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    (Original post by duncanjgraham)
    there's misunderstanding in this thread
    fix it then
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    (Original post by PotAuFeu)
    Are you sure that the continuity correction for P(X<5) is P(X<5+0.5)?
    The way I remember it is that you want it <5 so take away 0.5 so you don't include 5 and if you want >5 then add 0.5 so you don't include 5. Likewise, if you want <=5 then add 0.5 to include 5 and if you want >=5 then you take away 0.5 to include 5.
    Hope that makes sense, I haven't seen particularly many 1/2n corrections but when I have, I just do my continuity corrections as I said so above and the answer comes out fine.

    For when to use 1/2n, I found http://www.mathshelper.co.uk/OCR%20S...on%20Sheet.pdf to be helpful. Basically, do it when you are approximating a discrete distribution using the CLT.
    Hi hi, my bad, I'd never be continuity correcting P(X<5) or P(X>5) because I'd make the probability asked for into the form <= or => before considering the approximate normal distribution . It then follows what you say. I meant it in a more general case (I should have been more mathematically accurate and so am going to delete the comment from the thread in case it confuses people)

    I'm a fan of 1/2n continuity corrections
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    (Original post by duncanjgraham)
    Hi hi, my bad, I'd never be continuity correcting P(X<5) or P(X>5) because I'd make the probability asked for into the form <= or => before considering the approximate normal distribution . It then follows what you say. I meant it in a more general case (I should have been more mathematically accurate and so am going to delete the comment from the thread in case it confuses people)

    I'm a fan of 1/2n continuity corrections
    Yeah I like doing that also, though it works out the same regardless of what you choose to do.
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    Okay, thank you!
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    When is S^2 used? Like in June 2012, why is S^2 used in question 5 but not question 2?
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    (Original post by MrZebraCookie)
    When is S^2 used? Like in June 2012, why is S^2 used in question 5 but not question 2?
    In question 2 you are trying to find the population variance, in question 5 you are using the sample variance to estimate the population variance
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    (Original post by hallo.C)
    In question 2 you are trying to find the population variance, in question 5 you are using the sample variance to estimate the population variance
    Thank you. In general, am I only gonna need S^2 when the question involves working out the mean and variance from sigma x and sgma x^2
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    (Original post by MrZebraCookie)
    Thank you. In general, am I only gonna need S^2 when the question involves working out the mean and variance from sigma x and sgma x^2
    I'm pretty sure that's the only way you can use it, I've never seen it in any other context on any of the papers
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    For June 2012 Q8 why do you divide the variance by n? There's no mention of sample means or mean of observations, nor can you use the CLT as n is too small.
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    For June 2012 Q8 why do you divide the variance by n? There's no mention of sample means or mean of observations, nor can you use the CLT as n is too small.
    You always divide the variance by n when it gives you a sample size.
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    (Original post by Parallex)
    You always divide the variance by n when it gives you a sample size.
    What about Jan 2013 2ii? I got that right but that's a sample.
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    (Original post by 16characterlimit)
    What about Jan 2013 2ii? I got that right but that's a sample.
    Sorry my bad. In Jan 2013, you're calculating P(C>40) rather than P(C bar>40), i.e. not the distribution of the means.
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    (Original post by Parallex)
    Sorry my bad. In Jan 2013, you're calculating P(C>40) rather than P(C bar>40), i.e. not the distribution of the means.
    np I think I get it now
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    Hi !! It is bit urgent !!
    My calculator has functions to calculate the probability distributions; I was wondering if I could use my calculator instead of the tables that are provided; What do you guys think? If it would be okay
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    (Original post by curious_M)
    Hi !! It is bit urgent !!
    My calculator has functions to calculate the probability distributions; I was wondering if I could use my calculator instead of the tables that are provided; What do you guys think? If it would be okay
    If you are going to do that, I would then check on the tables that you get the same value. Use your calculator as the checking tool rather than solely relying on it
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    (Original post by hallo.C)
    If you are going to do that, I would then check on the tables that you get the same value. Use your calculator as the checking tool rather than solely relying on it
    Thanks very much
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    (Original post by curious_M)
    Hi !! It is bit urgent !!
    My calculator has functions to calculate the probability distributions; I was wondering if I could use my calculator instead of the tables that are provided; What do you guys think? If it would be okay
    Personally I always use the calculator for normal distributions.
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    I can share my answers if anyone wants? pretty decent paper tbh
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    So how did everyone find it?
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    (Original post by andygeor)
    I can share my answers if anyone wants? pretty decent paper tbh
    Would be great if you could!! I can also post my answers
 
 
 
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