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    (Original post by nasilemak)
    Hello, Im from Malaysia and Im planning to study Law in Bristol University. Im curious about the possibility for me to get a job in UK after graduating.

    I got rejected from LSE with a 4A's for As results and 4A* predicted grades for overall A Levels with a decent personal statement (according to my lecturers and personal statement advisers) . This is very disappointing because I know that being a LSE graduate will definitely give me a better chance to find a job in UK under such competition in the market.

    So my question is, will Bristol be worth it for me, if one of my priorities is to get a job in UK after graduating.

    Anyway, I got offers from Nottingham, Warwick and Birmingham too, are any of them better than Bristol?
    You need to revise how recruitment here is done mate. It's not a case of just slapping down your universities name on a CV then magically ending up with a graduate job - not even an Oxford grad can do that. To be competitive in the job market, you need to be able to show evidence of work experience, extra curricular involvement, understanding of whichever role(s) you're applying to and above all, being a personable human being.

    Going to LSE over Bristol will not drastically increase your chances because that's not the important aspect of a job application. The premise of your question needs revision as you seem to think it's the university (by itself) you go to that lands you a job..

    Regardless, they are all fine institutions. None of them will be tossed aside as 'not being good enough' in a CV screen. Although, if front office investment banking is a possible avenue of interest, Warwick would boost your chances (for that field) as they are heavily targeted by firms.

    In summary: change your mindset mate, getting a job is not an automatic process determined by university league table positions. Choose where you want to go based on the environment, course and any extra opportunities available (study abroad, specific societies etc); enjoy the three to four years at uni but always look for opportunities to beef up your CV if you want to stand a chance for a grad job.



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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    I accept that. However, if the OP is really concerned, they can contact Bristol for themselves and find out the percentage of students being given a 2.1 or above. Arguing about it on the thread isn't helping the OP, especially as some posters are getting to the point of rudeness.
    This information is available on the internet from an official source:

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec...eturnTo/Search

    9% of students get a 1st and 74% get a 2:1.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    This information is available on the internet from an official source:

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec...eturnTo/Search

    9% of students get a 1st and 74% get a 2:1.
    Well, everyone can stop arguing about it now then!

    I still think that for the OP, the biggest barrier to getting a job will be visa restrictions/issues rather than degree grade or where he goes to university.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    Well, everyone can stop arguing about it now then!

    I still think that for the OP, the biggest barrier to getting a job will be visa restrictions/issues rather than degree grade or where he goes to university.
    Probably but those things don't depend on which university he goes to so they are irrelevant considerations in answering the question he asked.

    Probability of getting a 1st/2:1 is a relevant consideration.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Probably but those things don't depend on which university he goes to so they are irrelevant considerations in answering the question he asked.

    Probability of getting a 1st/2:1 is a relevant consideration.
    The thing about law is that it's far more country specific than other courses. If your chances of getting a job in the UK are pretty small after graduation regardless of grades or university attended, then you need to seriously consider whether getting a law degree in the UK is the right option for you.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    The thing about law is that it's far more country specific than other courses. If your chances of getting a job in the UK are pretty small after graduation regardless of grades or university attended, then you need to seriously consider whether getting a law degree in the UK is the right option for you.
    That might be true.

    But what he has asked is not whether he should study in the UK or Malaysia but rather whether he should go to Bristol, Nottingham, Warwick, or Birmingham.

    I don't have any specialist knowledge of the law sector but my prejudice would be to say the one that offers the highest chance of a 2.1/1st.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    The thing about law is that it's far more country specific than other courses. If your chances of getting a job in the UK are pretty small after graduation regardless of grades or university attended, then you need to seriously consider whether getting a law degree in the UK is the right option for you.
    OP isn't restricted to just training contracts/pupillages. They can apply to whichever industry interests them seeing as 70% of grad jobs don't state a degree preference.

    Plus, there are 300 - 400 ish employers out there that are at a large enough size to be able to sponsor a work visa.

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    OP hasn't been online since I pointed out the visa issue, so all this may well be moot.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    That might be true.

    But what he has asked is not whether he should study in the UK or Malaysia but rather whether he should go to Bristol, Nottingham, Warwick, or Birmingham.

    I don't have any specialist knowledge of the law sector but my prejudice would be to say the one that offers the highest chance of a 2.1/1st.
    In law, compared to other sectors the university you go to does make a lot more of a difference, although obviously getting a 2.1 or a First is important too.

    Obviously the OP can correct me if he understands the changes to the Tier 4 visa which make getting a job in the UK much harder, but as these changes only came fully into play in 2015, I think a lot of international applicants aren't aware of them yet.

    (Original post by Princepieman)
    OP isn't restricted to just training contracts/pupillages. They can apply to whichever industry interests them seeing as 70% of grad jobs don't state a degree preference.

    Plus, there are 300 - 400 ish employers out there that are at a large enough size to be able to sponsor a work visa.

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    There have been a lot of changes to the visa system recently, and my understanding is that these have made switching from a Tier 4 visa to a Tier 2 visa harder than it was previously. There's also been changes to Tier 2 visas which can make switching jobs in the UK much harder.

    There's a lot of restrictions on the type of work that you can get a Tier 2 visa for- it's not as simple as just having a graduate job. Usually, the lowest wage you can be paid is £20,800, for example, which would rule out a number of graduate jobs. The employer also usually has to satisfy the resident labour market test- basically, the employer has to employ a suitable UK applicant before they can offer/advertise the job to non-EU applicants. For many "graduate jobs" I think this would be very difficult to do.

