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4 Months and Counting - Unemployment Continues Watch

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    (Original post by Souljer)
    Just get a job in a retail place


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    You speak as it is as simple as drinking this water I am currently drinking.

    I just spilled it on myself however, is that a bad sign?
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    In short I'm not great at being put on the spot, which is just a slight barrier! Initially I didn't have a clue how to answer interview questions- at the second interview I had I messed up both 'talk us through your CV' and 'what would you bring to the team' because I didn't have a clue how to answer either question. I've since been to an interview workshop which has helped me to draw up good answers to questions I'm expecting when I'm at home, however actually getting them out in the interview is another thing. I had one very near miss where they said I just hadn't quite got my enthusiasm across for their sector, I'd had a brilliant answer put together for 'why do you want to work for us' but forgot half of it in suprise as being asked it as the very first question. Then my most recent interview, no formal rejection yet but they asked a competency question, it covered an area I wasn't very experienced in and wasn't expecting to come up as it wasn't in the person spec and they had to ask me for my role because I couldn't put everything together in my head when I initially answered.

    Sorry that is so long!
    A couple of things you need to internalize.

    Firstly, treat the interview like a conversation. They are screening a potential asset to the company as you are screening them as a company that will further your career path. Talk to them on a mutual level and don't frame an interview like an interrogation. Ultimately, you want to believe that you are doing them a favour by hiring you. Adjust your answers to any questions accordingly.

    Secondly, an interview is like sales. And I would urge any current student, regardless of background, to take a proactive interest into the art of sales. You are a product and your goal is to let them buy into you. This really takes place outside of the academic, competency and qualifications arena. Your CV has all of that information so being in the room with the decision-maker means that you have qualified whatever competencies or qualifications they are asking for on paper.

    What they are looking for in an interview is what differentiates your professional attitude to your competitors (i.e. the next applicant). They are looking for raw personality, which cannot be defined by a degree or a project management certification.

    What do you bring to the table? That is the question it all boils down too. What is your value when you're stacked against someone else?

    A few things to consider when thinking about your value. Very simply, are you a fighter or a quitter? Do you lose your head under pressure? How do you deal with constant stress? What can you do to get the best out of the people you work with? Are you a positive or negative influence to the people around you? Are you somebody looking for a paycheck or are you somebody with ambition? Do you often need new challenges? Are you the type of person who gets bored easily and wants to refine their role outside of their original job description?

    This is my initial reaction to your post, but it is very general. Like I said with Failedteacher, shoot me over your CV and/or particular questions and I'll answer them.
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    A couple of things you need to internalize.

    Firstly, treat the interview like a conversation. They are screening a potential asset to the company as you are screening them as a company that will further your career path. Talk to them on a mutual level and don't frame an interview like an interrogation. Ultimately, you want to believe that you are doing them a favour by hiring you. Adjust your answers to any questions accordingly.

    Secondly, an interview is like sales. And I would urge any current student, regardless of background, to take a proactive interest into the art of sales. You are a product and your goal is to let them buy into you. This really takes place outside of the academic, competency and qualifications arena. Your CV has all of that information so being in the room with the decision-maker means that you have qualified whatever competencies or qualifications they are asking for on paper.

    What they are looking for in an interview is what differentiates your professional attitude to your competitors (i.e. the next applicant). They are looking for raw personality, which cannot be defined by a degree or a project management certification.

    What do you bring to the table? That is the question it all boils down too. What is your value when you're stacked against someone else?

    A few things to consider when thinking about your value. Very simply, are you a fighter or a quitter? Do you lose your head under pressure? How do you deal with constant stress? What can you do to get the best out of the people you work with? Are you a positive or negative influence to the people around you? Are you somebody looking for a paycheck or are you somebody with ambition? Do you often need new challenges? Are you the type of person who gets bored easily and wants to refine their role outside of their original job description?

    This is my initial reaction to your post, but it is very general. Like I said with Failedteacher, shoot me over your CV and/or particular questions and I'll answer them.
    I do try to, but its easier said than done!
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    A couple of things you need to internalize.

    Firstly, treat the interview like a conversation. They are screening a potential asset to the company as you are screening them as a company that will further your career path. Talk to them on a mutual level and don't frame an interview like an interrogation. Ultimately, you want to believe that you are doing them a favour by hiring you. Adjust your answers to any questions accordingly.

