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The importance of getting funding during the PhD. Watch

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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    Cambridge doesn't waive residential requirements for part-timers. Oxford does. Therefore most Cambridge part-timers tend to be "on the books" of the university or the NHS in some way or another. There are very few civilians, because you have to live in or around Cambridge.
    Ah that helps explain it. Thanks!
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    (Original post by gutenberg)
    Ah that helps explain it. Thanks!
    In fact, this seems recently to have changed, so we may see more part time research students at Cambridge.

    The reality is that the key to part-time research for humanities students is access to the requisite libraries/archives and a mutually convenient place to conduct supervisions.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    In fact, this seems recently to have changed, so we may see more part time research students at Cambridge.

    The reality is that the key to part-time research for humanities students is access to the requisite libraries/archives and a mutually convenient place to conduct supervisions.
    Interesting. I think generally the attitude towards the residency requirement is becoming more flexible - I know plenty of (full time) students who have never lived in Cambridge during their PhD. Some went the official route & got an exemption, others just told their colleges they were living privately, and made sure to collect their post periodically, and the college asked no questions

    And I agree re: the realities of humanities research. I don't *really* need to be here full time, since my archives are located across the UK, and online. Having access to the library is a key one though. And many supervisors conduct meetings via Skype now.
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    (Original post by Aceadria)
    I've heard some real horror stories about the French system (competitions). Ouch!
    And nepotism.


    (Original post by Aceadria)
    I've noticed this. The History department's website at Oxford clearly states that we should not contact supervisors ahead of making an application. I find this quite frustrating (but understandable as they're probably very busy!).
    Where did you find that? I always contacted my supervisors, :getmecoat: they generally just answer a laconic email, but it's important to know whether the supervisor is going to retire or take a leave.


    On your question about big names, I did my master with the director of a lab, journal, and academic society; she received about 200 emails a day, so couldn't really devote too much time to me, but she was really "efficient", when I asked her something, she got it sorted rapidly, usually by forwarding my email to the right person. So it's possible to have a helpful-great-for-networking-supervisor, but I also met some that simply didn't care about these little worms that don't even have a PhD.

    There was a very long discussion on this subject on gradcafé last year - although it was for the USA.
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    .........
    (Original post by Jantaculum)
    is this the right way round, nulli? (or should I move to Cambridge quickly before anyone notices )
    Ditto, I did my Masters part-time at Cam and they certainly had no residence requirements. And I was aware of folks doing their PhD part-time at Cam when I went full-time and there were no residence requirements. This was circa 2005-08.
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    (Original post by Jantaculum)



    is this the right way round, nulli? (or should I move to Cambridge quickly before anyone notices )
    See my later post. Cambridge seems to have gone down the road Oxford travelled years ago. Cambridge now does not require its research students to live within 10 miles but even so, there are legacies of the past:-

    Employer Declaration
    Candidates who intend to be in employment during their studies must provide a letter from their employer confirming that they may have time off, if necessary, to attend the University as required, for the whole duration of the course. The letter should also state whether or not the employer will wish to discuss intellectual property rights in connection with the research.
    Where an applicant will be employed by working at Cambridge, it will
    also be necessary to consider any intellectual property issues that may arise:
    http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/students/...atutes/ip.html

    "Dear Mr McDonald (or may I call you Ronald),

    I would be grateful if you would please sign this declaration on behalf of the University of Cambridge, where I will be studying part-time confirming, that I may have time off from my zero-hours contract to attend the university as required. I think it is very unlikely that my supervisor will wish to see me at pub chucking out time on a Saturday night and I am sure that I will be given sufficient notice to remove any patties from the grill.

    I have thought very carefully about the intellectual property issues. I suggest a reasonable compromise is that if I invent a new hamburger whilst at work, the rights to that hamburger belong to you, but if I create a new classification of semiotics (or for that matter a semiotic of classifications) whilst sweeping your floor, that belongs to me, can be reproduced in my thesis and be commercialised by Cambridge Enterprise.

    I trust this is acceptable and look forward to hearing from you."
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    (Original post by nulli tertius)
    See my later post. Cambridge seems to have gone down the road Oxford travelled years ago. Cambridge now does not require its research students to live within 10 miles but even so, there are legacies of the past
    Yes, sorry, my computer's as part-time as my degree and it's only just decided to show me the rest of the thread…

    Interestingly enough, most of my colleagues are senior enough to be at a high management level. So their letters went 'I confirm that I will give myself time off to attend University…..'
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    (Original post by gutenberg)
    a) It's important, but not massively so. You'll primarily come into contact with 'the subject group' through the weekly seminars; otherwise, it's primarily an administrative thing. The subject groups (medieval, early modern and so on) meet termly (the senior academics only) to decide on things like who will be in charge of undergrad papers, who will represent the group as exam markers that year, and so on. As a student you won't have much to do with it beyond the seminars, where you'll meet the academics and fellow postgrads. It's very easy to meet others though - attend any of the history seminars and there will be an opportunity to chat with people. I know plenty of people from across the different groups, so you won't be stuck in your little chronological group!

    b) No you don't - as I said, it's primarily a more senior, administrative thing. I don't think students even are assigned formally to a subject group, but most people will identify with one (or more) depending on their research topic, and will mostly interact with postgrads and staff in that area. But really, you're free to meet and talk with whoever, and at Cambridge there are so many opportunities for that.
    Thank you, Gutenberg. Very helpful!
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    (Original post by macromicro)
    Even without loans it's very much possible to self-fund a full-time PhD. Fees are £9-12k which you can save in a year of full-time work if you live at home and/or live frugally. After that all you need is money for rent and living costs which can be earned just through weekend work if you choose a department in a city with low average costs (as long as a suitable supervisor is there of course). If you are willing to live frugally, be flexible with location, and are genuinely passionate about your subject then self-funding a full-time PhD is not particularly difficult. Most people waste a lot of money and mis-manage their time which makes them think it's an onerous task. I'm part-funded (tuition fee waiver) and have found it very comfortable. Being part-funded hasn't made it financially "easier" in the sense that my month to month cash flow/working hours would be the same with or without the scholarship - it simply meant I didn't have to hand over my savings which anyone can acquire in a year of hard work.
    Thanks a lot!
 
 
 
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