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    (Original post by punkroses)
    No no, EU students can get free university tuition because of EU law or something. So they CAN but Scottish universities prioritise Scottish students for it.
    (Original post by jneill)
    No. EU is tuition free in Scotland, but offer requirements are typically very high.

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    I've never heard of it before being free for EU students, it's not something you typically hear of where I am
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    (Original post by KhaleesiStorm)
    I've never heard of it before being free for EU students, it's not something you typically hear of where I am
    Yeah I am confused by the whole thing, I forgot the entry requirements are really high for EU students, because if it was easy for them to get in and free, everyone would be applying and Scottish people wouldn't get the offers? Though, I don't know how it is in other EU countries.
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    (Original post by punkroses)
    Yeah I am confused by the whole thing, I forgot the entry requirements are really high for EU students, because if it was easy for them to get in and free, everyone would be applying and Scottish people wouldn't get the offers? Though, I don't know how it is in other EU countries.
    We have to pay which I think angers many Scots who see it unfair that Scots students are getting less and less places at Scottish Unis. I have to go to England to do the courses want to
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    Isnt the problem with option 2 is that getting offered a place for medicine is uncertain, whereas if you get offered a place in Poland its guaranteed you will be doing medicine? Youd have to confident in your ability.
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    (Original post by KhaleesiStorm)
    We have to pay which I think angers many Scots who see it unfair that Scots students are getting less and less places at Scottish Unis. I have to go to England to do the courses want to
    Yeah, I mean, it probably frustrates a lot of people. Though, it's so hard to find the right course for you and I am applying to universities this year, hopefully I'll get into a Scottish one!
    We're a bit distracted from OP's question aha...
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    (Original post by KhaleesiStorm)
    Are you sure? I live in Scotland and to my knowledge only Scottish students get free university from Scottish Unis.
    We get free tuition as well. SAAS pays the tuition. And it's not different if you went to Germany you'd also get free tuition.

    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Isnt the problem with option 2 is that getting offered a place for medicine is uncertain, whereas if you get offered a place in Poland its guaranteed you will be doing medicine? Youd have to confident in your ability.
    Exactly. It's only that I'd not only be studying but also living in Poland for six years. And I'd have to stick to it no matter what. There's no thing like transferring or so and that's what I'm afraid of.
    While, for example, there are no language barriers in Scotland.
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    (Original post by samman282)
    We get free tuition as well. SAAS pays the tuition. And it's not different if you went to Germany you'd also get free tuition.


    Exactly. It's only that I'd not only be studying but also living in Poland for six years. And I'd have to stick to it no matter what. There's no thing like transferring or so and that's what I'm afraid of.
    While, for example, there are no language barriers in Scotland.
    Read these forums and get an idea of how hard it is to get on a medicine course. If you cnat get on one in Germany, then is it any easier here? If you have top grades, experience and whatever degree you do plus you score well in the tests... Its a case of backing yourself. Its a gamble but imo id rather do option 2 and work hard. I would also ahve the chance to study in Scotland and England which gives variety and I think sounds like a better experience. There are people on the forums with good grades who cant get a place even after 2 or 3 tries.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Read these forums and get an idea of how hard it is to get on a medicine course. If you cnat get on one in Germany, then is it any easier here? If you have top grades, experience and whatever degree you do plus you score well in the tests... Its a case of backing yourself. Its a gamble but imo id rather do option 2 and work hard. I would also ahve the chance to study in Scotland and England which gives variety and I think sounds like a better experience. There are people on the forums with good grades who cant get a place even after 2 or 3 tries.
    You mean I should go to Poland? Because the second option was going to Scotland .
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    (Original post by samman282)
    You mean I should go to Poland? Because the second option was going to Scotland .
    Never mind I thought it was perfectly clear what i was suggesting. It must be a Dr to be thing.
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    (Original post by 999tigger)
    Never mind I thought it was perfectly clear what i was suggesting. It must be a Dr to be thing.
    It was, I just wanted to go sure I got it right .
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    (Original post by Des_Lumières)
    Yes, I experienced something similar to what you describe in France. The drop out rate there averages at about 50% for undergrads in state unis.

    I think it's important t to have the state system because not everyone can afford to pay (even if it needs improving). If a country is just reliant on a 'private' system then students who can't pay are being let down. This is becoming the case in the UK (even if the fees are in the form of loans). Education shouldn't be an opportunity for private organisations to make profit in my opinion - it's about the society!