    It's not impossible, but it's not easy either.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    In law, compared to other sectors the university you go to does make a lot more of a difference, although obviously getting a 2.1 or a First is important too.
    Does it make a difference between those four? As I said I have no subject-specific knowledge here but in general terms there is not much difference between those universities. Of course there is a difference between Oxford and Lancaster.

    Obviously the OP can correct me if he understands the changes to the Tier 4 visa which make getting a job in the UK much harder, but as these changes only came fully into play in 2015, I think a lot of international applicants aren't aware of them yet.
    I am not saying this is an unimportant consideration, it just isn't the question he asked.
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    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    In


    There have been a lot of changes to the visa system recently, and my understanding is that these have made switching from a Tier 4 visa to a Tier 2 visa harder than it was previously. There's also been changes to Tier 2 visas which can make switching jobs in the UK much harder.

    There's a lot of restrictions on the type of work that you can get a Tier 2 visa for- it's not as simple as just having a graduate job. Usually, the lowest wage you can be paid is £20,800, for example, which would rule out a number of graduate jobs. The employer also usually has to satisfy the resident labour market test- basically, the employer has to employ a suitable UK applicant before they can offer/advertise the job to non-EU applicants. For many "graduate jobs" I think this would be very difficult to do.

    It's not impossible, but it's not easy either.
    I'm aware about the changes but that £20.8k floor is still pretty generous and a lot of grad jobs in London for instance will pay considerably more than that. As for the test, large companies have several means of bypassing that. One may include creating a job ad geared specifically to the international students in question (such that it rules out most people from applying), advertising it for a few days/weeks then taking it down.

    At the end of the day, if OP has what it takes to get into the large employers here in the UK, they should be alright with any visa issues.
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    (Original post by Carnationlilyrose)
    OP hasn't been online since I pointed out the visa issue, so all this may well be moot.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    This information is available on the internet from an official source:

    http://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subjec...eturnTo/Search

    9% of students get a 1st and 74% get a 2:1.
    And here's a comparison for all four unis (final results not specifically first year...)

    Name:  Screen Shot 2016-02-29 at 15.24.46.jpg
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    Warwick looks nice in that comparison.
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Does it make a difference between those four? As I said I have no subject-specific knowledge here but in general terms there is not much difference between those universities. Of course there is a difference between Oxford and Lancaster.


    I am not saying this is an unimportant consideration, it just isn't the question he asked.
    Law isn't my area of expertise and I think things change all the time, but until fairly recently the consensus was if you wanted to be a really competitive job applicant you wanted to go to a top 20 (for law) uni. I would say there isn't much to choose from between Bristol and Nottingham (although Bristol's name is perhaps slightly more prestigious) but going to one of these would give you an advantage over Birmingham and Warwick who are sort of hovering on the edge of being top 20 but going to one of these would still be better than going to somewhere like Liverpool/Surrey/Sheffield, which while being Russel Group universities are not really that well rated for law.

    Basically, law is a very competitive/traditional field, and so when top firms have hundreds of well qualified, experienced applicants applying, the university you went to can matter a lot.

    Obviously, a law degree can be really useful in other graduate jobs- it's not a vocational degree, so a 2.1 in Law from Birmingham is still going to help your employability at lot.

    It also depends what you want to do, if you're aiming to be a small town solicitor or happy working as a paralegal for while to get additional experience then the uni you go to may matter a lot less. However, for an international applicant, these may not be options open to them because they need the company to sponsor them for a Tier 2 visa, and this won't be easy when there are so many well qualified applicants?

    Also, the OP does say that one of his priorities is getting a job in the UK after graduating, so I think it's fair enough to explain some of the reasons why this might be difficult regardless.

    (Original post by Princepieman)
    I'm aware about the changes but that £20.8k floor is still pretty generous and a lot of grad jobs in London for instance will pay considerably more than that. As for the test, large companies have several means of bypassing that. One may include creating a job ad geared specifically to the international students in question (such that it rules out most people from applying), advertising it for a few days/weeks then taking it down.

    At the end of the day, if OP has what it takes to get into the large employers here in the UK, they should be alright with any visa issues.
    This isn't legal anymore, the job has to be advertised (in two suitable places) for a total of 28 days. I accept there are ways for employers to specifically target international students, but most graduate recruiters won't bother. I'm not saying it's impossible but it's not easy either- and things are being made progressively harder.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    I bet you've been waiting to use that gif :lol:
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    (Original post by jneill)
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    (Original post by Observatory)
    Warwick looks nice in that comparison.
    I find it hard to believe *nobody* gets a 2:2 from Warwick. Maybe they get transferred to a different course if it looks like they won't make the grade in the LLB?
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    (Original post by jneill)
    I find it hard to believe *nobody* gets a 2:2 from Warwick. Maybe they get transferred to a different course if it looks like they won't make the grade in the LLB?
    That looks really odd, and my first assumption is that it's a mistake- but you could be right in that people get forced off the LLB if it looks like they won't make a 2:1.
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    (Original post by jneill)
    I find it hard to believe *nobody* gets a 2:2 from Warwick. Maybe they get transferred to a different course if it looks like they won't make the grade in the LLB?
    (Original post by SlowlorisIncognito)
    That looks really odd, and my first assumption is that it's a mistake- but you could be right in that people get forced off the LLB if it looks like they won't make a 2:1.
    "Data from 10 students"
    https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search

    Warwick have around 10 LLB courses https://unistats.direct.gov.uk/subje...eturnTo/Search seems to be where the bulk of the students sit (5% 1st, 79% 2i)
 
 
 
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