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Losing patience with some mental illness Watch

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    You're losing patients! With some mental illness! This sounds like Southern Health trust! Well, where are they? They must be somewhere. You need to go and find them.
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    Yes thank you, I studied both so I'm aware of the differences 🙄 Is there any mental health professional that isn't less than the grand title of psych UG? Not that I need to defend counselling training but it does include many of the studies you have learnt, the biological side for medications and it can include the neuroscience element. It might not be a science but it's not less than.

    And because of studying both I am aware of the weakness that exists in the UG programme without looking at the application of what we learn and also without personal development. It's no use waiting until dclinpsy because the majority of applicants do not go to that level to work in mental health. Many people use the degree as a stepping stone into frontline mental health roles so really it's a failing on the university's part to not prepare people for that. Including looking at prejudice and discrimination. The course itself might not be vocational but it leads directly into a particular type of role so it should start to look at working with that.
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    Also, aren't scientists and academics supposed to learn the skills to apply theory to practice?? Meaning your point about how they are different is really invalid.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    Also, aren't scientists and academics supposed to learn the skills to apply theory to practice?? Meaning your point about how they are different is really invalid.
    You clearly don't know what a degree in psychology entails.
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    Right because only you know. And you know better than people who actually work in mental health..because you've studied the science of psychology for 3 years.
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    You clearly don't know what a degree in psychology entails.
    She said that she has studied one. So I'm sure she would know what it entails.
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    (Original post by bullettheory)
    She said that she has studied one. So I'm sure she would know what it entails.
    When did she say she has a degree in psychology? And where for that matter?
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    When did she say she has a degree in psychology? And where for that matter?
    She said above that she has studied both - I'm guessing one is psychology. Regardless, linking theory to practice is a vital skill.
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    (Original post by bullettheory)
    She said above that she has studied both - I'm guessing one is psychology. Regardless, linking theory to practice is a vital skill.
    So you took that to mean she has a degree in psychology? Yes it's a vital skill for those who want to go into clinical practice. But suggesting that a psychology degree should have more personal development content for clinical practice is akin to suggesting that a degree in biochemistry should have more content in patient care.
    A degree in psychology is theoretical, you learn to conduct research, not to work with patients :rolleyes:
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    (Original post by Anonymous)
    So you took that to mean she has a degree in psychology? Yes it's a vital skill for those who want to go into clinical practice. But suggesting that a psychology degree should have more personal development content for clinical practice is akin to suggesting that a degree in biochemistry should have more content in patient care.
    A degree in psychology is theoretical, you learn to conduct research, not to work with patients :rolleyes:
    That's what I gathered, may be wrong.

    If you have no formal teaching in how to work with service users, don't you think that it would be beneficial to listen to those who have had that teaching and experience in working with service users, rather than shut their views down? Plus in vocational degrees, we do academic work too - so we have a basic understand of the core concepts - obviously not as much as someone with a psychology degree, but we all have our own strengths.
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    If you don't have sympathy for people who suffer from anxiety and depression (which are quite commonly diagnosed in mental health), who do you have sympathy for?
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    Rather than working with more trivial mental health problems, you'd be better off in a psychiatric unit or similar where your exposed only to advanced illnesses. I share the sentiment that working with people that want to help themselves is an important part of treatment. Engage with what you enjoy treating and learning about, or your lack of empathy may show to patients.


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    The whole point of academic skill is to learn critical thinking which includes the application of theory to practice. By that I don't necessarily mean clinical practice. In psychology, more than many degrees, this is true because the research you're learning about is a two-way link between the applying theory to reality and reality creating theory. It's not a coincidence that many people believe that psychology is a science of common sense..and why they don't always see it as a real science.

    I don't have a degree in psychology, I'm an undergrad. I had to put pause to it so I could complete my foundation degree in counselling. But I have many years of experience in working with mental health and trauma. Including being at the forefront of one of the fields I work in.

    You can have all the judgemental views you want if you plan to stick to research but if you plan on working with people in a support capacity, you need to climb down off your high horse and admit you don't know everything.
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    (Original post by PsychoD)
    Rather than working with more trivial mental health problems, you'd be better off in a psychiatric unit or similar where your exposed only to advanced illnesses. I share the sentiment that working with people that want to help themselves is an important part of treatment. Engage with what you enjoy treating and learning about, or your lack of empathy may show to patients.


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    I agree that there's no therapeutic value to working with people that don't want to be helped. But I think there's a large margin between "I don't have anything wrong with me so I don't need help" and "please help" - but that person struggling to make changes. They are worlds apart
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    The whole point of academic skill is to learn critical thinking which includes the application of theory to practice. By that I don't necessarily mean clinical practice. In psychology, more than many degrees, this is true because the research you're learning about is a two-way link between the applying theory to reality and reality creating theory. It's not a coincidence that many people believe that psychology is a science of common sense..and why they don't always see it as a real science.

    I don't have a degree in psychology, I'm an undergrad. I had to put pause to it so I could complete my foundation degree in counselling. But I have many years of experience in working with mental health and trauma. Including being at the forefront of one of the fields I work in.

    You can have all the judgemental views you want if you plan to stick to research but if you plan on working with people in a support capacity, you need to climb down off your high horse and admit you don't know everything.
    Applying theory to reality and reality to theory? That's the scientific method in general? That's not specific to psychology at all? The reason people think Psychlogy is common sense, and the reason why it's not considered a real science by some is due to two entirely different things. You aren't making any sense here, I'm sorry.
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    (Original post by PsychoD)
    Rather than working with more trivial mental health problems, you'd be better off in a psychiatric unit or similar where your exposed only to advanced illnesses. I share the sentiment that working with people that want to help themselves is an important part of treatment. Engage with what you enjoy treating and learning about, or your lack of empathy may show to patients.


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    I know, I think I've realised that recently.

    In the past I've worked with people with severe autism who had to deal with a whole range of mental illnesses alongside the challenges of severe autism, including psychosis. And it was so challenging, but I absolutely loved it. I think I would ideally work along that sort of lines.
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    (Original post by ~Tara~)
    I agree that there's no therapeutic value to working with people that don't want to be helped. But I think there's a large margin between "I don't have anything wrong with me so I don't need help" and "please help" - but that person struggling to make changes. They are worlds apart

    ...


    Why did you assume I was referring to the latter and not the former then???

    The entire point of my thread was that some people who experience mild mental health issues do not put any effort into getting better. And I specifically said the sub-clinical individuals who have the perfect capacity to put the required effort in but still chose not to?
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    im not sure how you validating my point that you should know how to apply theory really means that I'm the confused/confusing one.

    And just to throw it in..you can get a Bsc in counselling. So basically you've now proven none of your arguments have any standing at all. I'm sure this will be a confusing time for you too.
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    The first thing I can say is you can't judge until you've been in their shoes.

    Secondly, on a different note, a lot of people cling to their illnesses as they have had them so long that it's hard to lose such a huge part of your identity. Depression was the main part of what made me, 'me', as a teenager, and so when I started to recover I had no idea who I really was and therefore relapsed. So, when you say people 'cling' to their illnesses, that may be a small way towards explaining why.
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    (Original post by Airmed)
    If you don't have sympathy for people who suffer from anxiety and depression (which are quite commonly diagnosed in mental health), who do you have sympathy for?
    Never said I had no sympathy for those with depression and anxiety?
 
 
 
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