Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    http://uk.businessinsider.com/highes...te-jobs-2015-7

    About 40k average. With degrees from some unis you could be earning that much upon graduation.
    I have no idea where they got these statistics from but these are completely false. Even at Imperial, which has some of the highest graduate salaries of any University in the UK, the average graduate salary for Computer Science/Computing isn't that high. Computer Science actually has one of the highest unemployment rates out of STEM courses at university.

    You need to be very, very good at Maths to do Computer Science at university. It really frustrates me how many people applying for Computer Science don't understand what the subject actually is.
    Offline

    12
    ReputationRep:
    Hi
    My son is doing computer science at Northumbria in Newcastle - he only has a C in maths - also at Derby and Coventry you only needed a C last year - I think Bournemouth or Brighton (definitely one of those two ) only needed a C last year as well- did you do the maths module in your BTEC ? some unis will accept that in lieu of a B in maths - my son wanted to do this but the college wouldn't teach that,preferring to go with the animation module because more students wanted to do that one.Don't listen to anyone who starts to bang on about "ex-poly unis" not being any good for computer science - that's rubbish.
    Offline

    14
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    CS graduates are among the highest paid in the country. What are you smoking to think CS 'isn't that useful'?
    It depends. I've heard they're highly paid but there's also a high rate of unemployment.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JordanL_)
    It depends. I've heard they're highly paid but there's also a high rate of unemployment.
    The high rate is due to the fact the companies get employees from countries like India and China and get 5-6 people for the price of one.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by JordanL_)
    It depends. I've heard they're highly paid but there's also a high rate of unemployment.
    This is only based on hearsay but I get the impression that this is due to people graduating who can barely program, they've passed via other modules and scraped through the coding modules doing as little as possible.

    Everyone I know who works in IT says there are plenty of jobs to go around.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I have no idea where they got these statistics from but these are completely false. Even at Imperial, which has some of the highest graduate salaries of any University in the UK, the average graduate salary for Computer Science/Computing isn't that high. Computer Science actually has one of the highest unemployment rates out of STEM courses at university.

    You need to be very, very good at Maths to do Computer Science at university. It really frustrates me how many people applying for Computer Science don't understand what the subject actually is.
    (Original post by JordanL_)
    It depends. I've heard they're highly paid but there's also a high rate of unemployment.
    Statistics available at http://university.which.co.uk/imperi...ears-9000-g400

    I agree that a lot of people who want to go into computer science don't understand the maths content, hence my offer includes A*s in maths and further maths. As for the average salary it really is that high, the same statistic was quoted by the head of somethingorother in the open day. I hear Goldman Sachs employs as many imperial cs graduates as they can. I personally know a few imperial alumni who have gone on to do very very very well. The employment rate for imperial's course is 93%, so not something I'm worrying about.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    Statistics available at http://university.which.co.uk/imperi...ears-9000-g400

    I agree that a lot of people who want to go into computer science don't understand the maths content, hence my offer includes A*s in maths and further maths. As for the average salary it really is that high, the same statistic was quoted by the head of somethingorother in the open day. I hear Goldman Sachs employs as many imperial cs graduates as they can. I personally know a few imperial alumni who have gone on to do very very very well. The employment rate for imperial's course is 93%, so not something I'm worrying about.
    The remaining 7% either go into further study or setup their own business or probably realise they are good ay something else i suppose

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iRighteous)
    I really want to do CS but so far every University I have seen is asking for a B in maths, and I only a hold a C. I've always wanted to do CS as well. At the moment am in college (first year) doing BTEC ICT LVL2 in Software develop doing level 3 next year. If i can't do CS due to my C then there is no point of me doing level 3 i suppose...Can anyone like clear things out a little is there a possibility or something

    - Thanks
    Having a C in GCSE maths isnt the end of the world, there are loads of universities that dont require a B you just need to look, probably most of the top 30 will be out of the question, although Reading only require a C i think

    Another option is that as you havent started Level 3 yet that means you have 2 attempts to resit you Maths GCSE, maybe look into that
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    CS isn't that useful, it is too general.
    Its good to have a general undergraduate degree, CS is the best to get in to the industry

    There are so many new 'specialised' degrees like Forensic Computing, Games Development, Computer Graphics etc. etc. These 'specialised' courses sound appealing but the course content is terrible! and no way near the level of CS, at a recent job interview I had they said CS was the gold standard, where as these new degrees were just sub par, CS all the way!
    Online

    17
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Sacred Ground)
    I imagine it's very unlikely to graduate and go into a 40k/year job, whether that be with computer science or any other degree
    I know someone getting 35k for a second year placement
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    You only need a C in GCSE maths for Greenwich, Westminster and Hertfordshire Universities
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    Statistics available at http://university.which.co.uk/imperi...ears-9000-g400
    .
    It's using Unistats (MEng) data from just 25 students... BTW the BEng at Imperial is 33k (also a v low sample size).

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    Statistics available at http://university.which.co.uk/imperi...ears-9000-g400

    I agree that a lot of people who want to go into computer science don't understand the maths content, hence my offer includes A*s in maths and further maths. As for the average salary it really is that high, the same statistic was quoted by the head of somethingorother in the open day. I hear Goldman Sachs employs as many imperial cs graduates as they can. I personally know a few imperial alumni who have gone on to do very very very well. The employment rate for imperial's course is 93%, so not something I'm worrying about.
    You said that the average starting salary for computer science graduates is £40,000. Your (questionable) source, from the university with the highest graduate starting salary in the UK, gives a figure of £38,000. So even for Imperial, what you said was wrong.