    How did you find out about Poland? That's interesting. I was in France for my first year of uni, as the fees were less and the course more appealing.
    UK based universities are state-owned so how could you get fees lower than free in France compared to Scotland?
    Well, I think tuition fees are a good thing. Without universities will have a lack of funding. Then, either private companies would need to invest or universities would end up being worse than you can expect - like in Germany.
    I did a research about universities abroad offering a medical education and Poland is clearly the best. Many students are going to Romania since it's cheaper but the quality of education isn't good there.
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    (Original post by samman282)
    UK based universities are state-owned so how could you get fees lower than free in France compared to Scotland?
    Well, I think tuition fees are a good thing. Without universities will have a lack of funding. Then, either private companies would need to invest or universities would end up being worse than you can expect - like in Germany.
    I did a research about universities abroad offering a medical education and Poland is clearly the best. Many students are going to Romania since it's cheaper but the quality of education isn't good there.
    Compared to Oxford I mean, where I had a place.

    Obviously, in Scotland it is free for me to go to university. I chose to go to France because for the subjects I wanted to study were more interesting there than in Scotland.

    In the UK, the universities are officially 'state unis'. However, because the government is not paying for students to attend (except in Scotland) they are essentially public universities masquerading as state ones. Whatsmore, they are public universities that are subsidised by the gouvernement (as the money is given to them from the state coffers - only students are not directly benefiting in many of the essential ways eg. being able to study freely without debt and, for many, to devote themselves to their study without needing to work excessive hours).

    Where do the fees come from and where do they go? From the pockets of students into the the pockets of the top échelon of university managers... So in actuality the state sector is being GIVEN AWAY to a relatively small number of individuals operating within the parameters of any other private sector. It's more than a shame. And a minefield

    It would be logical to invest more money in education and then allow students to benefit from this - without giving the system away to private parties. Invest and reap the benefits throughout society. Why didn't anyone think of that? Well, they did and because the're bent this is what governments spend their time trying to get around doing.
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    I haven't gone through the medical school application process for a few years now but....

    Have you checked with UK medical schools that they would consider your application? I vaguely remember something about many medical schools will not consider you if you have previously studied medicine at a different university. I have no idea whether that includes medicine in a different country. I'm not certain at all.

    Just something for someone else to clear up on this thread hopefully
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    (Original post by samman282)
    Hi guys!
    I'd just like to get a few opinions:
    So I want to study Medicine and as a German with basically no chance to study medicine in Germany there are two options left:
    1) Study medicine in English in Poland: it's a 6 year program, but there is an obligatory 1 year internship at the end of the studies so it's 7 years.
    My thoughts: I like Poland, but the course is VERY demanding. I was there last year and left, because I wanted to try to be offered admission at private German universities instead of having their system. We had tests every day needed in order to be allowed to take the final examination, plus we had to prepare for partials during the year and had lectures to 6 and 8 p.m.. It's manageable though and I'd be willing to stick to it. Total cost including estimated cost of living would be 81000 pounds.

    2) Do a 4 year Bachelor's degree in Scotland which would be tuition free for me since I'm an EU student and then apply to 4 year UK graduate entry medicine programs. If that doesn't work out, apply to graduate entry medicine programs in Poland.
    My thoughts: I'd choose Scotland over Poland at any time. But that option is less direct and lasts a year longer.
    Total cost would be 67000 pounds, but if I had to continue in Poland it'd be 83000 pounds.

    What would you do if you were in my place?
    Bear in mind that graduate entry medicine in the uk is crazy, crazy competitive. Something to factor in.


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    Undergraduate degrees are completely free for EU students in Scotland, as they are for Scottish students. There is a course fee of about £1800, but SAAS will pay this for both Scottish and EU students if it's your first degree. However, EU students do not get any access to maintenance grants or loans.

    If you already have an undergraduate degree, you pay £1800 a year, whether you're Scottish or EU.

    Similarly, EU students can study in England, and will get access to the same £9000 a year tuition fee loan that English students do (and repay it under the same '9% over 21k' terms, although, as for English students, this is adjusted to local cost of living if they move abroad after graduating). However, as in Scotland, EU students studying in England will not get any access to maintenance loans.

    Source: an EU student about to start in Scotland in a few months.

