Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Engineerrookie)
    How did you find it??
    I don't think I can remember what the exam questions consisted of anymore tbh + what I properly thought of it bc it was quite a while ago + I've had quite a few since then.

    Hm, how irritating. I think it was alright though? We had that double titration calculation stuff at the beginning I think..which was quite nice then a 2 marker crystallization question at the end. - I don't know what was in between. >.<

    What about you?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anon_98)
    I don't think I can remember what the exam questions consisted of anymore tbh + what I properly thought of it bc it was quite a while ago + I've had quite a few since then.

    Hm, how irritating. I think it was alright though? We had that double titration calculation stuff at the beginning I think..which was quite nice then a 2 marker crystallization question at the end. - I don't know what was in between. >.<

    What about you?

    I personally found it okay, but I'm sure people would've messed up that Vanadium redox potential question, as well as the question about calibrating a ph probe then how you would use the results (interpolate calibration curve) and the nickel complex question was pretty weird!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Engineerrookie)
    I personally found it okay, but I'm sure people would've messed up that Vanadium redox potential question, as well as the question about calibrating a ph probe then how you would use the results (interpolate calibration curve) and the nickel complex question was pretty weird!
    Yeah
    I found it pretty difficult tbh
    I'm hoping grade boundaries would be low but I don't think that's likely



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Yeah
    I found it pretty difficult tbh
    I'm hoping grade boundaries would be low but I don't think that's likely



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    What are you hoping for in Chem? I guess it's only a small percentage of the a level so don't worry!
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Engineerrookie)
    What are you hoping for in Chem? I guess it's only a small percentage of the a level so don't worry!
    Hoping for an A!
    But aiming for an A* as it might be what I do at uni.
    I got a B in AS so I retook the unit 1 module only.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    A few tips from me (since I've already had the pleasure of doing these exams ).. never try to memorise something if you don't get it (might sound a little obvious to some); ask your teachers, use the internet, textbooks, or any other means, and make sure the understanding is absolutely clear.. once you've done that, move on to past papers: do as many papers you can get hold of, and highlight any challenging questions so you can visit them again near the exam period. Making revision notes isn't necessary in my opinion, at least not for me because I just felt making them would have been a waste of time.. but if they work for you, then go for it!

    The only aim of this post is to encourage everyone taking these exams.. there's no doubt these exams are tough, but with practice it's not going to be as bad as some people might make it out to be.
    Spoiler:
    Show
    For anyone interested, I averaged 97% in A2 Chem
    Offline

    13
    Anyone got anything on organic synthesis? I can't deal with it man, I have no clue when it comes to answering a synthesis question lol
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Anon_98)
    Yeah, it's such a big topic aha. Aw I mean, it feels a little tedious at first but I find it really fun learning all the colours + reactions so I think that makes it easier + my notes for it are super pretty too which helps. Make some pretty notes! I also think it's more manageable if you split it up into sub-sections. So I've got it like:

    - properties+ characteristics
    - Complex formation
    - Unidentate/Bidentate/Multidentate
    -Naming cationic complexes
    - Naming anionic complexes
    - Stereochemistry
    - Ligand substitution reactions
    - Reactions of metal-aqua ions in solution.
    - Transition metals as catalysts.
    - Colour of ions + Spectrophotometry.

    It's the only topic I've made notes on so far lol. I'd recommend that you make your notes on each section + then learn each individual sub-section. I think the easiest way to learn the reactions is by grouping them in pairs. I don't know what works for you, but since there are 6 elements to remember ( Copper, Cobalt, Iron(II), Iron (III), Chromium, Aluminium) I grouped Copper + Cobalt. Then I grouped the two Irons and I grouped Chromium + Aluminium which is all based on the reactions that take place.

    I'm not sure that all makes much sense.

    Oh, I literally haven't done any Biology revision whatsoever. I have zero knowledge on it. Like, absolutely zero.- I genuinely don't even know what I've learnt this year bar light independent reactions + the worst thing is, it's my weakest subject so I should really be spending much more time on it. I guess I prefer Unit 4 though bc I don't know anything in Unit 5. What about you?

    Thank you for the luck! I also did AS physics last year, I totally agree with that judgement. Thankfully I picked Statistics as my module though, which isn't quite as bad. (':
    Thanks so much for your tips on transition metals! I'll be sure to write up some pretty notes on those and hopefully it'll help a bit. Especially grouping the metals together, that sounds like it would work really well.

    I think biology is really not about content. Obviously, you need the foundation of content to build upon but I'm sure you're aware that it's all about application of knowledge, especially at A2. If you can do that and data/math questions, I'm sure you'll be okay.

    I much prefer unit 5 to unit 4 - it's so much more interesting! Unit 4 doesn't even feel like biology to me :/

    I've heard statistics is a lot easier than mechanics, hope it goes well for you!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Bloom77)
    Hoping for an A!
    But aiming for an A* as it might be what I do at uni.
    I got a B in AS so I retook the unit 1 module only.