    Secondly, an interview is like sales. And I would urge any current student, regardless of background, to take a proactive interest into the art of sales. You are a product and your goal is to let them buy into you. This really takes place outside of the academic, competency and qualifications arena. Your CV has all of that information so being in the room with the decision-maker means that you have qualified whatever competencies or qualifications they are asking for on paper.

    What they are looking for in an interview is what differentiates your professional attitude to your competitors (i.e. the next applicant). They are looking for raw personality, which cannot be defined by a degree or a project management certification.

    What do you bring to the table? That is the question it all boils down too. What is your value when you're stacked against someone else?

    A few things to consider when thinking about your value. Very simply, are you a fighter or a quitter? Do you lose your head under pressure? How do you deal with constant stress? What can you do to get the best out of the people you work with? Are you a positive or negative influence to the people around you? Are you somebody looking for a paycheck or are you somebody with ambition? Do you often need new challenges? Are you the type of person who gets bored easily and wants to refine their role outside of their original job description?

    This is my initial reaction to your post, but it is very general. Like I said with Failedteacher, shoot me over your CV and/or particular questions and I'll answer them.
    Again I must ask, how do I give you access to my CV through the student rooms?
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    (Original post by FailedTeacher)
    Again I must ask, how do I give you access to my CV through the student rooms?
    Maybe PM him for his email address and forward it to him?

    Anyway I've recently been interviewing potential new staff for work recently and one thing I'll say is that the people who came in and just treated it like a conversation came across much better.

    They'd already passed online tests and competency scoring so at that stage I was more impressed with those who didn't come across as desperate.

    I'm not for one minute saying that's how you come across, and I'm only saying desperate for want of a better word.
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    **** like this is why I'm really not looking forward to finishing uni (despite the fact I'm hating uni).
    I wouldn't even know where to begin with getting on the career ladder and any "advice" I have been given has been pretty useless or not applicable in the past.
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    (Original post by Mega0448)
    Maybe PM him for his email address and forward it to him?

    Anyway I've recently been interviewing potential new staff for work recently and one thing I'll say is that the people who came in and just treated it like a conversation came across much better.

    They'd already passed online tests and competency scoring so at that stage I was more impressed with those who didn't come across as desperate.

    I'm not for one minute saying that's how you come across, and I'm only saying desperate for want of a better word.
    That is how I do it really, I try and bring out who I am in and be sincere and not try and second guess the interviews or say what I think they want to hear.
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    (Original post by SophieSmall)
    **** like this is why I'm really not looking forward to finishing uni (despite the fact I'm hating uni).
    I wouldn't even know where to begin with getting on the career ladder and any "advice" I have been given has been pretty useless or not applicable in the past.
    Start making connections now! Get a Linkedin account, start voluntary/ relevant work experience. Register your interest with some companies.
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    You need to toughen up and develop a bit of focus and a mental attitude that will get you through. Fourth months is nothing, but its your expectations thats piling the pressure on. If you are failing somewhere along the line then work on it. you are getting to interview stage, so get feedback and work on improving. Be philosophical and find an balance between being determined and coping with the present status quo. i really wouldnt worry.
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    (Original post by FailedTeacher)
    Start making connections now! Get a Linkedin account, start voluntary/ relevant work experience. Register your interest with some companies.
    A lot easier said than done, especially when you have no idea what you want to do with your life.

    I'm doing a biomed degree. And getting work experience in the field is really hard, only I think 5- 10 people out of my 180ish people course managed to get a placement for a placement year. And on top of that I don't think I even want to work in the industry any more. 3 years of this has made me realise I hate lab work and the thought of having to do that 5 days a week is just depressing. But I don't know what else to do or where to even start with figuring out what to do.
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    (Original post by FailedTeacher)
    Again I must ask, how do I give you access to my CV through the student rooms?
    Provide a dropbox link or something on those lines.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I do try to, but its easier said than done!
    To be frank, you aren't trying hard enough. Or at least, you're going to have to deal with the source of what is making you freeze.

    Do you typically find yourself thriving under pressure or are you a worrier?
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    (Original post by VeniViciVidi)
    To be frank, you aren't trying hard enough. Or at least, you're going to have to deal with the source of what is making you freeze.

    Do you typically find yourself thriving under pressure or are you a worrier?
    I don't totally freeze, I just can't give my best answers. I'm dyspraxic and I can't help wonder if that is part of the cause, according to the dyspraxia foundation website one of the symptoms can be 'Difficulty in planning and organising thought.' As I said I've had interview help and I prepare and practice as much as I can before hand but there is only so much I can do when I don't know the interview questions and what order they'll be in. Obviously I am always looking for ways I can improve.

