Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free

What razor to use? - Teenager Watch

    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by MagicNMedicine)
    I don't know that but Edwin Jaggers are good so sounds good.

    Make sure you get a good brush (I recommend the men-u synthetic brush, its been easily teh best I've had. Cheaper ones or boar hair ones just don't seem to lather that well for me) and also some good cream or soap. I like the Taylor of Old Bond Street or Geo F Trumper ones (the TOBS sensitive skin cream is great if you have a bowl to mix it up in, really nice lather and good for your skin). Also Tabac soap is great for getting a good lather although some people don't like the smell.
    Is it really necessary to get a brush and cream. I was planning on using my hands and my uncle's shaving foam who I live with. :lol:
    Like does it make a difference if you use a brush or not and whether you use cream or foam?
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I dont know if I am posting it in the right section but here it is...
    I am 16 and I have a reasonably dark moustache and a visible amount of hair on my cheeks, chin and neck. I want to start shaving but the problem is I have some spots on my cheeks, which is making the decision of 'which razor to buy- electric, double-edged or the normal manual one' harder. :
    So can anyone help me this problem - suggesting a razor(type) for a 16yo with spots.
    Thanks.
    First thing is to make sure you keep clean (obviously). While having acne will often mean you get spots whether you're clean or not, it always helps to make sure. When I was a teenager, I found brewer's yeast helped reduce the spots as well - you can get those from pretty much any health food shops.

    As for what razor to suggest, that's mostly down to personal preference. I started shaving at thirteen, which was a couple of years before I started having anything like acne, and while I initially used an electric shaver, I quickly found that disposable razors were better - more comfortable, and did a better job. Since then I've used electric shavers again sometimes, old-fashioned safety razors (the ones you screw a bendy blade into) and even a straight razor, but I always come back to the disposable razors, like the ones you can get for a coupld of quid from Home Bargains (never said I wasn't cheap).

    Don't be too scared of shaving when you've got spots. As much as you'll crap yourself about nicking one and getting blood everywhere, you'll find it barely ever happens. And cutting yourself doesn't really hurt. You just feel the cut, and then there's blood all over, which is more convenient than anything else.

    Probably an essay. But to the point, here's what I'd say: use disposable razors, and start once a week. Wash your face first in hot, rinse thoroughly, and then apply shaving cream. Shave carefully but confidently, and don't go over the same spot more than once, especially at first. Don't worry if you don't do a perfect job, you'll get better with time and practice. Don't stop if you cut yourself.

    When you're done, rinse your face with cold water, which closes your pores and makes you less prone to spots and helps any cuts stop bleeding quicker. Then dry thoroughly, and put some after-shave on - beside smelling good, it's made from alcohol which disinfects any cuts and again helps slow down any bleeding.

    Once your skin's toughened up, move from once a week to once every two or three days. Contrary to popular belief, shaving more often doesn't make it grow back thicker - you just don't want your skin to get sore.

    I appreciate that this may seem ironic to anyone who might know that I had a beard for a long time :lol:
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Is it really necessary to get a brush and cream. I was planning on using my hands and my uncle's shaving foam who I live with. :lol:
    Like does it make a difference if you use a brush or not and whether you use cream or foam?
    Yes if you don't have the right quality of cream/soap then it affects your shave and you're more likely to get cuts and stuff.

    When you see someone complain that a double edged razor didn't work for them its a pretty safe bet that they haven't used cream or soap.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Tootles)
    First thing is to make sure you keep clean (obviously). While having acne will often mean you get spots whether you're clean or not, it always helps to make sure. When I was a teenager, I found brewer's yeast helped reduce the spots as well - you can get those from pretty much any health food shops.

    As for what razor to suggest, that's mostly down to personal preference. I started shaving at thirteen, which was a couple of years before I started having anything like acne, and while I initially used an electric shaver, I quickly found that disposable razors were better - more comfortable, and did a better job. Since then I've used electric shavers again sometimes, old-fashioned safety razors (the ones you screw a bendy blade into) and even a straight razor, but I always come back to the disposable razors, like the ones you can get for a coupld of quid from Home Bargains (never said I wasn't cheap).

    Don't be too scared of shaving when you've got spots. As much as you'll crap yourself about nicking one and getting blood everywhere, you'll find it barely ever happens. And cutting yourself doesn't really hurt. You just feel the cut, and then there's blood all over, which is more convenient than anything else.

    Probably an essay. But to the point, here's what I'd say: use disposable razors, and start once a week. Wash your face first in hot, rinse thoroughly, and then apply shaving cream. Shave carefully but confidently, and don't go over the same spot more than once, especially at first. Don't worry if you don't do a perfect job, you'll get better with time and practice. Don't stop if you cut yourself.

    When you're done, rinse your face with cold water, which closes your pores and makes you less prone to spots and helps any cuts stop bleeding quicker. Then dry thoroughly, and put some after-shave on - beside smelling good, it's made from alcohol which disinfects any cuts and again helps slow down any bleeding.

    Once your skin's toughened up, move from once a week to once every two or three days. Contrary to popular belief, shaving more often doesn't make it grow back thicker - you just don't want your skin to get sore.

    I appreciate that this may seem ironic to anyone who might know that I had a beard for a long time :lol:
    So basically any type of razors works fine with thin hair (wet, electric, de or disposable)?
    And I might have missed it but does it make a difference whether you use cream or foam
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So basically any type of razors works fine with thin hair (wet, electric, de or disposable)?
    And I might have missed it but does it make a difference whether you use cream or foam
    I wouldn't go near an electric shaver, frankly. Especially if you've never shaved before.

    Also I'd avoid foam. It's cheap and crap. Personally I'd say shaving soap is best, but that's messing around you're probably not prepared to do - in which case, i'd go with gel.
    • #1
    • Thread Starter
    #1

    (Original post by Tootles)
    I wouldn't go near an electric shaver, frankly. Especially if you've never shaved before.

    Also I'd avoid foam. It's cheap and crap. Personally I'd say shaving soap is best, but that's messing around you're probably not prepared to do - in which case, i'd go with gel.
    Why do you say that?
    and what about cream? do you prefer gel to cream?
    Offline

    20
    (Original post by Anonymous)
    Why do you say that?
    and what about cream? do you prefer gel to cream?
    Because they don't work as well. Same as with gel - it's better for your skin.
 
 
 
Reply
Submit reply
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Updated: March 30, 2016
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    What's your favourite Christmas sweets?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Quick reply
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.