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    (Original post by Vennec)
    I would say that I am a firm believer in there being a distinct but often overlooked difference between being alive and living. We need fun, happiness and some level of danger to feel truly alive, and those things may vary depending on the individual. But we put so much focus on people being physically alive rather than emotionally so. We need both, because without one or the other we are arguably neither.

    Some people find work or their job the best thing ever, but for some people it is not so enthralling. For the people who work in a dead-end or boring because they are forced to, there is no enjoyment or motivation to do better -- and that motivation or determination is often the difference between making an society-changing breakthrough and not. People who work all the time, whose life is unbalanced, will be emotionally and mentally drained constantly, and that sort of health is neither beneficial or serving.

    We should definitely be paying more attention to the earth, I agree with you there. We abuse it so much at present, we need to be less PC and more focused and logical when it comes to issues such as overpopulation and industrialism.
    I agree, I personally believe we should put more effort into solving poverty which actually kills people than something more trivial like electricity, which for the most part we can function without. Your belief on physical and emotional aspects justifying our existence has honestly inspired me.

    Furthermore, your analogy on jobs and motivation makes sense to me as well. I've realised that I will never be happy whilst working in a dead end job as I will likely never make a society-changing breakthrough. If society focused more on less trivial things I feel as if we will all be able to emotionally evolve as a race!
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    (Original post by the bear)
    Death. the big D...

    there is not a lot to say about it... Death is not open to dialogue; it cannot be bargained with.

    After Death... nobody has ever told us what it is like to be dead.

    As you would expect Master Shakeshaft has the last word:

    Fear no more the heat o' the sun;
    Nor the furious winter's rages,
    Thou thy worldly task hast done,
    Home art gone, and ta'en thy wages;
    Golden lads and girls all must,
    As chimney sweepers come to dust.

    Fear no more the frown of the great,
    Thou art past the tyrant's stroke:
    Care no more to clothe and eat;
    To thee the reed is as the oak:
    The sceptre, learning, physic, must
    All follow this, and come to dust.

    Fear no more the lightning-flash,
    Nor the all-dread thunder-stone;
    Fear not slander, censure rash;
    Thou hast finished joy and moan;
    All lovers young, all lovers must
    Consign to thee, and come to dust.

    No exorciser harm thee!
    Nor no witchcraft charm thee!
    Ghost unlaid forbear thee!
    Nothing ill come near thee!
    Quiet consummation have;
    And renowned be thy grave!

    Wow, did you write all that?
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    (Original post by IGCSEKid)
    Wow, did you write all that?
    no

    it is a beautiful poem from Cymbeline by William Shakespeare, our greatest playwright.
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    (Original post by the bear)
    no

    it is a beautiful poem from Cymbeline by William Shakespeare, our greatest playwright.
    Oh, I thought so
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    (Original post by IGCSEKid)
    Oh, I thought so
    but i could have done ...
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    (Original post by the bear)
    but i could have done ...
    I despise Shakespeare as it was his literature that has caused hours of unnecessary work studying his life. Well, at least his views were alright.
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    (Original post by HurtfulHarold)
    I despise Shakespeare as it was his literature that has caused hours of unnecessary work studying his life. Well, at least his views were alright.
    Harold i hope you do not think me impertinent when i say you look older than 16 in your photo ?

    :holmes:
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    (Original post by the bear)
    Harold i hope you do not think me impertinent when i say you look older than 16 in your photo ?

    :holmes:
    I am indeed sixteen but I feel as if I have fostered the personality of a skeptical, disgruntled 60 year old man, hence the picture of the famous internet meme as my avatar!
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    (Original post by Blondie987)
    I think we should personally look for the things that make us happy and fulfilled, while i think it's interesting and important to consider why we're here, I don't think it should take up so much time as to distract us from using our existence, which, regardless of how it came to be is freaking amazing, to make ourselves and others happy.
    Except happiness is unreliable. We rely upon others, our material assets, our health, good fortune, and numerous other continually fluctuating and unreliable factors for our happiness. Most of us spend our entire lives in the pursuit of happiness, rather than experiencing it. We convince ourselves that the absence of pain is pleasure, when it is in fact neither. Our lives are largely spent experiencing pain or the absence of pleasure, rather than pleasure itself—save for those fortunate enough in circumstance.

    Lucy Westenra from Dracula sums it up well:

    “How blessed are some people, whose lives have no fears, no dreads; to whom sleep is a blessing that comes nightly, and brings nothing but sweet dreams.”
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    (Original post by HurtfulHarold)
    I agree, I personally believe we should put more effort into solving poverty which actually kills people than something more trivial like electricity, which for the most part we can function without. Your belief on physical and emotional aspects justifying our existence has honestly inspired me.

