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Bench press - How fast should I see improvements? Watch

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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    As I explained above, I intentionally did not state my workout. I am currently, while not doing the entire program, doing a shortened version of the one I started with from 0 which included alternating highrep/lowweight to lowrep/high weight. Back then I was making regular progress, although with the bench press it was also then not as quick as with other muscle groups.

    My goal is not to look like a skinny wuss. More or less. And yes, that excludes legs, because, no offense if you have them, I actually think big legs are repulsive. And yes, that might make me prone to looking like a lopsided idiot, but since I do not even intend to get that big up top, that will not be a problem.
    Should be repping 2 plates by next week mate.
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    (Original post by mrhedgehog)
    Should be repping 2 plates by next week mate.
    Two plates of sushi?
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    As I explained above, I intentionally did not state my workout. I am currently, while not doing the entire program, doing a shortened version of the one I started with from 0 which included alternating highrep/lowweight to lowrep/high weight. Back then I was making regular progress, although with the bench press it was also then not as quick as with other muscle groups.

    My goal is not to look like a skinny wuss. More or less. And yes, that excludes legs, because, no offense if you have them, I actually think big legs are repulsive. And yes, that might make me prone to looking like a lopsided idiot, but since I do not even intend to get that big up top, that will not be a problem.
    Well, pretty much as I said above, bench press is one of the first exercises to suffer if your programming is poor. Back muscles, arms etc. tend not to suffer as much from overlap, particularly if you're not training legs. Even then, as I also said, as a beginner you can really get away with a lot, but as time goes on a poor programme will seriously hinder your progress.

    No offense taken, if anyone has ever been genuinely repulsed by my muscularity then I know what I'm doing is working :lol: But isn't the whole point of training to build muscle to build a balanced, well-rounded physique? If you don't plan on getting very big up top then you don't need to get big legs either, but you'd still be best training them to get a little bigger like you are with your upper body. The result will be that the first thing people notice about you will be how skinny your legs look otherwise.

    We've all been there btw - we've all said "I don't want to get very big" when we first started. Come a couple of years down the line, you'll be kicking yourself for not training legs for the last couple of years
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    Two plates of sushi?
    Well that could work too
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    Doing the same workout every day is not conducive to good progression. Not following some sort of routine with a defined rate of progression is also not conducive to good progression.

    Also, you should really only up the weight in 2.5kg increments. 5kg is a pretty big jump when you're only pressing 45kg. That, of course, would be clear if you followed a good established programme.

    Of course it's your choice. If you keep doing what you're doing you might be able to press 50kg in a few weeks. Who knows? :iiam:
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Well, pretty much as I said above, bench press is one of the first exercises to suffer if your programming is poor. Back muscles, arms etc. tend not to suffer as much from overlap, particularly if you're not training legs. Even then, as I also said, as a beginner you can really get away with a lot, but as time goes on a poor programme will seriously hinder your progress.

    No offense taken, if anyone has ever been genuinely repulsed by my muscularity then I know what I'm doing is working :lol: But isn't the whole point of training to build muscle to build a balanced, well-rounded physique? If you don't plan on getting very big up top then you don't need to get big legs either, but you'd still be best training them to get a little bigger like you are with your upper body. The result will be that the first thing people notice about you will be how skinny your legs look otherwise.

    We've all been there btw - we've all said "I don't want to get very big" when we first started. Come a couple of years down the line, you'll be kicking yourself for not training legs for the last couple of years
    If you had said that in the first reply, this thread would have been so lovely.

    And yes, I do appreciate big legs, as in I can see a lot of hard work has gone into them. It's just, I don't know why, but I find the yuck. Same with traps. Looks unnatural in my eyes I guess. Or something.

    And no, I am a cyclists, getting huge would not work. When I get to the point where I feel that I have a good body, and my arms are nice (I mainly started because when I stood sideways in a mirror my arms, and delts and especially the area between tricep and delts, looks so freaking skinny man, I was like nah, you gotta do something) then I will cut down til I find a routine that allows me to maintain the physique, but won't keep pushing.
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    In terms of the weight I can lift.

    I am currently doing reps of 45kg on the bench press. Should I expect to do say 50kg in 2 weeks time? Or 4 weeks time?

    I am asking because I feel like while I can do one more on the same weight fairly quickly or then two more, but putting on more weight seems quite a step up every time.

    Also, in other exercises, I feel % wise my improvements have been much faster so far, e.g. barbell curl I can almost do the same number of reps with current weight than with the weight I started with, which was 25% less.
    Assuming you're new to the weight lifting game have you heard of 5x5 stronglifts routine? it's ideal for someone like yourself looking to build a good base
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    (Original post by RandomBadgerinoo)
    Assuming you're new to the weight lifting game have you heard of 5x5 stronglifts routine? it's ideal for someone like yourself looking to build a good base
    I actually incorporate 4 of the 5 into my routine already. Though MKC has got me thinking if I should not add the squats back in, too.
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    I actually incorporate 4 of the 5 into my routine already. Though MKC has got me thinking if I should not add the squats back in, too.

