Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
x Turn on thread page Beta

Ok so the kids are approaching (have started) their GCSE's watch

    Offline

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I know right I wasn't allowed to do higher science dispite getting 80%-100% in all my in class tests from year 7-9 and then continuing in years 10 -11 the head of science even said to me in year 8 i could probably take and pass the science GCSE and pass that year (although not actually do it i had to wait until i did my GCSE)
    Well that is just ridiculous. The teaching was awful at my school and they were very unsupportive and they certainly put a cap on what you could achieve.

    I'm glad I went through that in my younger years because it made me realise you cannot just slide through life with people supporting you all the way, you have to prove your potential.

    But having one exam would be much fairer in my opinion, I'm completely with you on that!
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    x
    I don't know if this is a good idea. A lot of students can't pass the higher exams, hence why they do foundation exams.
    Example:
    A girl in my Year 9 class, when we were moving into Year 10, was being put in the foundation class. She insisted she didn't want to and could do it & was borderline, so with encouragement from her parents they put her in the higher tier class.

    For those two years she struggled - and I mean struggled. She didn't pass her maths GCSE and would have to resit a foundation tier maths exam this year (we're in year 12). If she'd sat the foundation exam, she would have passed.

    I think having two tiers benefits those students that just don't understand the basics of higher tier like Pythagoras theorem, trig, etc (we get taught them way before GCSE for the first time, along with most other things - and I've been to two average state secondary schools; same thing in both places). It allows them to achieve that all important C grade without struggling through stuff they just don't understand.

    Having one tier would disadvantage a lot students that simply wouldn't get a passing grade in Higher tier.
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by celloel)
    I don't know if this is a good idea. A lot of students can't pass the higher exams, hence why they do foundation exams.
    Example:
    A girl in my Year 9 class, when we were moving into Year 10, was being put in the foundation class. She insisted she didn't want to and could do it & was borderline, so with encouragement from her parents they put her in the higher tier class.

    For those two years she struggled - and I mean struggled. She didn't pass her maths GCSE and would have to resit a foundation tier maths exam this year (we're in year 12). If she'd sat the foundation exam, she would have passed.

    I think having two tiers benefits those students that just don't understand the basics of higher tier like Pythagoras theorem, trig, etc (we get taught them way before GCSE for the first time, along with most other things - and I've been to two average state secondary schools; same thing in both places). It allows them to achieve that all important C grade without struggling through stuff they just don't understand.

    Having one tier would disadvantage a lot students that simply wouldn't get a passing grade in Higher tier.
    I'm not saying have just higher tier questions I'm just saying have questions from across the whole thing.

    So you have at the start things like long multiplication and end up with i don't know what the syllabus is but lets say simultaneous equations or basic calculus (because it's GCSE).
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    I'm not saying have just higher tier questions I'm just saying have questions from across the whole thing.

    So you have at the start things like long multiplication and end up with i don't know what the syllabus is but lets say simultaneous equations or basic calculus (because it's GCSE).
    But do you think that some students, when sat in the class find it really hard to learn the top higher content, might become disenchanted and think they can't pass? A few students in my class got like that, and they were doing higher!

    Because there would be so many students sitting the same exam, the grade boundaries would be skewed - in favour of 'ex' higher tier (they're able to do the easier questions, earning more marks, whilst the foundation tier students would be unlikely to do the harder questions). I feel like this system really could lead to a lot of students not getting a C grade.

    I think our system works - it provides everyone with a chance of passing their GCSEs, when some may not have otherwise with higher tier exams.
    (In relation to someone else, A Level exams aren't tiered because the fact you're taking it at A Level is enough evidence that you're comfortable with the subject).
    • Thread Starter
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by celloel)
    But do you think that some students, when sat in the class find it really hard to learn the top higher content, might become disenchanted and think they can't pass? A few students in my class got like that, and they were doing higher!

    Because there would be so many students sitting the same exam, the grade boundaries would be skewed - in favour of 'ex' higher tier (they're able to do the easier questions, earning more marks, whilst the foundation tier students would be unlikely to do the harder questions). I feel like this system really could lead to a lot of students not getting a C grade.

