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Is it just me or are social interactions at grammar schools far more hierarchical? Watch

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    I remember going to a grammar school for just one day for a maths week thing lol.

    The students of the grammar were nice but like literally robots. I felt there was nooo life.

    Although I loved the whole building and the way it is set out etc.

    That day I realised how much I missed my school, even the teachers were like can not wait to go back.
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Mine wasn't single-sex. I would never have agreed to attend a single-sex school :nope:
    I thought all grammar schools were one sex
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I remember going to a grammar school for just one day for a maths week thing lol.

    The students of the grammar were nice but like literally robots. I felt there was nooo life.

    Although I loved the whole building and the way it is set out etc.

    That day I realised how much I missed my school, even the teachers were like can not wait to go back.
    I wasn't aware we were robots
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I thought all grammar schools were one sex
    Nope. It depends on the borough. That does explain why you think the social culture is different though :yes:
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    (Original post by ByronicHero)
    Nope. It depends on the borough. That does explain why you think the social culture is different though :yes:
    We have girls in sixth form. I am at the end of sixth form atm, and I still think the culture is a bit different.

    Sixth form is way more chill than lower year.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    There are literally entrance exams you have to pass to get in. I only know one person who got in while failing, and that was because his home was very unstable.

    If anything you sound touchy on this issue.
    I don't need to be touchy, there weren't any grammars near me and I went to an RG.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I have gone to a grammar school for my secondary education, and I seem to think of things far different from a lot of people who post on here and those who have gone to comprehensive.

    I think of things in a much more hierarchical and political way than those who I have talked to about their times at secondary school, it seems to me a lot more rigid in comparison to comprehensive.

    Is that true or am I simply looking at this in a more cyncial way than most people?
    Hello,

    I went to an all girls grammar school from year 7 to year 9, before moving to a non-selective school for year 10 and 11. My reasons may interest you - it was solely because of the horrendous social environment of the grammar school itself.

    The students believed, and still do (we are currently in year 12) that they are 'better' in may respects to students from other schools; they would often insult the students of local schools that were not grammar schools.

    Whilst the grammar I attended was state, a lot of the students had been from local private schools (especially in my class - in fact, the majority did - I did not). These students tended to stick together and exclude those of us that had not had the privilege of being trained through the entrance exams.

    Honestly, it was a poisonous environment. They were exclusive, vile children and have grown up to be equally as pretentious teenagers. It was only upon moving to the non-selective did I truly realise the extent of the disgusting attitudes of the students and teachers there, as well as the view of being on a higher level to those students at non-grammar schools. Which is hilarious, because I know many people at the school I transferred to achieved much higher grades than those at the grammar school.

    If I could do it all again, I wouldn't attend the grammar school. The level of rigidity and honest belief that they have achieved something oh so amazing by attending a grammar school is almost sickening. It took me a while to leave everything that happened to me there in the past and move on with my life, and the comprehensive school was excellent socially - they were inclusive, kind, friendly and supportive of one another. A stark, stark difference.
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    (Original post by celloel)
    Hello,

    I went to an all girls grammar school from year 7 to year 9, before moving to a non-selective school for year 10 and 11. My reasons may interest you - it was solely because of the horrendous social environment of the grammar school itself.

    The students believed, and still do (we are currently in year 12) that they are 'better' in may respects to students from other schools; they would often insult the students of local schools that were not grammar schools.

    Whilst the grammar I attended was state, a lot of the students had been from local private schools (especially in my class - in fact, the majority did - I did not). These students tended to stick together and exclude those of us that had not had the privilege of being trained through the entrance exams.

    Honestly, it was a poisonous environment. They were exclusive, vile children and have grown up to be equally as pretentious teenagers. It was only upon moving to the non-selective did I truly realise the extent of the disgusting attitudes of the students and teachers there, as well as the view of being on a higher level to those students at non-grammar schools. Which is hilarious, because I know many people at the school I transferred to achieved much higher grades than those at the grammar school.

    If I could do it all again, I wouldn't attend the grammar school. The level of rigidity and honest belief that they have achieved something oh so amazing by attending a grammar school is almost sickening. It took me a while to leave everything that happened to me there in the past and move on with my life, and the comprehensive school was excellent socially - they were inclusive, kind, friendly and supportive of one another. A stark, stark difference.
    Thank god I am not the only person who feels this way. I just hope I haven't become pretentious or anything.
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    (Original post by Maker)
    I don't need to be touchy, there weren't any grammars near me and I went to an RG.
    Then why accuse me of being like that when I was clarifying something, even if it was in an admittedly frank way?
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    Thank god I am not the only person who feels this way. I just hope I haven't become pretentious or anything.
    I didn't even realise until I went to the non-selective that I had, although to a small extent, become a bit pretentious, after it being encouraged for 3 years. I'd like to say that's changed now though! :laugh:

    I'd also like to throw in that I now go to a college, and I've noticed the students that transferred from grammar schools (and those from private schools), although there aren't many, tend to stick in little groups together (at least in my classes), which could be of interest.
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    (Original post by celloel)
    I didn't even realise until I went to the non-selective that I had, although to a small extent, become a bit pretentious, after it being encouraged for 3 years. I'd like to say that's changed now though! :laugh:

    I'd also like to throw in that I now go to a college, and I've noticed the students that transferred from grammar schools (and those from private schools), although there aren't many, tend to stick in little groups together (at least in my classes), which could be of interest.
    I know I can be a little arrogant too, even when I don't intend to. Hopefully uni will make me a bit better.

