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    (Original post by jooby92)
    Would u pay £2 to see a gp? Fee only required if u request the appointment and not if its been arranged by the gp eg if they say come back in three weeks for review or for review of chronic conditions.

    Would a £2 charge decrease how often u made an appointment or would it not affect this and u would still have made all the appointmwnts that u have made in the past.
    I have a chronic illness, which causes a lot of flare ups and I get (badly) sick, a lot. You said you wouldn't have to pay for a 'review' of chronic conditions, but that's not the only time I visit the hospital/GP for things related to my illness - as I said I often get badly sick. I also need to change medications a lot, etc etc, so this would be an incredibly unfair system.

    Adding the fact that £2 is about half my hourly wage (when I was able to work)... I'd have to pay it - I go to the doctor because I need to (for antibiotics, medication, hospital referral, hospital visits, whatever else), but it'd be unfair IMO.
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    outrageous. only poshos would agree to this
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    (Original post by Dez)
    We already pay for prescriptions. And hospital parking.
    Yes, but to an extent, those are private ventures and not on the NHS. A little flame can cause a wild fire. I don't think that this idea should be entertained, or else it will be the beginning of the end of the NHS.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    I'm surprised we don't already charge for missed appointments tbh. At one of the hospitals I attend, there's a notice up of how appointments were missed in at least one department last month. (which is a certain amount of hours) But I have been in the situation at least once where I've supposedly missed appointments that weren't made. And then there was that appointment I'd supposedly made which I actually hadn't. I only knew because I'd received a phone call that morning remidning me of it.
    I know about missed appointments et al. The risk is that introducing such a system would begin to introduce a 'paying' NHS. I think that the 111 NHS Helpline should be used more. Patients, who come to the hospital with 'low risk' illnesses, should be sent back and advised to call 111.

    There was this text reminder service that my local NHS used to have, but they somehow stopped it. It would give you a 24-hour notice for your appointment and a number to call, if you would miss it.

    I completely understand your argument, but starting to encourage a 2 quid 'chip-in' may create a problem.
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    (Original post by infairverona)
    I honestly wish there was a good way to penalise people who miss an appointment. It takes 30 seconds to call and say you can't make it. In the meantime there are people sitting waiting for a drop out appointment and you can't be arsed. Like, the whole idea of the NHS is that we are all kinda helping each other out by paying into it. Then you get selfish people taking up scarce appointments and not even turning up. At my practice, if you don't turn up they don't allocate it to someone else. The doctor spends that whole 10 minutes waiting for you to turn up. I would love to say someone should have to pay or is blocked from making an appointment again until they've been spoken to about it (my gym does this if you book a class and don't turn up) particularly for repeat offenders. But because it's in a health context, we seem to automatically baulk at the idea of penalising people even though they have no consideration for the other people THEY have penalised by wasting an appointment
    that is one of the problems. If someone does not turn up, they don't reallocate it to another person. It is the big problem with the Admin staff at some local NHS. The sad truth is that these same hospitals may even be charging the Government for this missed appointment.

    I also would love to have a way to penalize those who can't be bothered to turn up for the appointments. The annoying fact is that if you blocked them from coming to the hospital and they die, the doctor and hospital staff run the risk of losing their license or even facing jail time.

    In the first instance, I think there should be a name and shame policy for missed appointments. Many NHS units are usually local, so it is easy to have a list of people, who decided not to turn up for their appointment. if people know that others will see how selfish and stupid they have been without good reason, then they would change their ways. This should be for repeat offenders.

    My issue is that a free NHS has been the key. Charging, whether it is 2 quid or 20 quid, may start creating problems. For example, if an NHS hospital says that it wants to have a progressive charge from 2quid to 100 quid for one time offenders to serial appointment dodgers. What happens when this person is poor and on benefits? The problem for the serial dodger may be that the hospital is just too far and she may have just been on the wrong end of meeting her appointments. Would the Government have to increase her benefits to cater for this charge? Some dodgy hospitals may even give her a 7am appointment, knowing that she will not meet it and then charge her 100 quid for it.

    There are other things that may come up and we should not create a problem to solution, which may become another problem.
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    (Original post by Dez)
    We already pay for prescriptions. And hospital parking.
    Not in Wales.
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    If they started charging £2 I wouldn't mind but if I got misdiagnosed I'd want the money back

