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C++ in finance. Watch

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    (Original post by GoldmanSucks)
    Everyone knows this already but thanks for your input.



    Depends on what role you're going for. Sound knowledge of VBA would help alot in IBD, technology and, you'll be a star if you're in operations too.
    Not too sure atm, will likely be looking into project finance/equity structuring.

    I take it then that VBA is more practical than Python?

    I think I have the time to learn both before university starts, and definitely before any internships commence. Just wondering if both fill the same role is there any point learning both?
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Is there any point in learning both VBA and Python for a role in finance or do both do the same thing (in the context of being an intern/junior analyst)
    Learn VBA first, as it will make you marketable. It is actually a very useful practical skill that you will utilize as an analyst, in contrast to what you learn at university or any other languages you may decide to learn and also gives you a competitive edge as you can automate specific tasks using VBA, while your peers may not be able to.

    Regarding Python, its a very nice and strong scripting language that is relatively easy to learn. Learn it for the heck of it. My buddy recently coded an algorithmic trading script which trades a crypto currency based on market movements, and its pretty neat, generating 2% daily returns on ETH (Ethereum) all using Python.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    Not too sure atm, will likely be looking into project finance/equity structuring.

    I take it then that VBA is more practical than Python?

    I think I have the time to learn both before university starts, and definitely before any internships commence. Just wondering if both fill the same role is there any point learning both?
    Since you have picked this life. I'd say learn Excel. In and out. How to conduct financial modelling on excel.
    When you're good, pick a random small company's balance sheet and test out what you've learnt. And analyze critically. It takes time. Buy a book for how to model in excel or something or download a torrent. It's better for you to be an advanced excel and VBA user than to be a mediocre excel user and Python coder.

    But if you're still interested in being fluent in other languages like Python. Do it. It's win win for you in the end.
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    (Original post by GoldmanSucks)
    Since you have picked this life. I'd say learn Excel. In and out. How to conduct financial modelling on excel.
    When you're good, pick a random small company's balance sheet and test out what you've learnt. And analyze critically. It takes time. Buy a book for how to model in excel or something or download a torrent. It's better for you to be an advanced excel and VBA user than to be a mediocre excel user and Python coder.

    But if you're still interested in being fluent in other languages like Python. Do it. It's win win for you in the end.
    Thanks for the info being Able to analyse balance sheets with VBA does sound amazing.
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    (Original post by glebp)
    Learn VBA first, as it will make you marketable. It is actually a very useful practical skill that you will utilize as an analyst, in contrast to what you learn at university or any other languages you may decide to learn and also gives you a competitive edge as you can automate specific tasks using VBA, while your peers may not be able to.

    Regarding Python, its a very nice and strong scripting language that is relatively easy to learn. Learn it for the heck of it. My buddy recently coded an algorithmic trading script which trades a crypto currency based on market movements, and its pretty neat, generating 2% daily returns on ETH (Ethereum) all using Python.
    Yeah I definitely want to learn Python just for the heck of it but as you and GoldmanSucks have pointed out to me VBA will make me more marketable so I guess I'll crack on with that even though it's boring as hell .
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    (Original post by GoldmanSucks)
    You're better off learning MS Excel mate.
    You can't have done much programming in your life if you think Excel has anything to do with it.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    You can't have done much programming in your life if you think Excel has anything to do with it.
    I think he meant becoming really good with excel/VBA is more important than learning a programming language for my chosen career path.
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    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    I think he meant becoming really good with excel/VBA is more important than learning a programming language for my chosen career path.
    Learning how to code well is a lot harder than learning Excel so you should be fine then.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    Learning how to code well is a lot harder than learning Excel so you should be fine then.
    I'd say VBA is at least as hard as Python, but yeah both are much easier than C++, Java etc. So hopefully I can pick it up over the summer 😬.
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    (Original post by ahpadt)
    You can't have done much programming in your life if you think Excel has anything to do with it.
    How is your post relevant to the thread. Maybe you should read previous posts instead of just posting anything just to be part of the conversation.

    (Original post by Oilfreak1)
    I'd say VBA is at least as hard as Python, but yeah both are much easier than C++, Java etc. So hopefully I can pick it up over the summer 😬.
    You're interested in learning, this is good: If you're interested in something it becomes easier compared to someone who's trying to learn because they're told to do so. Good luck with your journey.
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    (Original post by GoldmanSucks)
    You're interested in learning, this is good: If you're interested in something it becomes easier compared to someone who's trying to learn because they're told to do so. Good luck with your journey.
    Thanks, just wrote a programme that pulls stock data from yahoo finance and puts it into excel for me at the click of a button .

    It takes a little bit of fiddling to add new stocks to the table because I have had to use query tables to display the info (macs don't have win http) but can add 300 new stocks in one simple edit if need be. Very excited to see what I'll be able to do when I'm more advanced 😃.
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    People on this thread are clearly not educated enough to give you pertinent advice.

    C++ is used in automated activity because c++ is a compiled language, so it runs faster than interpreted languages like Python.
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    tbh haven't seen it being used much, but i think vba/python are a bit more prominent
    Moron, it's a compiled language thus runs faster. Do you understand the concept of latency?
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    (Original post by DrownedDeity)
    Moron, it's a compiled language thus runs faster. Do you understand the concept of latency?
    thanks for the update
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    (Original post by Trapz99)
    To echo what gr8wizard said, Python and VBA are the most used languages in finance. However, once you learn how one language works it becomes easier to learn another since you will understand the structure. However, python would probably be easier to learn as a first language anyway.
    Different languages have different syntax/features etc rather than learning an entire language as a srarter, acquaint yourself with what programming languages do, and some general common commands present in several languages.

    C++ runs faster, so is far more important than python in latency sensitive activity.
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    (Original post by DrownedDeity)
    People on this thread are clearly not educated enough to give you pertinent advice.

    C++ is used in automated activity because c++ is a compiled language, so it runs faster than interpreted languages like Python.
    So in what way would C++ be able to help me as an analyst where Excel VBA would be unable to?
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    (Original post by gr8wizard10)
    literally YouTube guides for the absolute basics of the language and then play about with code yourself to see what you can produce.
    Stackoverflow is also your best friend when you encounter problems
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    (Original post by glebp)
    Learn VBA first, as it will make you marketable. It is actually a very useful practical skill that you will utilize as an analyst, in contrast to what you learn at university or any other languages you may decide to learn and also gives you a competitive edge as you can automate specific tasks using VBA, while your peers may not be able to.

    Regarding Python, its a very nice and strong scripting language that is relatively easy to learn. Learn it for the heck of it. My buddy recently coded an algorithmic trading script which trades a crypto currency based on market movements, and its pretty neat, generating 2% daily returns on ETH (Ethereum) all using Python.
    wtf, how much has it made him now?
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    (Original post by KnightCode)
    wtf, how much has it made him now?
    don't believe this guy lool 2% daily is foolish, professional investors are lucky to get 10% per year
 
 
 
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