    Compound lifts will help you gain size, isolation lifts will help build singular muscle groups with definition IE Biceps and Triceps, Squats and Deadlifts should be essential to any lifting programme, also try to consume 3000 calories per day but use the scale of 40% protein 40% fat and 20% carbs
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    If you had said that in the first reply, this thread would have been so lovely.

    And yes, I do appreciate big legs, as in I can see a lot of hard work has gone into them. It's just, I don't know why, but I find the yuck. Same with traps. Looks unnatural in my eyes I guess. Or something.

    And no, I am a cyclists, getting huge would not work. When I get to the point where I feel that I have a good body, and my arms are nice (I mainly started because when I stood sideways in a mirror my arms, and delts and especially the area between tricep and delts, looks so freaking skinny man, I was like nah, you gotta do something) then I will cut down til I find a routine that allows me to maintain the physique, but won't keep pushing.
    I did say it in my first reply, but I said the "big legs" part first and you probably stopped reading there :lol:

    Well, either way round, I'd still recommend training the entire body for the best result. A balanced physique is an aesthetically pleasing one
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    I did say it in my first reply, but I said the "big legs" part first and you probably stopped reading there :lol:

    Well, either way round, I'd still recommend training the entire body for the best result. A balanced physique is an aesthetically pleasing one

    I don't think big legs are necessarily hard to build, i find its the easiest part of my body to train for size, i seem to struggle around my forearms, but we're all different haha!
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    This may not be the advice your looking for but i find i get some of the best improvements if, after a bench/dumbell press, i do pressups with weights on my back.
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    (Original post by RandomBadgerinoo)
    I don't think big legs are necessarily hard to build, i find its the easiest part of my body to train for size, i seem to struggle around my forearms, but we're all different haha!
    Mine is arms haha, though my legs are responsive but I've not been able to train them very consistently due to lifelong knee problems, so they're not as well developed as they could be.
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    (Original post by XOR_)
    This may not be the advice your looking for but i find i get some of the best improvements if, after a bench/dumbell press, i do pressups with weights on my back.
    How?! My arms are like jelly after i do chest, i do them before i start my weight training on chest
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    (Original post by WoodyMKC)
    Mine is arms haha, though my legs are responsive but I've not been able to train them very consistently due to lifelong knee problems, so they're not as well developed as they could be.

    Genetics are a ***** :console:
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    (Original post by XOR_)
    This may not be the advice your looking for but i find i get some of the best improvements if, after a bench/dumbell press, i do pressups with weights on my back.
    I've added weighted pushups back into my routine recently as they've helped my chest development in the past, way underrated IMO. Though I have heavy and light days and I use them on my light days, several straight sets for highish reps with short rests between sets.
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    (Original post by RandomBadgerinoo)
    Genetics are a ***** :console:
    I meant arms are my most responsive btw haha. I think my back width is something that's come along pretty slowly and coincidentally I struggle to make gains on chins, getting there though. My forearms used to suck but using a Vicelike hand gripper has seen them come leaps and bounds. 300+ lbs of resistance on that bad boy
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    (Original post by brainhuman)
    I actually incorporate 4 of the 5 into my routine already. Though MKC has got me thinking if I should not add the squats back in, too.
    With regards to squats - they are the most difficult and most gruesome of the compound lifts. People who do squats generally get a higher "high" after the gym and it also releases more growth hormone than other exercises. This, of course, leads to more muscle growth. So squats, while making you a much more well rounded gym go-er, also help your other lifts.
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    (Original post by tomtjl)
    With regards to squats - they are the most difficult and most gruesome of the compound lifts. People who do squats generally get a higher "high" after the gym and it also releases more growth hormone than other exercises. This, of course, leads to more muscle growth. So squats, while making you a much more well rounded gym go-er, also help your other lifts.
    Mind if I ask you a quick question?

    If not, I'm now 16 currently at sixth form. I have never attended Gym consistently and only did so occasionally with a few of my friends from school, which was in Year 9/10. Back then, I was able to bench press about 5 reps with 30kg on each side of the bar. Now I attended gym last week for the first time in ages, and was unable to do more than 5 reps of 10kg on each side. At first, I thought it would take a few days to get used to it again, but this has not been the case... I tried again and was only able to comfortably lift 10 reps of 5kg on each side of the bar...

    WTF is happening to my body??
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    (Original post by LelouchViRuge)
    Mind if I ask you a quick question?

    If not, I'm now 16 currently at sixth form. I have never attended Gym consistently and only did so occasionally with a few of my friends from school, which was in Year 9/10. Back then, I was able to bench press about 5 reps with 30kg on each side of the bar. Now I attended gym last week for the first time in ages, and was unable to do more than 5 reps of 10kg on each side. At first, I thought it would take a few days to get used to it again, but this has not been the case... I tried again and was only able to comfortably lift 10 reps of 5kg on each side of the bar...

    WTF is happening to my body??

    Do you do the reps correctly? Never try too jump on to the highest weight you can do with a one rep max, always build up with 8 reps as a warm up, and if you're looking to hit a one rep max, do one rep on each weight as it progresses up

    If you're after strength gains with a squat find out what your one rep max is, and then do 30kg less than what that one rep max is

    IE If you get a one rep max of say 50kg, your progressive build would be 30kg
 
 
 
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