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How to cope with the gap between GCSE's and A-levels?? watch

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    (Original post by shilshark)
    regarding year groups. would this apply to sixth forms/colleges

    for example say someone got AAAA in a very good sixth form and someone got the same results in another underperforming one and both had same UMS. would they select the underperforming individual?
    (Original post by jamestg)
    There are other factors, however based on that the underperforming one would be more likely because they have the odds stacked against them.

    But this is where it's complex and mysterious - best bet is an admissions tutor or jneill
    The ATs say there is more to it than that in reality. Your application is reviewed holistically but yes the context is considered as part of that assessment.

    http://www.undergraduate.study.cam.a...ontextual-data
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    (Original post by FaisalNaeem03)
    Manz already worring bout A-levels.
    Haha yeah, maybe I should just focus on GCSE's! (But then again there are people who are so prepared they are like 100% sure on the uni they will apply to etc)
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    (Original post by Lkathryn08)
    Honestly, if you're a hard worker it shouldn't be too difficult to adapt to the higher difficulty. I never really found the jump to be too bad as the teachers know that there is a jump in difficulty and will accommodate for this too! Worry about your GCSEs first as doing well in these and making sure you have a good understanding of GCSE content will help with the transition to a-level
    Yeah, seems like the best thing to do is just to focus on GCSE's right now and work really hard at A-level!
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    (Original post by Mayhem™)
    Don't want to sound complacent here, but to me it seems to only be a big gap for those who didn't do really well in GCSE's (I mean grades like B/C and no A/A*'s just in case you were wondering).
    I spoke to someone regarding this and about maths in particular, they said I should have no problem doing really well at it If I perform like I do at GCSE.
    From what I've heard Maths is one of the subjects that have the biggest gaps?? (which is why I'm not 100% on taking it at A-level.)
    But I guess at the end it really is down to how hard you work.
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    (Original post by Ajjusrevision)
    Haha yeah, maybe I should just focus on GCSE's! (But then again there are people who are so prepared they are like 100% sure on the uni they will apply to etc)
    Just remember 'They'.
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    There are several books, videos and online resources that aim to bridge the gap, CGP have a good one for maths. It's mainly about getting your mind into gear for the intensity that's ahead. The gap between a levels and GCSE isn't so much content but structural and work load
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    (Original post by Ajjusrevision)
    Hi, so a lot of people have been telling me to prepare myself for a huge gap between GCSE standard and A-level standard. Do you have any tips for this?
    Btw the A-levels I'm hoping to do are Biology, Chemistry, Psychology and (maybe) Maths.

    Thanks!
    I do Biology Chemistry Geography (Maths up to AS)
    Honestly is isn't so bad and I only started to feel the vast difficulty around January time.
    A2 is when it really hits you though hahah.
    Chemistry is probably the worst one in terms of the jump up, me doing A2 chemistry now, I feel GCSE chemistry was the worst sort of deception, but I guess you get used to the constant work.

    No really way to prepare before hand though - all I'd say is start work from the start, literally September time, it'll cause a lot more stress if you start proper work early and keep up the motivation.
    I wouldnt worry about doing work in the summer - just enjoy it and recover from GCSE
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    (Original post by Synonym)
    you dont.... you dont cope .... there's just a shi*storm ahead
    hahah ok thanks anyway
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    Perhaps buy some of the textbooks early on and make notes on some of the earlier/more simple content?

    If your school sets you "bridging" activities over the summer to prepare you then do them, it will help you get a taste for what you'll be studying.

    Just don't underestimate how much work you'll have to be putting in throughout your A-Levels - it really is a big shock for the first few months.

    Keep on top of your notes and stay organised throughout the year and you should cope, and remember that it doesn't matter how well you've done in your GCSEs, you can still screw up massively.
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    (Original post by NotMolly)
    Perhaps buy some of the textbooks early on and make notes on some of the earlier/more simple content?

    If your school sets you "bridging" activities over the summer to prepare you then do them, it will help you get a taste for what you'll be studying.

    Just don't underestimate how much work you'll have to be putting in throughout your A-Levels - it really is a big shock for the first few months.

    Keep on top of your notes and stay organised throughout the year and you should cope, and remember that it doesn't matter how well you've done in your GCSEs, you can still screw up massively.
    My school doesn't have any bridging activities but it sounds like a good idea to read up a bit on the subjects I'm hoping to take and work consistently from the beginning. Thanks
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    For me at the start I didnt feel it as it was just building on gcse knowledge. So I got complacent and didnt do read over stuff regularly that I said I would do at the start.
    Maybe i had high expectations of the jump but for me it is more of a slow descent.
    (For maths though if you are strong at it then AS level maths will probably seem easier than GCSE )

    You get set wayyy more homework and if you have not so good teachers the work can seem like a mountain (self teaching way more). If you have good work habits then you wont really feel the jump.

    Getting an A* at GCSE is not the same as an A* in A level (or in my case high As for AS) IMO. And I can feel the 'jump' now.
    I felt it very strongly during February half term and its horrible. Although I am slowly getting more confident.

    If I could turn back time now and made life easier for myself I would have started self teaching ahead and make notes during summer after GCSEs rather than spending a lot of volunteering at a charity shop for fun. Although that is just me.
    That would be overkill though to some.

    I'd just tell you just to work hard from the start and not get complacent. If its easy stuff then read ahead and make notes!
    Make notes but good notes early so you can build upon it.

    A lot of my friends are struggling with the workload of the sciences right now so I guess its good to force yourself to work consistently to save yourself from having to revise for hours on end to cover biology.
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    Hi so I haven't read any of the other replies so I really hope I'm not repeating but...
    For me, there wasn't much of a jump because I was already hard-working for GCSEs (I'm doing A2s now). But the key thing was to be on top of everything throughout the whole year (some people only start understanding topics and making notes the month before GCSEs) - i.e. make notes every half term, talk to teachers when you realise there is a topic you don't get rather than leaving it until later etc. Also, revise for mocks and take them super-seriously. Trust me, if you do this, it'll be an easy jump!
 
 
 
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