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    (Original post by ARK_REVISES)
    I'm currently in Year 11, and I am predicted to get an A*in Maths at GCSE-level.

    So my question is that how difficult is it from gcse. I have got always times for Maths and I am really committed to my work at all times.

    Oh also how many hours do you spend on it at college and how many hours do YOU do maths during your free time in a week.
    Im year 12 currently taking maths, maths at a level is a lot more harder than GCSEs in my opinion but if you are organised and committed to your studies you won't have any trouble in maths, just make sure you keep on top of everything and most importantly PRACTICE PAST PAPERS. I really i would spend about 3-4 hours a week minimum , but gradually increase that when it comes closer to exams
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    (Original post by ARK_REVISES)
    Are you or have you done Further maths at A-levels, is it fun and easy if you are good at normal a level maths.
    Unfortunately I don't do further maths, but normal maths is really fun to me. I've always found maths really simple and straight forward. That's probably why I find it slightly easier than my other subjects which are sciences. I think if you enjoy something you'll do better at it.
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    (Original post by NadeemKha_Arab)
    Unfortunately I don't do further maths, but normal maths is really fun to me. I've always found maths really simple and straight forward. That's probably why I find it slightly easier than my other subjects which are sciences. I think if you enjoy something you'll do better at it.
    Are you doing chemistry and physics cos I'm thinking of doing it in A-level. If u are doing it is it hard and how many hours do u spent on AS or spend now at A2
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    (Original post by ARK_REVISES)
    Are you doing chemistry and physics cos I'm thinking of doing it in A-level. If u are doing it is it hard and how many hours do u spent on AS or spend now at A2
    I'm doing chem and biology (heading down the medicine route hopefully). Chemistry was probably the second easiest for me, followed by biology. Bio and Chem each had their own ups and downs and each one interests me in different ways. I just choose biology to be harder because of the way you have to answer the questions almost word perfect (one slip up, you lose a mark). In terms of chemistry, I found that you do have to learn it. Learn the reactions and the earlier you start the better. I suggest getting straight into revision as soon as you get into AS. It's very tempting to leave it a few months down the line but honestly from someone who didn't revise thoroughly until Easter in AS, I really suggest getting stuck in straight away. Looking back at it at A2 I realised how much easier AS was and I wish I had tried harder, but again I had my own personal reasons for not doing my absolute best. I am resitting one unit of each subject though to 'up' my marks so i'm hoping to try and get a lot more in chemistry and hopefully get full marks in the maths paper. Can't say much about Physics though, sorry
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    Although I must point out, because I didn't do Physics at AS, I had to do statistics in one module of maths instead of mechanics. I'm not sure how it works now though with A-levels changing and all that.
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    (Original post by ARK_REVISES)
    Are you or have you done Further maths at A-levels, is it fun and easy if you are good at normal a level maths.
    I'm currently doing further maths at AS level I really enjoy it I find that mechanics 2 is hard at first to get my head around it but further pure 1 and mechanics 1 are pretty straight forward. There isn't much of an overlap with AS normal maths with the modules I'm taking but some things in FP1 come up in A2 normal maths.
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    (Original post by Hawianpizza69)
    Im year 12 currently taking maths, maths at a level is a lot more harder than GCSEs in my opinion but if you are organised and committed to your studies you won't have any trouble in maths, just make sure you keep on top of everything and most importantly PRACTICE PAST PAPERS. I really i would spend about 3-4 hours a week minimum , but gradually increase that when it comes closer to exams
    in college i have about two free periods everyday which means i have 10 free periods a week , so i do about three periods of maths in college a week which is about 2 and a half hours of maths in college and a couple hours outside college, make sure you balance time on your subjects , I've got a lot of free periods cos i only take three AS subjects, if you take 4 your time table might have less free periods
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    I'm currently in year 13, so studying A2 maths.

    I actually got an A at GCSE and I still found that AS wasn't a huge jump in terms of the content. I'm on edexcel so core 2 was where I felt there was a lot of new content. A lot of people worry about maths but seriously, if you really are willing to keep up with the homework and make some good notes for future reference when you do learn it - you don't have to be a genius to do well! Especially if you're predicted an A*.

    Keeping up with the new content is vital, especially in A2 as a lot of chapters rely on your knowledge of previous work. I would know that not keeping up with the homework with so much new learning at A2 especially is a recipe for disaster
    Hard work, homework and past papers and you can't go wrong.

    Good luck with your GCSE's!

