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    I would say do anything else, the mark schemes are draconian and it's over all an absolute pain in the arse, mathematical difficulty is close to 0, if you can regurgitate your textbook you should do well...

    In retrospect I would rather have taken additional further maths...
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    It's been a few years since I took it, but it was much easier than A-level chemistry (very different to GCSE) and easier than A-level biology.

    There's some 'You know what we said at GCSE? Well, that was a fib, what really happens is...' (and if you do a physics degree, a similar thing will happen) but the maths is simple and still uses the approximations that make it easier.
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    (Original post by skillzaismine)
    I'm thinking about doing A-level physics but lots of people are either telling me that they dropped out because it's too hard, or it's basically maths.
    When I did A-level physics (in 2012) it was the easiest subject to revise for BUT probably the hardest to get my head around in the first place (although I tend to overcomplicate it). This is because there is VERY LITTLE to know but everything you need to know (well almost everything) requires mental effort (unlike biology where there is alot to know but very little to understand)

    You can easily get away with rote-learning past mark schemes and using the forumla book. So long as you can apply the equations and have a fairly basic working understanding of the topic it is easy to get an A or A*
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    Alevel physics is hard work that can be very interesting. You can get kicks from solving problems like maths but because its science and logical thinking as well, its more fun. Also dont think olevel science is anything alevel science, the questions often demand creative thinking rather than straight forward write what you know, just to let you know.
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    (Original post by Argylesocksrox)
    I would say do anything else, the mark schemes are draconian and it's over all an absolute pain in the arse, mathematical difficulty is close to 0, if you can regurgitate your textbook you should do well...

    In retrospect I would rather have taken additional further maths...
    I second this so much.
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    I thought it was pretty good. Not enough maths though.

    (Original post by rxns_00)
    Yeah I'm pretty sure they will because you could never memorise all those formulas. And honestly at A level you'll understand forces much more and mechanics might seem hard at the start but gets easier with some practice. Plus the A2 mechanics I actually found easier than the AS mechanics haha
    You can easily memorise those formulas. My "formula booklet" for my university physics modules covers a wall and I have to memorise the whole thing.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    I thought it was pretty good. Not enough maths though.



    You can easily memorise those formulas. My "formula booklet" for my university physics modules covers a wall and I have to memorise the whole thing.
    "Easily"
    I don't think the average A level student would be happy memorising the formulas. Of course most of them you would just start remembering anyway, but realistically they can't ask the student to memorise all the constants and formulas in the course at this stage.

    And well, tough. That's uni for you
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    (Original post by rxns_00)
    "Easily"
    I don't think the average A level student would be happy memorising the formulas. Of course most of them you would just start remembering anyway, but realistically they can't ask the student to memorise all the constants and formulas in the course at this stage.

    And well, tough. That's uni for you
    Yeah. You have two years to remember two to three pages of equations and the most complicated one is probably Coulomb's law.
    Why can't they realistically ask for that? If you understand them and have practiced with them it shouldn't be too hard to remember them or be able to derive those which can be derived. I was thinking more the formulas than the constants. Constants could be put in the front of the paper. Even so, if you had a couple of years to memorise a handful of constants(that you use all the time anyway) to 3sf in order to get a good grade in your A-level you'd do it.
    I'm not complaining. I'm just saying that if I can remember all of them you can remember a couple of pages.
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    (Original post by rxns_00)
    "Easily"
    I don't think the average A level student would be happy memorising the formulas. Of course most of them you would just start remembering anyway, but realistically they can't ask the student to memorise all the constants and formulas in the course at this stage.

    And well, tough. That's uni for you
    Why shouldn't you need to memorise the formulas? If you've done enough practice you should know them all anyway, with the exception of the constants (which it is fair enough that they are given) the majority of the people I know who did well in physics rarely if ever looked at the formula book - the questions are about working out what equation to apply, so tbh if you don't have the knowledge of what equations there are to apply then you will struggle.

    There's also a lot of content that is very briefly covered in a level, such as SHM, where you are basically told to memorise 3 results, rather than understanding where they come from (i.e. md^2x/dt^2 =-omega^2 x, solving that to get a general solution etc etc), so i don't really think it is too much to ask to be able to recall the equations
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    Doing it at AS and it's quite something to wrap your finger around but once you understand what's going on and revise well, it's very enjoyable :yep:
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    Yeah. You have two years to remember two to three pages of equations and the most complicated one is probably Coulomb's law.
    Why can't they realistically ask for that? If you understand them and have practiced with them it shouldn't be too hard to remember them or be able to derive those which can be derived. I was thinking more the formulas than the constants. Constants could be put in the front of the paper. Even so, if you had a couple of years to memorise a handful of constants(that you use all the time anyway) to 3sf in order to get a good grade in your A-level you'd do it.
    I'm not complaining. I'm just saying that if I can remember all of them you can remember a couple of pages.
    (Original post by samb1234)
    Why shouldn't you need to memorise the formulas? If you've done enough practice you should know them all anyway, with the exception of the constants (which it is fair enough that they are given) the majority of the people I know who did well in physics rarely if ever looked at the formula book - the questions are about working out what equation to apply, so tbh if you don't have the knowledge of what equations there are to apply then you will struggle.

    There's also a lot of content that is very briefly covered in a level, such as SHM, where you are basically told to memorise 3 results, rather than understanding where they come from (i.e. md^2x/dt^2 =-omega^2 x, solving that to get a general solution etc etc), so i don't really think it is too much to ask to be able to recall the equations
    Lol both of you need to disconnect from the matter on a personal level. Just because people like you and me enjoy physics and continue it onto university level and wouldn't really mind memorising equations because you naturally do anyway, doesn't mean all physics students do. In fact I'd be betting the majority don't

    Making students memorise the equations is really completely missing the point, it's making A levels even more of a stupid memory game rather than teaching students how the equations are derived and what they actually show. I don't see why they'd make you memorise the equations just for the sake of it, it's pointless. Students should focus on their understanding and not their memory.
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    A-Level Physics is nothing like GCSE physics.
    Only take Physics for A-Level if you have a genuine interest in the subject, try reading your textbook from front to back and I you make it to the end without feeling like jumping out a window by all means go for it.
 
 
 
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