    Edit: wtf are our taxes for then, as well?
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    The only reason it would put me off going is that I already have to wait hours sitting in the waiting room no matter how urgent my problem is. I'm constantly at the doctors, so to some this may seem very small, if they go maybe once or twice yearly but I'm there sometimes as frequently as twice a week. So no, I'm not okay with paying for both £2 and crappy service. My GPs are always trying to rush me out of the room when I've already waited over an hour to see them. If I had to pay, it would make my life even harder and since I've been misdiagnosed in the past, frequently by doctors since they're trying to rush me out, like said above, I'd want my money back.
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    ok so say by charging £2 you cut 10% of appointments which are unnecessary for colds etc and would reduce missed appointments as charge would apply if appointment wasnt cancelled and didnt turn up etc then the crappy service your complaining of will improve and you wont have to wait as long for appointments

    chronic conditions could be exempt from it however im not convinced people with chronic conditions need to be seen that often, i doubt u make more than one appointment for a new problem more than once a month which would result in only £24 a year to pay. Also frequent appointments for long term conditions is also just a sign of poor management, there are ways around this like giving supply of medications to use should things change

    also long term medical conditions dont need to see a gp

    the money raised can then be invested into the nhs to improve services also however i dont think you can argue that it would lead to paying £20 eventually as its main purpose is to prevent people from attending unneccesarily rather than for raising money

    i also dont think a £2 charge would put someone off from making an appointment if it was something serious so outcomes wouldnt be worse

    i would however make prescriptions and hospital parking free as is the case in scotland
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    I'd be up for it if the care and knowledge was there. I've had some pretty bad GP's in my time that I would have to be paid myself to even consider revisiting.
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    (Original post by jooby92)
    chronic conditions could be exempt from it however im not convinced people with chronic conditions need to be seen that often,
    Some of us do. Especially when it can take months to get the right medication. Or even the right diagnosis.
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    Some of us do. Especially when it can take months to get the right medication. Or even the right diagnosis.
    thats not frequent appointments for management of a chronic condition though, thats frequent appointments as you do not have a diagnosis which is separate, for the actual chronic condition you dont need to be seen frequently
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    I'd probably be better off if I spent my £2 on some paracetamol..the NHS do an amazing job (I can't slate it, i'm going into it), however..some if not most don't help, half the time they google the symptoms or look them up in their books..so i'd rather spend my money on a lollipop or painkillers!
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    (Original post by jooby92)
    thats not frequent appointments for management of a chronic condition though, thats frequent appointments as you do not have a diagnosis which is separate, for the actual chronic condition you dont need to be seen frequently
    You clearly don't have a clue. I was seen at least every month for 5 months when I was first diagnosed with asthma because of how difficult it was to control it. When I first started having migraines, I was being seen at least every month for well over a year. I was then sent to neurology and I've had a lot of appointments since then, partly because of the problems the medications has caused and because of how difficult it is to get the condition under control without causing me serious health problems.

    For some chronic conditions, people do need to be seen frequently.
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    (Original post by Zacken)
    Would you make spelling mistakes if you had to pay 2 quid for each one?
    Brutal
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    Technically I don't have a chronic condition but that's because they haven't been able to diagnose my pain. So this that mean for my 3 weekly appointments for painkillers and check up I would have to pay? I really don't think this would be fair. Anyway I live in Scotland so not extremely worried because this would have to happen in England first before it affected me. I think it would be a great shame, not just for me but for everyone, if the NHS which is supposed to be 'free at the point of need' started charging for something as little as an appointment.
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    (Original post by jooby92)
    Would u pay £2 to see a gp? Fee only required if u request the appointment and not if its been arranged by the gp eg if they say come back in three weeks for review or for review of chronic conditions.

    Would a £2 charge decrease how often u made an appointment or would it not affect this and u would still have made all the appointmwnts that u have made in the past.
    Reduce the tax by £2 x the average number of visits so probably about £8 a year and sure i would, you want me to pay twice? lol nah

    I try to not go to the doctors unless its serious or making my life unbearable..
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    (Original post by Tiger Rag)
    You clearly don't have a clue. I was seen at least every month for 5 months when I was first diagnosed with asthma because of how difficult it was to control it. When I first started having migraines, I was being seen at least every month for well over a year. I was then sent to neurology and I've had a lot of appointments since then, partly because of the problems the medications has caused and because of how difficult it is to get the condition under control without causing me serious health problems.

    For some chronic conditions, people do need to be seen frequently.

    i wouldnt consider that as frequent by frequent i meant once a week or more

    plus the examples you gave are all about the initial diagnosis and settling on managment once you are on stable treatment which is the idea of the managment for a chronic condition you wouldnt need to be seen often
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    I have not been to the doctors for a long time, probably like 2 years ago so, would not bother paying as most illnesses can be cured by water and exercise.
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    (Original post by scottishgirl163)
    Technically I don't have a chronic condition but that's because they haven't been able to diagnose my pain. So this that mean for my 3 weekly appointments for painkillers and check up I would have to pay? I really don't think this would be fair. Anyway I live in Scotland so not extremely worried because this would have to happen in England first before it affected me. I think it would be a great shame, not just for me but for everyone, if the NHS which is supposed to be 'free at the point of need' started charging for something as little as an appointment.
    well no you wouldnt pay as that would be a review of your condition which you wouldnt pay for

    and if you are going to use a not fair argument you could equally say that it is not fair that someone who doesnt go to the gp very often is paying in taxes for you to go very often, which is not fair on them (im not making this point just saying it as devils advocate to your not fair comment)
 
 
 
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