    Edit: At the moment I do around 4.5hours of maths at school and around 8-10 hours a week at home. However, only because its so close to exams. We were recommended 5 hours on top of school work at AS and 6 at A2.
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    D1 module: prepare to be bored.
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    (Original post by ARK_REVISES)
    Are you sure??? but how, plz could you tell me
    Tell you what?
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    I got an A at AS, currently on track to get an A* at A2. honestly I don't think its that hard you just need to be willing to put time in and make sure you understand everything that is taught in class. if you don't understand it you need to get extra help or go over it in your own time. if you do that revision is easy because you are just making sure that you remember everything. I think its pretty easy to get 90%+ if you practice proper technique and learn to avoid silly mistakes.
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    (Original post by NadeemKha_Arab)
    I'm doing chem and biology (heading down the medicine route hopefully). Chemistry was probably the second easiest for me, followed by biology. Bio and Chem each had their own ups and downs and each one interests me in different ways. I just choose biology to be harder because of the way you have to answer the questions almost word perfect (one slip up, you lose a mark). In terms of chemistry, I found that you do have to learn it. Learn the reactions and the earlier you start the better. I suggest getting straight into revision as soon as you get into AS. It's very tempting to leave it a few months down the line but honestly from someone who didn't revise thoroughly until Easter in AS, I really suggest getting stuck in straight away. Looking back at it at A2 I realised how much easier AS was and I wish I had tried harder, but again I had my own personal reasons for not doing my absolute best. I am resitting one unit of each subject though to 'up' my marks so i'm hoping to try and get a lot more in chemistry and hopefully get full marks in the maths paper. Can't say much about Physics though, sorry
    nah it helps
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    (Original post by Hawianpizza69)
    in college i have about two free periods everyday which means i have 10 free periods a week , so i do about three periods of maths in college a week which is about 2 and a half hours of maths in college and a couple hours outside college, make sure you balance time on your subjects , I've got a lot of free periods cos i only take three AS subjects, if you take 4 your time table might have less free periods
    tnx for the advice, now im confused whether I should pick 3 or 4 courses. If I do 3 then it is going to be maths, physics, further maths( or chemistry). but the problem is I love all of em and I dont want to make any mistake on choosing 3/4 courses
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    (Original post by meloj)
    I'm currently in year 13, so studying A2 maths.

    I actually got an A at GCSE and I still found that AS wasn't a huge jump in terms of the content. I'm on edexcel so core 2 was where I felt there was a lot of new content. A lot of people worry about maths but seriously, if you really are willing to keep up with the homework and make some good notes for future reference when you do learn it - you don't have to be a genius to do well! Especially if you're predicted an A*.

    Keeping up with the new content is vital, especially in A2 as a lot of chapters rely on your knowledge of previous work. I would know that not keeping up with the homework with so much new learning at A2 especially is a recipe for disaster
    Hard work, homework and past papers and you can't go wrong.

    Good luck with your GCSE's!

    Edit: At the moment I do around 4.5hours of maths at school and around 8-10 hours a week at home. However, only because its so close to exams. We were recommended 5 hours on top of school work at AS and 6 at A2.
    I'm okay with the core modules, but what im really bogged down about is the Decision and Mechanics. Is it something that I have learnt or is it going to be learned in A level.
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    D1 module: prepare to be bored.
    Plz tell is it hard??? or something
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Tell you what?
    what??
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    Personally, I found maths GCSE really boring and at times, harder than A Level (I'm only in year 12 though). If you practice hard enough there's no reason why you couldn't get 100% across C1, C2 and maybe your chosen module: stats, which I'm doing and it's currently draining the life out of me, decision or mechanics.
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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Personally, I found maths GCSE really boring and at times, harder than A Level (I'm only in year 12 though). If you practice hard enough there's no reason why you couldn't get 100% across C1, C2 and maybe your chosen module: stats, which I'm doing and it's currently draining the life out of me, decision or mechanics.
    I can't say anything but if u tried similarly at gcse level u could have got A* and it is fun I guess


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    (Original post by TianaEsther)
    Personally, I found maths GCSE really boring and at times, harder than A Level (I'm only in year 12 though). If you practice hard enough there's no reason why you couldn't get 100% across C1, C2 and maybe your chosen module: stats, which I'm doing and it's currently draining the life out of me, decision or mechanics.
    What did you get in GCSE maths and AS/A2?
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    Others may disagree but I personally find it a bigger step from C1 to C2 or D1 than GCSE to C1.

    As others have said though, practice a lot and do past papers and like with any A-level, you should be fine.
 
 
 
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