    I think our system works - it provides everyone with a chance of passing their GCSEs, when some may not have otherwise with higher tier exams.
    (In relation to someone else, A Level exams aren't tiered because the fact you're taking it at A Level is enough evidence that you're comfortable with the subject).
    the grade bounders would change instead of being worked out on a curve it would be static like in a university so 40% is a pass (or D in this case) 50% is a 2:2 (C) 60% is a 2:1(B) and 70+ is a first (A) works ok in uni why not at GCSE.
    Offline

    19
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    the grade bounders would change instead of being worked out on a curve it would be static like in a university so 40% is a pass (or D in this case) 50% is a 2:2 (C) 60% is a 2:1(B) and 70+ is a first (A) works ok in uni why not at GCSE.
    Because that'd be an incredibly unfair system. It's worked out on a curve because year by year the exam difficulty changes - it gets harder/easier and they need to account for that fact. Otherwise an 'A' in 2016, for example, could be as good as getting a 'B' in 2017 - depending on the difference in difficulty. Hence the grade boundaries shifting year on year.

    It's less applicable at University.
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    In the USA (California) you take Pre-Algebra in 8th grade (since 2002 or so 7th grade 12 to13 years old) has some Geometry and some Statistics & Probability, Algebra I 9th grade (since 2002 or so 8th grade 13-14 years old) has some more Geometry, basic Trigonometry, and some more Statistics & Probability, Geometry (since 2002 or so 10th grade 14-15 years old) has some Trigonometry and Statistics & Probability, 11th grade Algebra II (since 2002 or so 11th grade 15-16 years old Pre Calculus) prior to about 2002 has some Trigonometry and Statistics & Probability.
    All pupils/students on the University/College track have to take those math courses. In this area of California an A grade is 90-100, B grade is 80-89,C grade 70-79,D grade 60-69 and F/Fail grade 0-59.You have to retake the course if you get a D/F.
    That would be like having a GCSE that has some foundation tier questions some intermediate tier course questions and some Higher tier questions.
    When there are three tiers
    Foundation tier exams:
    These would be 3 hours of questions(1.5h of Foundation questions,45min Intermedate tier questions and 45mins of higher teir questions.
    Intermediate tier:
    These would also be 3 hours of questions (1hour of questions at each tier.)
    Higher Tier:
    2 hours and 30min of higher tier questions and 30mins of questions in the other tiers.
    When there are two tiers
    Foundation tier: These would also be 3 hours of questions
    3h of exam questions(2 hours 15mins Foundation questions and 45min of higher tier questions.)
    Higher tier:
    3h of exam questions(2 hours 15mins Higher tier questions and 45min of Foundation tier questions.)
    What do you think of this?
    Offline

    15
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jonathanemptage)
    Why can't all kids get taught the same thing and be given the opportunity to get good grades it would mean a longer (2 - 2.5 hour exam) but it seems like a much fairer system to me.
    British society is unhealthy obsessed with class, with poor social mobility. Child born to a workers' family will most likely be a worker; segregating students into the dumber ("foundation") and brighter categories just will cut their aspirations, so they would not dream about better life achieved, amongst other means, by better education.
    (Original post by offhegoes)
    Because it would cost a stupid amount of money to mark. A ridiculous amount of money.
    It wouldn't be that much. Actually, I believe it would be even easier as there would be no misunderstandings if that is a foundation or higher level.It would also make logistics much easier.
    (Original post by fatima1998)
    first of all, they arent kids they are teenagers2nd of all, what if a student find circle theorems and dunno the basis of circlesif the student doesnt know the foundation level of the subject then they cannot do the higher level, it can be very difficult to catchup with foundation and higher level at the same time
    How long does the kids prepare for the GCSE? There is more than enough time to revise both foundation materials (which isn't really be a problem for teenagers, half of it is a primary school material) and higher level.
    (Original post by Donkey******)
    Why have a G grade student sit for 2 1/2 hours when they'll likely only answer the first 2 questions correctly?
    There should be more than 2 tbh
    (Original post by Donkey******)
    It would mean people at the lower end getting slightly inflated grades because they've got longer to struggle through the questions,
    if they don't know, they don't know.
    (Original post by Donkey******)
    and potentially stronger candidates losing marks because they've had to waste time with basic addition questions, which is potentially a source of unnecessary errors.
    if they make mistakes in "basic" questions, they are not really the stronger candidates.
 
 
 
Poll
Do you agree with the proposed ban on plastic straws and cotton buds?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Write a reply...
Reply
Hide
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.