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Article: Five revision myths demolished Watch

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    (Original post by OrionMusicNet)
    I don't think you really have to have a timetable to do work. In fact, some people spend so long making these fancy timetables that they fool themselves into thinking they have done work, even if they don't actually follow it when the time comes.
    I am 56 and I have done a lot of exams.

    And I say timetables are a very good idea.

    It is not to be seen in a negative way but like a reward option.

    For example you work one subject for 2 hours, then you allow yourself 30 mins break where you really switch off and relax your brain.

    Same for lunch time, give yourself 2 hours and really do something fun.

    Your batteries will be recharged and you will feel much fresher to get back to work. Overdoing it can also be bad for you, you need to find a nice balance, and also give time for sleep and good food. Good luck everyone x
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    (Original post by nanou22)
    I am 56 and I have done a lot of exams.

    And I say timetables are a very good idea.

    It is not to be seen in a negative way but like a reward option.

    For example you work one subject for 2 hours, then you allow yourself 30 mins break where you really switch off and relax your brain.

    Same for lunch time, give yourself 2 hours and really do something fun.

    Your batteries will be recharged and you will feel much fresher to get back to work. Overdoing it can also be bad for you, you need to find a nice balance, and also give time for sleep and good food. Good luck everyone x
    I wasn't saying that timetables aren't useful, they definitely can be, I was just pointing out the fact that some people misuse them and that they aren't necessarily needed (I wouldn't consider it 'dangerous' to not have one, it really depends on the person).
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    School is not a place for smart people.
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    I feel even more scared after reading that...:getmecoat:
    *bins highlighters and cries in a corner trying to make a revision timetable*
    That wasn't the idea at all - sorry!

    I think the article says that highlighting can be very useful ... but don't rely on it as your only method of revision.

    As for timetables - just a quick one to make sure your revision is balanced between subjects as you want it to be shouldn't take very long at all. You don't have to take the multi-coloured-every-moment-of-the-day-accounted-for approach.

    Happy revising!
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    (Original post by The Learn Ranger)
    I didn't realise you were an emotional wreck - sorry!

    I think the article says that highlighting can be very useful ... but don't rely on it as your only method of revision.

    As for timetables - just a quick one to make sure your revision is balanced between subjects as you want it to be shouldn't take very long at all. You don't have to take the multi-coloured-every-moment-of-the-day-accounted-for approach.

    Sad revising!
    Edited for ya
    No but in all seriousness the article was interesting, thank you!
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    Edited for ya
    No but in all seriousness the article was interesting, thank you!
    Ha - you're right, it isn't usually fun until the results arrive and (hopefully) you find your hard work paid off
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    I agree with a lot of the points in this article but I don't think you need a timetable. Timetables really just don't work for me, but there are other methods to ensure you get work done. I find that making to do lists really push me to do work but I don't feel trapped and like I have to schedule my whole day around work, which puts me off.
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    Timetables don't work for everyone. I am working on my third postgraduate qualification and have never done a timetable.

    Everyone is different. Personally my strategy is not to judge myself by how many hours of revision I put in but by the quality of it. I will prioritise what I feel I need to work on, use past papers and make sure that my notes are helpful. Ideally I aim to get what I need to know on as few pages as possible so that I can memorise (as long as I understand what this shorthand means (for example: Marx>Capitalism>Functionalism).

    Everyone is different with revision. There is no right or wrong as long as it works for you and you do do it. Also be honest about whether you have a short or long term memory and work with it. For goodness sake don't cram at the last minute but equally no matter how early on you start your revision, be sure to go over it with clarity and confidence the day before the exam if you can.

    Good luck everyone
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    'I know this one girl who did no revision at all… she got an A*'

    Not being arrogant, but I am this person. I did zero revision for all of my GCSES except two (music and geography) and ended up getting 7 A*'s and 6 A's.

    I did do revision for my A-levels and I am definitely doing revision for my degree- I'm also not against revising for exams
    BUT
    these people do exist and it's just plain wrong to say they don't.
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    I always make a timetable but it seriously doesn't work for me:dontknow::dontknow:
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    I've always found timetables more counterproductive than useful because I can't always revise a topic for only 1 hour or so, especially chemistry requires 2 or more hours per session. Also, I then have to factor in breaks, dinner time, shower into the timetable and if my food takes too long to cook, I've basically messed up my revision slots! Whenever I try to stick to a timetable there's always some family crisis or event so I just end up throwing it away
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    (Original post by homeland.lsw)
    I feel even more scared after reading that...:getmecoat:
    *bins highlighters and cries in a corner trying to make a revision timetable*
    haha omg. exactly the same here..
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    (Original post by The Learn Ranger)
    You're right - it can get a bit over the top but you have to be very confident and very well organised, with a clear view of what needs to be done to get by successfully without at least an outline plan I think.
    I've never really planned revision because I find it works better when I'm in the mood to revise
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    (Original post by Andy98)
    I've never really planned revision because I find it works better when I'm in the mood to revise
    That's great if it works for you. I guess I was a bit less motivated so was rarely in the mood to revise. I had to force myself and a plan helped me get motivated.
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    (Original post by The Learn Ranger)
    That's great if it works for you. I guess I was a bit less motivated so was rarely in the mood to revise. I had to force myself and a plan helped me get motivated.
    I never said it was a frequent occurrence :rofl:
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    Thinking that if you revise to soon , you'll forget it by the time the exam comes. You can NEVER revise too soon ... just keep it going right up until the time of the exam. Think of it like running a marathon, you have to pout in the training and not peak too soon !
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    Well, *some* people can pass the tests without studying. They're not myths. You just can't assume you will be one of them.
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    (Original post by elen90)
    Timetable's often don't work for me because I set myself unrealistic targets (yeah, sure, I'm going to do three hours' revision the moment I get home from school). That can often leaving you feel demotivated when you don't stick within the timetable, not only because it's easy to underestimate how long it will take you to do something.

    I expected a spider diagram to take me one hour yesterday. It took three.

    I find that simple to-do lists work better. Ones that don't have time constraints - just stuff you know needs to get done, whether you complete it all within three hours or ten. Other people may feel differently, but it isn't even the end of the world if something doesn't get checked off. Just move it to the next day. This is why it's best to do the longwinded objectives first. Isn't a huge drag on your next day's revision just to complete that sheet of questions the teacher set.

    People often forget that it isn't the amount of time you spend revising that matters, but what you actually learn. And timetables are a great way for notorious procrastinators like me to waste time.
    This is so so true! And with lists, it often looks like I have a lot less to do than I think (which makes things less stressful) as opposed to fancy timetables with angry, glaring blocks of a million different things I need to revise.
    I feel a sense of accomplishment with lists as I cross through each thing. The linear(?) layout is just so much neater and actually makes me feel organised. Plus, it only takes a minute to do unlike timetables which require a heck of a lot more commitment and effort! Just wasting valuable revision time!
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    how long should i revise each day for my gcse exams?
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    (Original post by PARTHENON01)
    how long should i revise each day for my gcse exams?
    About 3 hours is a good amount, more if your aiming high, some people i know who are going to do really well are doing 6 hours or more so it really depends on your aspirations.
 
 
 
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