    Furthermore, your analogy on jobs and motivation makes sense to me as well. I've realised that I will never be happy whilst working in a dead end job as I will likely never make a society-changing breakthrough. If society focused more on less trivial things I feel as if we will all be able to emotionally evolve as a race!
    There are many things we have that we can do without. I was discussing the concept of minimalism the other day, of giving up worldly possessions so that you have more time to devote to yourself and less time to devote to trivial things -- which can often be the cause of stress. Most people these days go to a job they don't enjoy, pay for a house they're barely in, pay for objects they don't need and then have to worry about losing them, breaking them, having other people steal them or not having enough of something or having too much. What happens? What sort of atmosphere is in your house? Can you call yourself free if you're tied up and tied down?

    And if we didn't have these possessions how many more homes could we give people?

    Another analogy, my favourite in fact and one I often come back to, is riding motorcycles versus driving cars. Motorcyclists are far more vulnerable than car drivers, that is well-known; if you come across a collision between a biker and a driver then it's almost certain the motorcyclist will be the one with more serious injuries. But when you ride there is something immensely more intimate and awakening. I haven't yet ridden, I must confess (but I will, even if it kills me), but motorcyclists have captured my heart because when you're on a motorcycle you are there in the moment. You are exposed. You are mortal and conscious of that every waking moment. As you turn into each corner or accelerate you become one with the bike and it's such a powerful experience. In a car, it's like you're in a cage or a bubble. You're not always aware of your own mortality because you're too protected; everything that happens is out there, you're not involved, and you're not spiritually moving either. Physically, yes, but unless you're a petrolhead with an avid love of cars, there's nowhere near that same level of emotion, of connection.

    You can make a life-changing breakthrough. Given enough time and passion, you can make a difference in one way or another. Just because you work at ASDA or Primark doesn't mean you can't offer something great. There are people out there with no formal education who have contributed to society, even if that's just on a local level. Homeless people with ideas or experiences. Your worth isn't measured by what employment you do.

    But I always say if you can't just get up one day and walk out the door and go travelling on a whim then you're doing something wrong.
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    (Original post by HurtfulHarold)
    I agree with you, experiences do make our lives special and unique. However, I can't help but feeling that there has to be a reason for our existence, besides survival and having fun. Do you think we have to search for a personal reason behind our lives, or do you think all of us should have similar aims?
    Power and wealth are the only things that will go some way to anaesthetising the crippling horror that comes with realising we are bacteria on a spherical petri dish hurtling through empty space with only a wafer thin atmosphere shielding us from instant decimation until the sun finally explodes and evaporates the oceans and sets the trees alight and incinerates every single life form on the planet, leaving no traceable record that a single member of the human race ever existed.

    Have a pleasant evening.
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    (Original post by a noble chance)
    Power and wealth are the only things that will go some way to anaesthetising the crippling horror that comes with realising we are bacteria on a spherical petri dish hurtling through empty space with only a wafer thin atmosphere shielding us from instant decimation until the sun finally explodes and evaporates the oceans and sets the trees alight and incinerates every single life form on the planet, leaving no traceable record that a single member of the human race ever existed.

    Have a pleasant evening.
    Lovely. Although amusing, we shouldn't try to look at life in that light.
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    (Original post by Vennec)
    There are many things we have that we can do without. I was discussing the concept of minimalism the other day, of giving up worldly possessions so that you have more time to devote to yourself and less time to devote to trivial things -- which can often be the cause of stress. Most people these days go to a job they don't enjoy, pay for a house they're barely in, pay for objects they don't need and then have to worry about losing them, breaking them, having other people steal them or not having enough of something or having too much. What happens? What sort of atmosphere is in your house? Can you call yourself free if you're tied up and tied down?

    And if we didn't have these possessions how many more homes could we give people?

    Another analogy, my favourite in fact and one I often come back to, is riding motorcycles versus driving cars. Motorcyclists are far more vulnerable than car drivers, that is well-known; if you come across a collision between a biker and a driver then it's almost certain the motorcyclist will be the one with more serious injuries. But when you ride there is something immensely more intimate and awakening. I haven't yet ridden, I must confess (but I will, even if it kills me), but motorcyclists have captured my heart because when you're on a motorcycle you are there in the moment. You are exposed. You are mortal and conscious of that every waking moment. As you turn into each corner or accelerate you become one with the bike and it's such a powerful experience. In a car, it's like you're in a cage or a bubble. You're not always aware of your own mortality because you're too protected; everything that happens is out there, you're not involved, and you're not spiritually moving either. Physically, yes, but unless you're a petrolhead with an avid love of cars, there's nowhere near that same level of emotion, of connection.

    You can make a life-changing breakthrough. Given enough time and passion, you can make a difference in one way or another. Just because you work at ASDA or Primark doesn't mean you can't offer something great. There are people out there with no formal education who have contributed to society, even if that's just on a local level. Homeless people with ideas or experiences. Your worth isn't measured by what employment you do.

