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Should mental health education be taught in schools? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Should mental health education be taught in schools?
    Yes
    847
    87.14%
    No
    125
    12.86%

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    I am curious to know why people voted no
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    It's a good idea and I am in favour of it but I don't know how well it can be conveyed as these days, children misbehave and disrespect teachers and often won't take things seriously. It's a good idea but it depends on what medium it is taught - it needs to engage pupils and get them thinking.
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    Realistically, teaching MH in school is always going to be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, it can identify and encourage people to talk about different mental conditions and give them a place to seek help if they need it. However, I fear that, in a conventional classroom setting, it's too easy to get distracted or bogged down in doing menial tasks without any real interaction with the subject. Add to that the fact that most students won't take a subject that doesn't get graded/have exams seriously, and that teachers aren't equipped or can't be arsed to properly talk about it, and you have a recipe for a waste-of-time lesson which is effectively treated by all participants as a "free" period.

    If you wanted to teach it properly, I'd have suggested getting an external speaker and organising a lecture for different year groups with the content reflecting their maturity/the likelihood of different conditions emerging at different ages. That way, you can create an atmosphere of relative formality during which the students can only direct their attention towards the speaker, instead of ****ing about on their phones or chatting. It also gives potential for a more controlled form of student interaction, where, for instance, you can do votes or ask people to talk to their neighbours for a few moments about something that has been discussed. We have a transgender-related talk in this manner, and I have to say that it forced people into actually listening and interacting with the issue instead of laughing it off with comments like "**** the trannies" etc, as they may have done in a more intimate classroom setting.
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    It definitely does - I've signed a petition to try and get it brought into schools. However, the current government are so focused on grades so who knows...

    It is so important - more and more young people either experience who know someone who experiences from mental health issues at some point in their life, whether that is something more uncommon like schizophrenia or something like anorexia or depression. However, it needs to be covered sensitively and staff need to be equipped with knowledge of mental health and avenues for support
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    not only teach about the signs of mental health and the types etc but also how to comfort a friend going through something and how to make sure they are okay. also tips on how to take care of yourself, not big things like find a good therapist, small things like sitting outside for a few minutes listening to birdsong or read a book to immerse yourself within the world of the character. that sort of thing which if done often enough can make a whole lot of difference
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    Oh heck yes!! All we had were vague discussions of 'stress relief' which isn't the same thing as educating about serious, long term conditions. I don't even remember talking of the more common ones, depression or anxiety disorders, let alone schizophrenia or bi-polar disorder! I don't think it would necessarily help students with mental health conditions - me being taught about GAD wouldn't have prevented it - but it would encourage students to get help, and that teachers actually can understand what they're going through, which, personally, I'd find way more helpful.
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    Sure, replace R.E. with something useful.
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    Yep, definitely. Even if it's just something that they include within PSHE, would be much better than what I did for PSHE when at school. If I recall rightly, every year we pretty much went over similar/the same stuff - like drugs, alcohol etc.
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    One of the biggest issues with mental illness is that people do not take it as seriously as physical health. Mental health is now a bit of a taboo to discuss, and people think that mental illness is something that can be sorted out in a couple of days by "man up" or "grow thicker skins" or whatever. Some people consider mental illness to be a sign of weakness, or only something only "crazy" people have.

    People need to realise how common mental illness is. And how serious it can be - how much of an impact it can have on the life of the person and of the people around him/her. One of my parents had a severe depression, and seeing the reactions of my relatives to it, I painfully know how awfully the awareness for mental illness is lacking. I'm currently suffering from a mental health issue myself, and I regret not seeking for help as soon as I knew something was slightly wrong with me. I've kept it to myself for a while because I knew that none of my friends would take me seriously, and I could imagine them saying "Aww, you'll be fine, I hope you feel better soon " or something along the line.

    We really need to raise awareness for it, and starting from school is a good idea. If we educate our generation now, future adults will all know how to handle mental illness, and our kids will too.
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    Can we autoban anyone who voted no if they don't have a good argument?
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    Yes, as long as it's from competent teachers who know what they're talking about and the subject doesn't merely deteriorate into a memory exercise for examination purposes.
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    I suspect it would be taught by entirely unqualified maths teachers drafted in to dictate from a text book.
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    (Original post by Reue)
    I suspect it would be taught by entirely unqualified maths teachers drafted in to dictate from a text book.
    I'm sure they will be more than qualified, being a teacher would be depressing.
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    People who have mental health issues already receive help from a SEN specialist a the school they go to, I think.
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    It should absolutely be taught.
    If it was I wouldn't be like I am now!
    Goddamn stress is a *****!
    People need to be aware about how badly mental health can impact people's lives. It's a common problem and it needs greater awareness!
    I'm hoping in the future that someone will find a way to completely remove mental illnesses from people's lives.
    It truly sucks!
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    (Original post by FireFreezer77)
    I'm hoping in the future that someone will find a way to completely remove mental illnesses from people's lives.
    It truly sucks!
    :yep:
    And hopefully without all the **** side effects of current medications.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    :yep:
    And hopefully without all the **** side effects of current medications.
    Indeed. That would be great!
    I've got no energy currently because of my medication. I'm completely drained.
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    I would have to say yes, for several reasons:

    The stigma; I'm sure most would agree that the stigma attached to mental health issues is a negative one. This can be relieved if the younger generation are more informed, which requires intervention.

    The prevalence; given the statistics of how common mental health issues are, I see it fit to inform the next generation of how to identify any issues and how to go about resolving them. I speak from experience here! I believe I was depressed for several months but didn't realise until I had watched a YouTube video re: depression, in which I resonated with the uploader. I subsequently researched the symptoms of depression and realised I was depressed and should seek professional help, as with any other illness. One shouldn't have to stumble across YouTube videos in order to realise they are ill, and I suppose receiving an education re: mental health could rectify this. Indeed, if i hadn't stumbled across said YouTube video I believe I could have been suffering from depression for years without knowing I have a legit medical issue which requires attention.

    Having said that, I do agree with some of the other posters about the effectiveness of PSHE lessons, and think inviting an speaker would be a better idea, just to inform people. Had I been informed, I might have thought, "Hang on, perhaps I am depressed, perhaps this is why I am feeling this way!". Regardless of whether or not I was depressed at the time of attending the talk/lecture.
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    (Original post by Sabertooth)
    :yep:
    And hopefully without all the **** side effects of current medications.
    Instead it will be brain surgery.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    Instead it will be brain surgery.
    Not sure I'm keen on that idea. :/
 
 
 
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