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Metric or Imperial - which do you use? Watch

  • View Poll Results: Do use metric or imperial measurements?
    Metric
    20
    95.24%
    Imperial
    7
    33.33%

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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    How do you measure distance? Do you convert road signs into km?
    Good question. My sat nav thing on my phone is set to km, when I talk to people about distances I'll most often say how many metres or kilometres away something is, if I'm exercising indoors or outdoors (e.g. on a treadmill or out running) I'll use kilometres and kph, I'd measure things in millimetres or centimetres. Obviously if I was to drive I would have to pay attention to miles per hour, but with a sat nav I wouldn't need to think about how many miles my destination is away from me, as it'd all be in kilometres anyway.
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    I actually use both, equally well.
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    (Original post by Pro Crastination)
    Good question. My sat nav thing on my phone is set to km, when I talk to people about distances I'll most often say how many metres or kilometres away something is, if I'm exercising indoors or outdoors (e.g. on a treadmill or out running) I'll use kilometres and kph, I'd measure things in millimetres or centimetres. Obviously if I was to drive I would have to pay attention to miles per hour, but with a sat nav I wouldn't need to think about how many miles my destination is away from me, as it'd all be in kilometres anyway.
    So in reality you use both then.
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    So in reality you use both then.
    When I start driving (not yet) I will be forced to use both. That isn't the case right now, but even if it was, the vast vast majority of the time I'd be using metric.
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    (Original post by Pro Crastination)
    When I start driving (not yet) I will be forced to use both. That isn't the case right now, but even if it was, the vast vast majority of the time I'd be using metric.
    And the waist size on your trousers? In inches?
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    (Original post by DiddyDec)
    And the waist size on your trousers? In inches?
    Perhaps I should have changed my wording in my first answer. Everything that I have to use imperial measurements for (which is a small handful of things) I don't really have a choice. However, where I have the choice between the two (a reasonable number of things), I'll choose metric, and of course where I don't have a choice I'll use metric.

    Which is how I interpreted the question.
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    Well, considering there are substantially more units derived from metric rather than imperial...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_derived_unit
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    (Original post by leafcannon)
    Well, considering there are substantially more units derived from metric rather than imperial...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_derived_unit
    If you really want to, you can derive them all in imperial.
    1 Hz = 1 s^-1
    1 rad = 1 rad
    1 sr = 1 sr
    1 N = 1 lb * const
    ...
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    If you really want to, you can derive them all in imperial.
    1 Hz = 1 s^-1
    1 rad = 1 rad
    1 sr = 1 sr
    1 N = 1 lb * const
    ...
    Besides, I'm pretty sure you could have imperial units for the thing you're measuring, provided conventional use with equations. For example, energy is foot-pound(force), momentum is pound-feet/second, and so on. There could even be imperial electrical measures if they adopt Amps and Coulombs like they did with seconds and radians (eg Volts = foot-poundf/coulomb).
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    (Original post by leafcannon)
    Besides, I'm pretty sure you could have imperial units for the thing you're measuring, provided conventional use with equations. For example, energy is foot-pound(force), momentum is pound-feet/second, and so on. There could even be imperial electrical measures if they adopt Amps and Coulombs like they did with seconds and radians (eg Volts = foot-poundf/coulomb).
    Yeah. Assuming you extend it where required there's really no difference between it and the metric system except for ease of use. I think Americans use Amps and Coulombs already.

    Shouldn't momentum be poundf-second rather than foot-poundf/second? My head hurts now. edit: No we were both right, you were using pound rather than poundf.
 
 
 
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