    So just think a little bit more before you make tactless comments, you don't know a persons circumstances.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    You need to toughen up and develop a bit of focus and a mental attitude that will get you through. Fourth months is nothing, but its your expectations thats piling the pressure on. If you are failing somewhere along the line then work on it. you are getting to interview stage, so get feedback and work on improving. Be philosophical and find an balance between being determined and coping with the present status quo. i really wouldnt worry.
    I completely agree, I was just feeling down I always feel great to speak out about my feelings.

    I think it's an experience issue so in looking into gateway jobs. but that is proving difficult.

    Thank you for your message
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    (Original post by FailedTeacher)
    I completely agree, I was just feeling down I always feel great to speak out about my feelings.

    I think it's an experience issue so in looking into gateway jobs. but that is proving difficult.

    Thank you for your message
    If they are inviting you to interview, then theres is enough there for them to give you the job. You need to do your best and if they arent interested in that then mobe on without recrimination or getting down on yourself. You cant be what you are not. If you got to 2 years then I think it woyld be tough, but at the moment its really not a long time, just alter your expectations.
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    (Original post by FailedTeacher)
    Good Afternoon!

    As the thread suggests I've been unemployed for 4 months after leaving teacher training and struggling to find a graduate job.

    Now I have applied for lots, as despite popular belief, there are actually many opportunities for most graduates!

    But still, actually finding those opportunities, passing the screening, phone interviews, face to face interviews and sometimes further stages is a whole different story.

    Feeling quite down today so I wondered if anyone else would be willing to share their graduate unemployment sorrows?

    If anyone is interested, I graduated with a First Class in Education Studies with Psychology and have minor experiences within the employment world of typically student part-time jobs. Recently looking to break into the Recruitment Industry and naturally specialise in the Education Sector.
    (Original post by Souljer)
    Just get a job in a retail place


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    best of luck mate, i am routing for you.
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    'A lot easier said than done' is not an excuse, I'm sorry but it's just not.

    I've been networking, reaching out to people and having coffees with bankers, consultants, even senior professionals etc since I was 15. I guarantee that if you actually take the time out to send people on Linkedin personalised messages or reach out to uni/school alumni, you will get a response. Nothing is going to come into fruition by you sitting down on your bum, typing out the above line. But something WILL come into fruition if you actually try.

    Networking is a means of connecting with people and finding common ground. The only way to get better at it is to practice, don't be afraid, just start.

    My god people, get some gumption and grit.

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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    'A lot easier said than done' is not an excuse, I'm sorry but it's just not.

    I've been networking, reaching out to people and having coffees with bankers, consultants, even senior professionals etc since I was 15. I guarantee that if you actually take the time out to send people on Linkedin personalised messages or reach out to uni/school alumni, you will get a response. Nothing is going to come into fruition by you sitting down on your bum, typing out the above line. But something WILL come into fruition if you actually try.

    Networking is a means of connecting with people and finding common ground. The only way to get better at it is to practice, don't be afraid, just start.

    My god people, get some gumption and grit.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Since I think I'm the only person to say that phrase on this thread I'm going to assume this post was directed at me.

    When I made that post I was mostly referring to getting experience in the field (which I don't even want any more) + figuring out what to do with my life. The first has proved difficult, the latter really is easier said than done. I have no clue what direction to go in.

    As for networking, when I wanted to stay in the field I'm studying I did try that. And what I found from literally every person I contacted is they either don't reply or they make it very clear they don't have time for you/ want you in the way. Maybe my field is just more hostile, I don't know. But it's made me very sure I do not want to work in this environment.
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    (Original post by Princepieman)
    'A lot easier said than done' is not an excuse, I'm sorry but it's just not.

    I've been networking, reaching out to people and having coffees with bankers, consultants, even senior professionals etc since I was 15. I guarantee that if you actually take the time out to send people on Linkedin personalised messages or reach out to uni/school alumni, you will get a response. Nothing is going to come into fruition by you sitting down on your bum, typing out the above line. But something WILL come into fruition if you actually try.

    Networking is a means of connecting with people and finding common ground. The only way to get better at it is to practice, don't be afraid, just start.

    My god people, get some gumption and grit.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I also said it, but no matter how hard you network you still need to be able to pass an interview.
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    (Original post by jelly1000)
    I also said it, but no matter how hard you network you still need to be able to pass an interview.
    Very true. But networking does make life easier, it gives you a chance to figure out what you're expected to showcase during an interview and also, gives you insight into the culture of workplace.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
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