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    It's ok to be mad


    High Stakes STEM master race
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    :rofl: :rofl: I lol'd
    Gone but never forgotten


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    (Original post by zetamcfc)
    Speak for yourself.
    Your local library has up to date academic standard history books on subjects other than 20th century and Reformation era British history? Where do you live, Hampstead? Anyway the point still stands, a lot of people don't even have a local library any more let alone a half-decent one that could realistically equal a university library.
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    I don't really get the whole STEM superiority obsession, although it only seems to exist on TSR.

    Anyway, I really like humanities and social science students. Their tuition fees are subsidising my science degree and that taq polymerase doesn't come cheap.
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    (Original post by TeeEm)
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    Story of my life.
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    "/girls/non-binary gender individuals"

    Does this mean I wasn't supposed to read or reply to this because I'm not in those groups?
    Or are those the only people who do humanities in your eyes?

    I don't understand
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    (Original post by Benis)
    "/girls/non-binary gender individuals"

    Does this mean I wasn't supposed to read or reply to this because I'm not in those groups?
    Or are those the only people who do humanities in your eyes?

    I don't understand
    not to worry ... it is almost bedtime....
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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Story of my life.
    plus dribble?!
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    TSR Support Team
    Computer science didn't entirely get me on the career ladder, I was doing side projects since my late teenage years and thus gaining the experience I needed to ultimately land my first developer role after university.

    Having said that, I also definitely used the projects as part of the course to my advantage as well to further build up my portfolio.

    The course itself too provided me with various essential experiences that I utilise today and has inspired exploration into other fields - it is everywhere today and part of our lives - branching into all fields. And I notice how often many people don't realise this and take it for granted.
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    (Original post by Copperknickers)
    /girls/non-binary gender individuals

    It's time to settle this debate once and for all: why do STEM students deride arts and humanities students for studying non-STEM subjects?
    Granted this was posted at midnight, I will let this slide.

    Pro tip: STEM > all. #MASTERRACE

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    (Original post by XxKingSniprxX)
    Granted this was posted at midnight, I will let this slide.

    Pro tip: STEM > all. #MASTERRACE

    *smashes books to the ground and stands on table* STEM STEM STEM


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    (Original post by TeeEm)
    plus dribble?!
    :drool: is quite handy as a book marker. You'll never forget what page you were on
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    I misread and came here expecting you to accuse us all of being STEP fanboys. I was disappointed: M is often more interesting than STEM.

    Since I'm here, I may as well contribute. I think it's a minority of STEM students that deride arts and humanities students. Arts and humanities subjects are a lot more boring than STEM subjects, so we often question why someone would like to study them out of choice.
    It's strange how you mention history as being one of the degrees with lowest employability, then praise its employability.
    Why would you want to study something and then get a job in something unrelated?
    I find it funny how you reduce STEM to "doing equations".
    If I enjoy a subject I'd like to spend my time studying that subject, rather than socialising and joining lots of societies. Also, why would a humanity degree be more fulfilling than a STEM degree?
    The same point about libraries holds for STEM subjects(probably even more so). I think my local library had a small shelf dedicated to STEM subjects and a medium sized room dedicated to arts and humanities. Obviously the feedback etc. is invaluable too.
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    Firstly, thank you to the posters who are engaging with the argument instead of trying to start a needless flamewar.

    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I misread and came here expecting you to accuse us all of being STEP fanboys. I was disappointed: M is often more interesting than STEM.

    Since I'm here, I may as well contribute. I think it's a minority of STEM students that deride arts and humanities students. Arts and humanities subjects are a lot more boring than STEM subjects, so we often question why someone would like to study them out of choice.
    I find STEM subjects extremely interesting. But my dissertation was on the relative advantages of different tactics in medieval warfare. It was basically studying the real Game of Thrones, in other words. As interesting as physics and maths are, I think it's safe to say the average person finds history much more interesting, when both are presented in an entertaining format. After all things like art and literature are basically studying entertainment so its difficult to find them boring unless you don't like art and literature in the first place (in which case I'm afraid you're in a rather small minority).

    It's strange how you mention history as being one of the degrees with lowest employability, then praise its employability.
    I was using history as an example because it's similar to what I studied. My point was, low comparitive employability =/= low total employability, so actually its perfectly possible to get a job with a history degree as long as you don't make the mistakes that the 10% of unemployed history grads make.

    Why would you want to study something and then get a job in something unrelated?
    Because outside of the STEM world, most paid positions are not steps on a vocational career ladder. They are just short-medium term posts, which you can easily become good at just from training courses and learning on the job. It's a waste of time to study a degree in something like journalism when you don't need a journalism degree. Many jobs just require a generic degree in anything so its better to do something you enjoy and are good at rather than something 'practical' which in real terms is no more practical than a philosophy or language degree etc. And so unless you have a particular aptitude for maths or tech, there's no pressing need to study a specific subject (at least at undergrad level, you will need to do further study to be eligible for progress in certain careers as I said).

    If I enjoy a subject I'd like to spend my time studying that subject, rather than socialising and joining lots of societies.
    Can't you do both? Most people don't like studying for 12-14 hours per day, however much they like their subject, which is not uncommon among STEM students at places like Oxbridge. If STEM is your particular aptitude then fair enough, but pressuring everyone to do STEM instead of arts/humanities is just not intelligent and there are advantages to participating in societies that many STEM students miss out on.

    (Original post by Benis)
    "/girls/non-binary gender individuals"

    Does this mean I wasn't supposed to read or reply to this because I'm not in those groups?
    Or are those the only people who do humanities in your eyes?

    I don't understand
    You are not a boy/girl/non-binary gender individual, which afaik covers every extant member of the homo sapiens species? What are you, a Neptunian mole person?
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    (Original post by JohnGreek)
    While I've certainly heard the occasional jibe during exam time from both 'sides' - the classic "go research medieval Russian crop yields or something" versus "how about you play around with your calculator, son", I'd never realised that this STEM/non-STEM debate went this far...

    Then, of course, it could just be the internet blowing a trivial matter out of proportion again.
    Yep, hit the nail right on the head.

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    (Original post by Copperknickers)
    You are not a boy/girl/non-binary gender individual, which afaik covers every extant member of the homo sapiens species? What are you, a Neptunian mole person?
    Well, the thread starter didn't say "boy/girl/non-binary gender individual", she just said "girls/non-binary gender"

    That being said, I am a Neptunian mole person, so well done
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    (Original post by Copperknickers)

    Can't you do both? Most people don't like studying for 12-14 hours per day, however much they like their subject, which is not uncommon among STEM students at places like Oxbridge. If STEM is your particular aptitude then fair enough, but pressuring everyone to do STEM instead of arts/humanities is just not intelligent and there are advantages to participating in societies that many STEM students miss out on.
    Examples...
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    Luv it lads.
    **** stem.
    Mathematics all the way
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    Convinced so many people from the maths tread came over because we misread STEM as STEP


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