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Why are lower grades so much more common at A Level watch

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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Fail analogy.
    fail argument
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Especially when M + FM = pretty much 1 subject.

    Yep, which is why I said 3 for me. :yep: To this day I still find GCSE Economics harder than something like M3 or FP3. :afraid:

    Besides, maths is probably the easiest to revise for seeing as it's rote learning by practising past papers most of the time.

    (Original post by Student403)
    I guess for people who have niche strengths A Levels are a lot easier
    What GCSEs did you do and with which board? Biology was hell for me, especially because my teacher was so mean. :cry:
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    (Original post by aymanzayedmannan)
    Yep, which is why I said 3 for me. :yep: To this day I still find GCSE Economics harder than something like M3 or FP3. :afraid:

    Besides, maths is probably the easiest to revise for seeing as it's rote learning by practising past papers most of the time.



    What GCSEs did you do and with which board? Biology was hell for me, especially because my teacher was so mean. :cry:
    I did M, Eng Lit/Lang, Bio, Chem, Phy, Business, German and ICT (and FSMQ). Bio with Edexcel which was annoying af
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    (Original post by Kevin:))
    I'm in Year 11 and I'm looking through the AS grades in my school for current Year 13s and I'm fairly startled by the amount of D and U grades, these being achieved by people who would be quite comfortable B/A/A* grade students at GCSE.

    Why does it seem to be so much easier to get low grades at A Level?
    isn;t it obvious that work is more difficult and people don't realise the amount of work needed to be done to get the same grades as the did at GCSE?
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    Also lets not forget grade boundaries. At GCSE science, 27/60 is an A, and 40/60 an A*. Anyone used to getting around the 27 mark is a D in AS. I keep getting 21/60, which would be a B at gcse but now a U- I'm panicking
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    (Original post by Student403)
    Invalid comparison.

    A-Levels aren't that much more advanced than GCSEs. And also noone is saying A Level Physics isn't harder than GCSE Physics. We're saying we found A Level revision as a whole (doesn't usually include subjects you're not very good at) a lot easier than GCSE revision (much more likely to contain subjects you're weak at) as a whole.
    So did I, what's your point? Obviously people who excel at given subjects will not struggle when they can focus on just them at a level. Doesn't change the fact that for the average intellect the complexity of a levels compared to gcse's will make it more difficult for them and this will be reflected in grades.

    The fact you think that "X person found A levels easier than gcses" is a proof or even good evidence that "a levels are not harder than gcses" is shocking.

    I mean given people obviously find a levels harder, what other answer to the thread be accepted in place of that a levels are harder for most people?
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    (Original post by banterboy)
    So did I, what's your point? Obviously people who excel at given subjects will not struggle when they can focus on just them at a level. Doesn't change the fact that for the average intellect the complexity of a levels compared to gcse's will make it more difficult for them and this will be reflected in grades.

    The fact you think that "X person found A levels easier than gcses" is a proof or even good evidence that "a levels are not harder than gcses" is shocking.

    I mean given people obviously find a levels harder, what other answer to the thread be accepted in place of that a levels are harder for most people?
    What? I never said this/meant this. You're completely missing my point.

    My point was solely about your comparison which I did not see as fitting to this question
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    Because some people's revision techniques involves at gcse to memorise content and this can work at subjects in gcse (some subjects). But what's more important is understanding concepts so you can apply your skills. A level is so applied that memorising alone won't do. It's a lot of work to revise and understand the sheer content. With the reforms, it's going to be even harder!
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    The exams are much harder. Essays are longer and have stricter marking points. GCSE exams have multiple choice options and a lot of short pretty easy answer questions. A-levels have much more specific mark schemes even short answers. You have to learn a lot more content to a higher degree than at GCSE where being in the right direction usually gets you the mark.
    It might be easier to revise at a-level with less subjects to worry about however the content level and difficulty is higher.
    The difficulty depends on the person in question.
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    Because people tend to try to apply GCSE revision techniques (aka leave it until last minute and then try to learn as much off by heart as possible) to A-level. Also possibly because grade boundaries are higher when taking the amount of effort required to achieve a grade into account.
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    They are called Advanced levels for a reason.

    Exams are not meant to be easy.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    I thought A-Level was about as tough as GCSE. *shrugs* Dunno what the above are saying.
    Good lord. What subjects did you take for your a levels to be as easy as GCSE's? Construction and ICT?
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    GCSE's content is far less than A-levels and application is far more straight forward than it is for A-levels, it takes awhile to get a hang of the correct formula to hit all the marks in A-level exams in my opinion.
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    (Original post by Lawliettt)
    Good lord. What subjects did you take for your a levels to be as easy as GCSE's? Construction and ICT?
    Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Economics, English Lit/Lang, French (first language) Lit/Lang, Business, IT.
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    It's because of how the subjects are. At GCSE it's all rote learning but at A level they expect you to actually understand what you're being taught. I found that even in IGCSE everything was asked in the same way you'd learnt it so an understanding wasn't required. At a level they'll teach you a concept with some common examples and then expect you to apply it in unfamiliar situations, in the sciences at least, I'm not sure about the floppy subjects.

    For example, in chemistry they teach you about the properties of hydroxyl (alcohol) functional group (-OH) and that the protium atom in these can be replaced with a deuterium atom by using what's called a 'D2O shake.' They also teach you about protium NMR spectroscopy. I've seen a past exam question where instead of a hydroxyl group the molecule has a thiol group (-SH). They then said that thiol groups behave similarly to hydroxyl groups (a bit generous really, you can work that out from a number of things if you didn't already know). The molecule had two amine groups as well, one tertiary the other secondary and a carboxylic acid group. The question then asked which 3 protium NMR peaks would be missing after a D2O shake.

    The answer is the thiol one, the carboxylic acid one and the secondary amine one. You'd be surprised how many people either said that the tertiary amine peak disappeared (even though it wouldn't have one in the first place) or that the thiol group would be untouched. The reason they goofed it was simply because they lacked an understanding of how the hydroxyl group behaves. They'd simply learnt, "if it's an alcohol do this." That kind of memorising just doesn't cut it at A level.
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    (Original post by Kevin:))
    I'm in Year 11 and I'm looking through the AS grades in my school for current Year 13s and I'm fairly startled by the amount of D and U grades, these being achieved by people who would be quite comfortable B/A/A* grade students at GCSE.

    Why does it seem to be so much easier to get low grades at A Level?
    Is this not just a 'NO SHlT Sherlock' kind of statement lol :/
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Maths, Further Maths, Physics, Economics, English Lit/Lang, French (first language) Lit/Lang, Business, IT.
    Crikey! You don't think that's overdoing it a bit?! :mute:
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    Crikey! You don't think that's overdoing it a bit?! :mute:
    Those were my GCSE's not my A-Levels.
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    (Original post by Peroxidation)
    ...
    The thing is (with maths) at least, you can do pretty much the same thing at A-Level. You can factorise a quadratic at A-Level but not know what it means for the real number field to be algebraically closed under the algebraic extension or closure called the complex number field.

    An A-Level student could sum evaluate an integral without for one second thinking about the result or how integration links in with riemann sums etc...

    example: Give this: \int_{-1}^{1} \frac{\mathrm{d}x}{x^2} to any A-Level student and see what they give you.
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    (Original post by dmy15)
    Is this not just a 'NO SHlT Sherlock' kind of statement lol :/
    Well.. no.. As you can see from many of the previous responses, it's not immediately obvious to me as a Year 11 the exact difficulties that arise at A Level?
 
 
 
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