    Secondly, this thread wasn't about you. Imperial Computer Science graduates don't have anything to worry about, it's people entering Computer Science with inadequate maths backgrounds that need to be concerned.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    You said that the average starting salary for computer science graduates is £40,000. Your (questionable) source, from the university with the highest graduate starting salary in the UK, gives a figure of £38,000. So even for Imperial, what you said was wrong.

    Secondly, this thread wasn't about you. Imperial Computer Science graduates don't have anything to worry about, it's people entering Computer Science with inadequate maths backgrounds that need to be concerned.
    See my post above. The BEng at Imperial is actually 33k.

    And, indeed...

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    You said that the average starting salary for computer science graduates is £40,000. Your (questionable) source, from the university with the highest graduate starting salary in the UK, gives a figure of £38,000. So even for Imperial, what you said was wrong.

    Secondly, this thread wasn't about you. Imperial Computer Science graduates don't have anything to worry about, it's people entering Computer Science with inadequate maths backgrounds that need to be concerned.
    I said the average salary overall is 'about' 40k (Which is far higher than the 27k average salary), I went on to say that from some unis you could be earning that much upon graduation. Imperial's figure of 38k is definitely in that ball park.

    Secondly, my initial post was concerning the following statement.
    (Original post by Vinny1900)
    CS isn't that useful, it is too general.
    Which is completely incorrect, I wouldn't want OP to get the wrong idea and do a degree in games programming or some other trash. My following posts were regarding the questions put to me by other users.
    • Section Leader
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    Section Leader
    (Original post by Jabberjay_)
    I said the average salary overall is 'about' 40k (Which is far higher than the 27k average salary), I went on to say that from some unis you could be earning that much upon graduation. Imperial's figure of 38k is definitely in that ball park.

    Secondly, my initial post was concerning the following statement.

    Which is completely incorrect, I wouldn't want OP to get the wrong idea and do a degree in games programming or some other trash. My following posts were regarding the questions put to me by other users.
    Again, like-for-like use the 3 year BEng data and then even Imperial is 33k. On a par with 27k especially considering London weighting etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by jneill)
    Again, like-for-like use the 3 year BEng data and then even Imperial is 33k. On a par with 27k especially considering London weighting etc.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Even if you did the BEng and made 33k upon graduation, that's higher than the UK average salary, which is pretty good in my opinion. Especially considering its just a starting salary and that after just a few years you would be earning a lot more.
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Plagioclase)
    I have no idea where they got these statistics from but these are completely false. Even at Imperial, which has some of the highest graduate salaries of any University in the UK, the average graduate salary for Computer Science/Computing isn't that high. Computer Science actually has one of the highest unemployment rates out of STEM courses at university.
    Not at universities with good courses - i.e. where students have a) high average UCAS points achieved on entry [1] or b) universities with courses that employers love to hire from.

    Everyone recycles this same line over and over again, when it's in essence just BS. The statistics take into account poorly designed 'IT' courses, universities with subpar students, and for the most part a severe lack of initiative on students to pick up programming skills in their spare time. Absolutely EVERYONE I know who took the time to solidify their CS theoretical knowledge (i.e. they did well at uni) and cultivate a background in programming has ended up doing very well for themselves.

    Case in point, one of my mates at uni has recently landed a grad software engineer job at Facebook London, his package is ~£65k base salary + 0 - £10k bonus + ~£32k/year in stock grant. This guy spent his time going to hackathons, working on side projects as well as honing in his knowledge of traditional CS concepts like data structures and algorithms in order to pass his interviews.

    Most 'normal' grad employers still pay very well (think £25k+) for software engineers coming in with the right attitude, skillset and ability. The industry, and job sector is one of the fastest growing out of any others out there.

    So no, the degree is a perfectly respectable one with solid prospects for those whom put in the effort to develop their skills outside of uni. The problem is too many people don't, ultimately getting turned down from positions that need to get filled.

    [1] Evidence:


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    20
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Not at universities with good courses - i.e. where students have a) high average UCAS points achieved on entry [1] or b) universities with courses that employers love to hire from.

    Everyone recycles this same line over and over again, when it's in essence just BS. The statistics take into account poorly designed 'IT' courses, universities with subpar students, and for the most part a severe lack of initiative on students to pick up programming skills in their spare time. Absolutely EVERYONE I know who took the time to solidify their CS theoretical knowledge (i.e. they did well at uni) and cultivate a background in programming has ended up doing very well for themselves.

    Case in point, one of my mates at uni has recently landed a grad software engineer job at Facebook London, his package is ~£65k base salary + 0 - £10k bonus + ~£32k/year in stock grant. This guy spent his time going to hackathons, working on side projects as well as honing in his knowledge of traditional CS concepts like data structures and algorithms in order to pass his interviews.

    Most 'normal' grad employers still pay very well (think £25k+) for software engineers coming in with the right attitude, skillset and ability. The industry, and job sector is one of the fastest growing out of any others out there.

    So no, the degree is a perfectly respectable one with solid prospects for those whom put in the effort to develop their skills outside of uni. The problem is too many people don't, ultimately getting turned down from positions that need to get filled.

    [1] Evidence:


    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Where's that data from?

    I'm asking this because I'm genuinely interested, not trying to discredit what you're saying.
    • TSR Support Team
    Online

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by JamesN88)
    Where's that data from?

    I'm asking this because I'm genuinely interested, not trying to discredit what you're saying.
    The HEFCE, the organisation which tracks all of the 'university leaver' data for the country.

    Link to original article: http://blog.hefce.ac.uk/2015/07/08/u...-the-data-say/
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Would you rather give up sugar, or salt?
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.