    I guess it makes sense now why I am in a smaller group then, since the majority of the people there went to private or were raised by very rich parents. I have always been one of the nerds, and most of my friends have been far from pretentious. I just hope I am not completely insufferable on the outside, since I am avoided by many people inside the school for whatever reason, but it isn't like I am totally friendless.

    I also became aware a few weeks ago that I was an outcast from the main group without being aware of it, because my friend who now goes to college made me aware of it. How funny.
    • #2
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    I have to say going to an all girls grammar school a lot of people were actually scared of the comprehensive that backed on to our field. I remember being a form rep in y7 and in our meeting of form reps from each year we shared stories of how we were afraid of that school's pupils and how one of the girl's brother was attacked by someone from that school with a craft knife. I find sometimes find it difficult to interact with people who don't go to grammars as what you talk about is completely different. Like last week I was randomly walking behind people in school and they were debating he merits of a treaty in Maastricht whereas conversations I've had with people from comprehensives are completely different. I'm not trying to insult anyone I just wanted to share my experiences sorry if I have offended anyone
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    I disagree. And I went to an all girls grammar school. I now go to mixed sixth form college and it isn't so different. Main differences are there are less very intelligent people and also less *****y girls (also no crazy 11 year olds).
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I have gone to a grammar school for my secondary education, and I seem to think of things far different from a lot of people who post on here and those who have gone to comprehensive.

    I think of things in a much more hierarchical and political way than those who I have talked to about their times at secondary school, it seems to me a lot more rigid in comparison to comprehensive.

    Is that true or am I simply looking at this in a more cyncial way than most people?
    Could you maybe expand on this a little more? I go to a grammar school and I'm honestly not certain what you're getting at atm..
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    (Original post by Retired_Messiah)
    Could you maybe expand on this a little more? I go to a grammar school and I'm honestly not certain what you're getting at atm..
    I want to know if social interaction is any different between the different types of schools.
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    Depends. I currently attend one of the many grammar schools in Southend, and being in Essex and not hugely bourgeois lol, there's honestly little elitism whatsoever. The schools attracts a lot of people from East London and nearby areas, and not many people are loaded, the majority are decidedly middle class, but the amount of working class people outweighs the amount of richer people easily, I know few "posh" people. The years 7 and 8 in our school are the first years where there's actually a non-white majority. Honestly grammar schools in the right area a great thing. Our school is elitist in we think we are better than state schools, but that's because we consistently perform well nationally. The only difference I've noticed is that there are way more smart people (obviously), and the same stereotypes in comprehensives, same sorts of people, nerds, sporty people, "cool kids" etc, a lot more of them take pride in their grades. It's only the bottom 30 or so who care little about school and don't do that well, but to some extent, everyone has a pretty alright work ethic. But yeah, I honestly depends it is dependent on where your grammar school is.
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    (Original post by TercioOfParma)
    I want to know if social interaction is any different between the different types of schools.
    Having been to no other schools I couldn't really say. People from the local comprehensive down the road from us seem to have no trouble getting on with students from our lot though so I'd guess the differences aren't extreme.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    I have to say going to an all girls grammar school a lot of people were actually scared of the comprehensive that backed on to our field. I remember being a form rep in y7 and in our meeting of form reps from each year we shared stories of how we were afraid of that school's pupils and how one of the girl's brother was attacked by someone from that school with a craft knife. I find sometimes find it difficult to interact with people who don't go to grammars as what you talk about is completely different. Like last week I was randomly walking behind people in school and they were debating he merits of a treaty in Maastricht whereas conversations I've had with people from comprehensives are completely different. I'm not trying to insult anyone I just wanted to share my experiences sorry if I have offended anyone
    I think the comp had Morlocks and they hunted down the Elois from the grammar and ate them raw.
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    Grammar schools are practically postcode lottery, and do the opposite of social mobility.

    That said, I wouldn't have minded going to one if there was one around in my town. But alas, my town is too deprived to have a grammar school. We can't have grammar schools to help the poorest now can we?

    Not that having a bog standard state comp education prevented me from aiming for the very top university in the country
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    (Original post by Serine Soul)
    Grammar schools are practically postcode lottery, and do the opposite of social mobility.

    That said, I wouldn't have minded going to one if there was one around in my town. But alas, my town is too deprived to have a grammar school. We can't have grammar schools to help the poorest now can we?

    Not that having a bog standard state comp education prevented me from aiming for the very top university in the country
    To be fair, they used to be a country wide thing, and a lot of the counties withdrew them and now only a few remain

    Great job for succeeding though
 
 
 
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