    If you are an English student and this rankles, remember that you can take advantage of any of the fantastic-quality and free tertiary education systems available to you throughout Europe that you choose ...
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    (Original post by samman282)
    Hi guys!
    I'd just like to get a few opinions:
    So I want to study Medicine and as a German with basically no chance to study medicine in Germany there are two options left:
    1) Study medicine in English in Poland: it's a 6 year program, but there is an obligatory 1 year internship at the end of the studies so it's 7 years.
    My thoughts: I like Poland, but the course is VERY demanding. I was there last year and left, because I wanted to try to be offered admission at private German universities instead of having their system. We had tests every day needed in order to be allowed to take the final examination, plus we had to prepare for partials during the year and had lectures to 6 and 8 p.m.. It's manageable though and I'd be willing to stick to it. Total cost including estimated cost of living would be 81000 pounds.

    2) Do a 4 year Bachelor's degree in Scotland which would be tuition free for me since I'm an EU student and then apply to 4 year UK graduate entry medicine programs. If that doesn't work out, apply to graduate entry medicine programs in Poland.
    My thoughts: I'd choose Scotland over Poland at any time. But that option is less direct and lasts a year longer.
    Total cost would be 67000 pounds, but if I had to continue in Poland it'd be 83000 pounds.

    What would you do if you were in my place?
    OP, unless you are very confident that you will get an excellent result in a non-medicine undergraduate degree and meet all the other GEM requirements, or that you would be happy pursuing a career in whatever subject it is if your graduate application to medicine is unsuccessful, then for the love of all that is holy don't pursue a 4-year undergraduate degree for the sake of a shot at at place on a GEM program.

    First of all, the competition ratio is anywhere from 10:1 to 30:1 on these GEM courses. The entrance requirements might look relatively low (you can get in with 'good enough' school and university results), but that is because these courses screen out a huge number of otherwise qualified applications at the pre- and post-interview stages. You need to show commitment, volunteering, aptitude, medical work experience, self-awareness, introspection, reflection, and commitment again, and that's just to make it to interview.

    Second, assuming you are from somewhere in the EU, you wouldn't qualify for maintenance grants or loans from either SAAS in Scotland or SFE in England; you would have to support yourself throughout both degrees, and it's almost impossible to work part-time during a GEM course. To apply for maintenance loans for GEM, you need to have been resident in the UK not for the purposes of studying - and they will demand to see evidence. You might not even qualify for the tuition fee loan from SFE for GEM for the same reason.

    Third, by the time you would be applying to GEM courses, it will already be 2021. The future of these programs is seriously in doubt, and they may well have been scrapped by then. It's a huge gamble to take unless you're committed to a potential career in your undergrad topic if medicine doesn't pan out.

    Why don't you try to apply to undergraduate medicine in Scotland instead? It's much less competitive than GEM, meets all of the usual UK regulatory requirements, and is free! Even if it would take you an extra year to gain or improve your qualifications, surely that's better then spending an extra four years doing a degree that you're not really interested in?
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    (Original post by prospectivemed56)
    Undergraduate degrees are completely free for EU students in Scotland, as they are for Scottish students. There is a course fee of about £1800, but SAAS will pay this for both Scottish and EU students if it's your first degree. However, EU students do not get any access to maintenance grants or loans.

    If you already have an undergraduate degree, you pay £1800 a year, whether you're Scottish or EU.

    Similarly, EU students can study in England, and will get access to the same £9000 a year tuition fee loan that English students do (and repay it under the same '9% over 21k' terms, although, as for English students, this is adjusted to local cost of living if they move abroad after graduating). However, as in Scotland, EU students studying in England will not get any access to maintenance loans.

    Source: an EU student about to start in Scotland in a few months.

    If you are an English student and this rankles, remember that you can take advantage of any of the fantastic-quality and free tertiary education systems available to you throughout Europe that you choose ...
    Britain has better uni's and unless you speak German or whatever European language it seems pretty pointless to go there...
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    (Original post by Conservationofmass)
    Britain has better uni's and unless you speak German or whatever European language it seems pretty pointless to go there...
    They speak fairly good English in Ireland, and at €3000 a year Trinity College Dublin is a hell of a lot better value than £9000 a year for London Metropolitan University. :-p

    Britain has many fine universities, but many students could receive an equal or better education, for much less money, not to mention the huge personal and cultural development that comes from studying overseas.

    Nobody is forcing you to go abroad. But overseas study on equal terms with local students is one of the many wonderful things made possible by the EU.
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    Where are you going to get £83000 from?
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    Im a studying Medicine in Warsaw currently so if you have any specific questions, just drop me a message
 
 
 
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