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Government orders BBC to drop online recipes Watch

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    What's the difference between BBC Food and BBC goodfood?
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    (Original post by Aj12)
    What market is there in cooking recipes? There are billions of sites offering free ones, and the most popular cook books are endorsed by celebrities, so I doubt the BBC is really eating into that market.
    Exactly.
    If a public service is out performing the market then we should keep it given that the justification of privatisation is that it does it better.

    The BBC is an example of a public service which far out performs it's private rivals. It goes against everything the government stands for.
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    Important to remember that the BBC isn't being cut to save money, the reason given is that it's unfair on the private sector.
    And people say uncle Rupert and his chums have no influence.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Important to remember that the BBC isn't being cut to save money, the reason given is that it's unfair on the private sector.
    And people say uncle Rupert and his chums have no influence.
    Correct. And under the current rules it can't be as commercial as it would like anyway - e.g. no ads on BBC web pages visible to UK residents (but the same pages when viewed internationally do have ads - online recipes being a good example).
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    Just privatise the BBC and let them compete in the market unhampered.
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    (Original post by Jammy Duel)
    So you're suggesting that the sole reason that the BBC does anything decent is because it is in public ownership?
    Yes. The BBC can afford to make mistakes and experiment. By contrast commercial channels can only offer tried and tested formulaic programming. Sure, there are great commercial programme makers but they tend to deal in one off high budget epics. Just head state side if you want to se just how awful commercial to is. 25 minutes of adverts an hour is no fun.
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    (Original post by otester)
    Just privatise the BBC and let them compete in the market unhampered.
    They're not hampered, they perform better than private firms...
    Besides in your utopia nothing can be in hampered as there'd be no protection for our money.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    They're not hampered, they perform better than private firms...
    In meant in that particular way, not in general.

    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Besides in your utopia nothing can be in hampered as there'd be no protection for our money.
    ?
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    What's the difference between BBC Food and BBC goodfood?
    Turns out they are moving (some/most/all?) the recipes to BBC Good Food, and closing BBC Food.

    Panic over...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36308976
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    (Original post by jneill)
    Turns out they are moving (some/most/all?) the recipes to BBC Good Food, and closing BBC Food.

    Panic over...

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-36308976
    It seems weird that they had two websites for the same purpose to begin with.
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    How pathetix, anyone who uses the BBC for recipes would simoly move to another free service
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    Not to mention the fact IPlayer is being abolished.

    It's nothing to do with saving money, apparently it's to benefit private corporations.
    Again, a well run public service which outperforms it's private competitors goes against the whole ideology of the 'market it is always best'.

    It's so great that we have to ruin a public service to allow it to compete.
    They are not aboloshing IPlayer. The BBC are launching a streaming service that will be similar to Netflix for shows that go past the 30 day IPlayer limit and older BBC shows. We will still be able to watch shows within 30 days of the original showing on IPlayer.
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    (Original post by agentawesome)
    They are not aboloshing IPlayer. The BBC are launching a streaming service that will be similar to Netflix for shows that go past the 30 day IPlayer limit and older BBC shows. We will still be able to watch shows within 30 days of the original showing on IPlayer.
    They are charging extra for that service unlike Iplayer which is free.
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    Maybe its an effort to get rid of the leftist bias and cultural marxism. Why should the nanny state dictate what we should be eating? It's like the Third Reich.
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    They are charging extra for that service unlike Iplayer which is free.
    Well, so long as they don't get rid of iPlayer, that's okay

    From what I understand - it's just a bonus, so you have an extra netflix like service, which you do have to pay for, for older programmes which wouldn't normally be on iPlayer, so that you would have to buy. So paying there makes sense... (doesn't mean I'll be getting it though..)
    Anyway, that's what I hope it is. Would be rather peeved if they got rid of iPlayer.
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    (Original post by morgan8002)
    It seems weird that they had two websites for the same purpose to begin with.
    That's moreorless the point that everyone was missing.

    The Government wants the licence fee frozen - something nobody has an issue with really - but in order for the BBC to carry on, it needs to save money.

    One way of saving money is to reduce the duplication on its website. And the BBC website is bloody huge.

    So taking down one part and merging it with another part that is a commercial sector makes sense, frankly.

    But ofc, it's "interference with the BBC" so people are angry without the facts.
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    That seems a bit overbearing, and the reason for it, to allow newspapers to better compete, is absolute rubbish. Let the newspaper die, even my parents generation don't read them any more.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    That's moreorless the point that everyone was missing.
    Well, the point wasn't missed as such... the BBC has changed what it is doing following the public criticism of their original announcement. The plan was for the content to be archived (i.e. removed), now, more sensibly, it will be relocated to BBC Good Food.
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    (Original post by Drewski)
    That's moreorless the point that everyone was missing.

    The Government wants the licence fee frozen - something nobody has an issue with really - but in order for the BBC to carry on, it needs to save money.

    One way of saving money is to reduce the duplication on its website. And the BBC website is bloody huge.

    So taking down one part and merging it with another part that is a commercial sector makes sense, frankly.

    But ofc, it's "interference with the BBC" so people are angry without the facts.
    Except those aren't the facts.
    This saves next to no money.

    The reason given by Osborne was (laughably) that it was unfair on the private sector. Not that it cost too much money.

    The BBC outperforms it's private cope ironies and has higher approval ratings. Why not leave a good service be rather than ruining it to make private competitors feel better about themselves?
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    (Original post by Bornblue)
    But the whole ideology of the market is that the best naturally rise to the top. Yet now the success of the market is dependent on getting rid of public services.

    If the BBC can offer a better service why not let it? Why does it matter if it's unfair on the market if the service is good?
    Public services aren't part of the free market and so you're argument fails to point out an inconsistency in the ideology.

    Not that anyone is 100% free market anyway.
 
 
 
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