (at least for AS), I actually find the statistics interesting. Just a speculation but the majority voting yes is doing so because the exam period is approaching? (I mean it'd dead obvious, but I wont derail this and say why)

    Yeah I suppose to some extent. A month back I felt depression now I feel... nothing? If that even makes sense. I don't feel happy, sad, worried or anxious. Just plain I suppose? It lets me get on with everyday things but it hinders my ability to feel sympathy for others. And recently it slowed down my motivation to do work. Eh I usually let these things pass but it's sort of ongoing, unsure of what I should do frankly.

    Interested to hear if others feel nothing as well? Might just be me...
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    Fortunately not. Bits of anxiety have cropped in recent years though.
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    Yes, I had severe depression for all of my school life due to bullying and low self esteem. Was suicidal for a year and nearly hospitalised. I was put on medication and have been off of it for 8 months. I still have very low moments and severe apathy but don't want to go back on the drugs.
 
 
 
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