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Why don't we have 'assistant doctors' who can prescribe low-level medication? watch

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    (Original post by moonkatt)
    I don't think they can yet, but it's something I imagine they'll be able to do in the future.
    you are potentially looking at 30 + years in the future based on other professionsattempts to get access to None Medical Prescribing

    IHCD blue book was published in 1985 (along with stat exemption drug list), CPSM Paramedic register opened in 1999 (giving access to PGDs etc) , Paramedic Independent Prescribing was rejected (again) in 2015 ...
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    funnily enough i can;t really thinkof any profession where thereis a 'assistant professional' who is not at the techncian level

    Law and accounting have developed their historical ' trained assistant' grades into parallel professions the law with legal executives as well as thediffering focus of theSolictor and Barrister , and in the case of accounting two parallel professions thecertified accountant and theaccounting technician bothof whom were originally assistant grades with chartered accountants being the original Professional qualification
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    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    All industries (accounting, law, engineering and so on) have them: the person who is a step below the "qualified" professional and can engage in low-level, basic professional tasks.

    In light of the strain on the NHS, especially GP surgeries, why don't we introduce 'assistant doctors'. These would be people who had to undergo some training, but less than that of a doctor and a nurse (not requiring a degree) and it would be largely vocational in nature. They would then be authorised to deal with/prescribe for minor ailments at the GP surgery and hospital.
    You mean like a pharmacist or nurse practitioner?


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    (Original post by Grand High Witch)
    All industries (accounting, law, engineering and so on) have them: the person who is a step below the "qualified" professional and can engage in low-level, basic professional tasks.

    In light of the strain on the NHS, especially GP surgeries, why don't we introduce 'assistant doctors'. These would be people who had to undergo some training, but less than that of a doctor and a nurse (not requiring a degree) and it would be largely vocational in nature. They would then be authorised to deal with/prescribe for minor ailments at the GP surgery and hospital.
    You are literally describing the direction the NHS has taken, and is going to take with the huge doctor's shortage, with nurse practitioners, prescribing pharmacists, etc.
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    If you want to utilise doctors' time more efficiently, I would start by getting rid of the time-consuming non-doctor-specific tasks they are required to do, rather than distributing the more skilled aspects of their job (prescribing).

    Any other country would laugh at the fact that we require a doctor to take blood and put in cannulas, something anyone could do with half an hour training and a bit of practice. Also, when seeing a patient in hospital, most of the time is not spent with the patient, but in the office doing paperwork, writing drug charts, doing risk assessments and re-writing clerkings to a different proforma rather than adding to a universal proforma.

    We do have physician associates and nurse practitioners, but instead of assisting with the above, it seems their mandate is to cherry pick the best aspects of medicine (learning advanced procedures, clerking patients, spending time in theatre) while they are "not allowed" to write up regular medication or write discharge letters which utterly defeats the point.
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    (Original post by Etomidate)
    If you want to utilise doctors' time more efficiently, I would start by getting rid of the time-consuming non-doctor-specific tasks they are required to do, rather than distributing the more skilled aspects of their job (prescribing).

    Any other country would laugh at the fact that we require a doctor to take blood and put in cannulas, something anyone could do with half an hour training and a bit of practice. Also, when seeing a patient in hospital, most of the time is not spent with the patient, but in the office doing paperwork, writing drug charts, doing risk assessments and re-writing clerkings to a different proforma rather than adding to a universal proforma.

    We do have physician associates and nurse practitioners, but instead of assisting with the above, it seems their mandate is to cherry pick the best aspects of medicine (learning advanced procedures, clerking patients, spending time in theatre) while they are "not allowed" to write up regular medication or write discharge letters which utterly defeats the point.
    This is a good post. The notion that the doctors have to spend hours doing all the blood tests for the ward in the morning, or manually require long drug charts :facepalm:
 
 
 
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