    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Same here, although I'm retaking unit 1 and unit 2, it says on the specification that unit 2 is 23% of our a level and each A2 module is just 20%?! I'm pretty sure I won't be getting an A* but I know it's only about around 85/100 to get an A* in unit 5 so it doesn't seem to bad
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    6. (a) (i) Draw a fully-labelled Born–Haber cycle forthe formation of solid barium chloride, BaCl2, from its elements.Include state symbols for all species involved.
    (ii) Use your Born–Haber cycle and the standardenthalpy data given below to calculate a value for the electron affinity ofchlorine. Enthalpy of atomisation of barium +180 kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of atomisation of chlorine +122kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of formation of barium chloride –859kJ mol–1
    First ionisation enthalpy of barium +503kJ mol–1
    Second ionisation enthalpy of barium +965kJ mol–1
    Lattice formation enthalpy of barium chloride –2056kJ mol–1 Ive had a go at this Q and know the answer to it - it came up as -347kj/mol which was half the value initially got of -695 - so i missed the step to half that value but i dont understand why i need to half it? (ii) Use your Born–Haber cycle and the standardenthalpy data given below to calculate a value for the electron affinity ofchlorine. Enthalpy of atomisation of barium +180 kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of atomisation of chlorine +122kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of formation of barium chloride –859kJ mol–1
    First ionisation enthalpy of barium +503kJ mol–1
    Second ionisation enthalpy of barium +965kJ mol–1
    Lattice formation enthalpy of barium chloride –2056kJ mol–1
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    sorry the message messed up
    Ive had a go at this Q and know the answer to it - it came up as -347kj/mol which was half the value initially got of -695 - so i missed the step to half that value but i dont understand why i need to half it? (ii) Use your Born–Haber cycle and the standardenthalpy data given below to calculate a value for the electron affinity ofchlorine.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Does anyone have any useful resources for learning all of the colours/ transition metal equations? Thanks!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ReviewTag)
    Does anyone have any useful resources for learning all of the colours/ transition metal equations? Thanks!
    Check out www.scienceskool.co.uk

    Specifically: http://www.scienceskool.co.uk/unit-5.html and then colour of complexes. Might help you visualise it a little easier.

    Good luck!
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajsullivan)
    Check out www.scienceskool.co.uk

    Specifically: http://www.scienceskool.co.uk/unit-5.html and then colour of complexes. Might help you visualise it a little easier.

    Good luck!
    Can I just say thanks so much for this! It was a massive help for simplifying the transition metal reactions and colours
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    Could someone possible help answer my Q on this thread?


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ahsan_ijaz)
    6. (a) (i) Draw a fully-labelled Born–Haber cycle forthe formation of solid barium chloride, BaCl2, from its elements.Include state symbols for all species involved.
    (ii) Use your Born–Haber cycle and the standardenthalpy data given below to calculate a value for the electron affinity ofchlorine. Enthalpy of atomisation of barium +180 kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of atomisation of chlorine +122kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of formation of barium chloride –859kJ mol–1
    First ionisation enthalpy of barium +503kJ mol–1
    Second ionisation enthalpy of barium +965kJ mol–1
    Lattice formation enthalpy of barium chloride –2056kJ mol–1 Ive had a go at this Q and know the answer to it - it came up as -347kj/mol which was half the value initially got of -695 - so i missed the step to half that value but i dont understand why i need to half it? (ii) Use your Born–Haber cycle and the standardenthalpy data given below to calculate a value for the electron affinity ofchlorine. Enthalpy of atomisation of barium +180 kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of atomisation of chlorine +122kJ mol–1
    Enthalpy of formation of barium chloride –859kJ mol–1
    First ionisation enthalpy of barium +503kJ mol–1
    Second ionisation enthalpy of barium +965kJ mol–1
    Lattice formation enthalpy of barium chloride –2056kJ mol–1

    Because the value you got (-695 kj mol-1) is the electron affinity of chlorine x 2. You had 2Cl(g). Electron affinity is energy change when ONE mole of gaseous atoms gains one mole of electrons.

    Therefore you need to divide -695 by 2
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Signorina)
    Because the value you got (-695 kj mol-1) is the electron affinity of chlorine x 2. You had 2Cl(g). Electron affinity is energy change when ONE mole of gaseous atoms gains one mole of electrons.

    Therefore you need to divide -695 by 2
    Thanks thats fine but the molecule is bacl2? so considering it has 2 chlorine which would have to be 2cl- thus wouldnt you have 2 electron affinities?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ahsan_ijaz)
    Thanks thats fine but the molecule is bacl2? so considering it has 2 chlorine which would have to be 2cl- thus wouldnt you have 2 electron affinities?

    Yes ur correct in sense for the born haber cycle you would use -695 because you need two electron affinities

    However The question is "what's the electron affinity of chlorine?

    Think of it as:
    2 x electron affinity of Cl = -695

    You just want the electron affinity of Cl so

    Electron affinity of Cl = -695/2

    It's hard to explain and I understand why you're struggling to understand it but just remember the definition of electron affinity... The energy change when one mole of gaseous atoms gains one mole of electrons. What you found out is the energy change when TWO moles of gaseous atoms ......etc

    Hence why you need to divide by two.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by ajsullivan)
    Check out www.scienceskool.co.uk

    Specifically: http://www.scienceskool.co.uk/unit-5.html and then colour of complexes. Might help you visualise it a little easier.

    Good luck!
    Cool Thank you!
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Chem 5 is my weakness. Any good resources for understanding the cycles in questions. I don't even get close to any of their values and only pick up marks for the definitions. Help?
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up salt or pepper?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.