    But I always say if you can't just get up one day and walk out the door and go travelling on a whim then you're doing something wrong.
    Oh, I get you now. That motorbike analogy is brilliant, how many have you got by the way? We do need a sense of danger to feel alive, but I would argue that riding a motorbike may be too dangerous. What do you mean by the last thing you said?
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    (Original post by HurtfulHarold)
    Lovely. Although amusing, we shouldn't try to look at life in that light.
    I wonder whether it's possible for a non-vegetative person to live a truly contented life without first reconciling themselves with this brutal reality.
    Those chirpy people who aren't the sort to deliberately think of this stuff and seem to get on without a care in the world are always those who look the most unsure and uprooted when they think nobody is looking
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    If you want to know about "Life" the video below is VERY VERY deep...

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    (Original post by a noble chance)
    I wonder whether it's possible for a non-vegetative person to live a truly contented life without first reconciling themselves with this brutal reality.
    Those chirpy people who aren't the sort to deliberately think of this stuff and seem to get on without a care in the world are always those who look the most unsure and uprooted when they think nobody is looking
    Probably not, every has to realise the brutal reality of Earth at some point.
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    (Original post by HurtfulHarold)
    Oh, I get you now. That motorbike analogy is brilliant, how many have you got by the way? We do need a sense of danger to feel alive, but I would argue that riding a motorbike may be too dangerous. What do you mean by the last thing you said?
    Admittedly, none. Don't even have a license yet. Plan on learning to ride and saving up while I'm at Uni, which I'll be heading into later this year. I've watched so many videos, read many quotes from bikers and had so many dreams of riding it's become a passion -- for many people including myself.

    I would argue that riding a motorcycle does have its dangers, but at the same time it has its benefits and rewards. A motorcycle in and of itself is like a gun, it's minimally dangerous. It's the human in the vehicle next to it and the vehicle holding the handlebars (or the human holding the gun) that is the greatest danger. Objects are seldom dangerous until something changes to make them so. I don't know if you've ever ridden a motorbike, if not then I would actually recommend you go on a countryside trip with someone as a pillion (passenger), perhaps for a few days so you really get immersed in the experience.

    If you don't have experience then it can be more dangerous, yes. As an example, new riders especially, going on the motorbike analogy, will often crash because of the instincts that are supposed to keep them safe -- like by grabbing a handful of brakes when they need to stop, which will actually throw them off the bike. But veteran and experienced riders learn to override these, and anyone who has experience in anything must begin somewhere.

    The last thing I said, "But I always say if you can't just get up one day and walk out the door and go travelling on a whim then you're doing something wrong."

    If you can't do this then you're attached to something or afraid of something. Perhaps afraid of leaving your home, afraid of travelling with someone or on your own, afraid of money, or leaving someone behind even if it's only temporary. You're tied down by something and whatever that something is, it owns you, even if you're not conscious of it. Whatever that is, it is arguably a source and cause of stress, which is what is "wrong".
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    (Original post by Vennec)
    Admittedly, none. Don't even have a license yet. Plan on learning to ride and saving up while I'm at Uni, which I'll be heading into later this year. I've watched so many videos, read many quotes from bikers and had so many dreams of riding it's become a passion -- for many people including myself.

    I would argue that riding a motorcycle does have its dangers, but at the same time it has its benefits and rewards. A motorcycle in and of itself is like a gun, it's minimally dangerous. It's the human in the vehicle next to it and the vehicle holding the handlebars (or the human holding the gun) that is the greatest danger. Objects are seldom dangerous until something changes to make them so. I don't know if you've ever ridden a motorbike, if not then I would actually recommend you go on a countryside trip with someone as a pillion (passenger), perhaps for a few days so you really get immersed in the experience.

    If you don't have experience then it can be more dangerous, yes. As an example, new riders especially, going on the motorbike analogy, will often crash because of the instincts that are supposed to keep them safe -- like by grabbing a handful of brakes when they need to stop, which will actually throw them off the bike. But veteran and experienced riders learn to override these, and anyone who has experience in anything must begin somewhere.

    The last thing I said, "But I always say if you can't just get up one day and walk out the door and go travelling on a whim then you're doing something wrong."

    If you can't do this then you're attached to something or afraid of something. Perhaps afraid of leaving your home, afraid of travelling with someone or on your own, afraid of money, or leaving someone behind even if it's only temporary. You're tied down by something and whatever that something is, it owns you, even if you're not conscious of it. Whatever that is, it is arguably a source and cause of stress, which is what is "wrong".
    Would life be worth living to you if we didn't produce adrenaline?
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    (Original post by Kiytt)
    Would life be worth living to you if we didn't produce adrenaline?
    Yes.

    I live a very calm life at present. I see many things worth living for.
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    (Original post by Vennec)
    Yes.

    I live a very calm life at present. I see many things worth living for.
    Do you think it's fair to classify everyone who doesn't see anything worth living for as depressed? Do you think they are somehow ignorant? Not that you do or have, just asking out of curiosity, having observed it myself.
 
 
 
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