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    (Original post by Canongon)
    Currently I work in an emergency gas service centre, and volunteer at weekends in a care home. I've only recently moved home to my tiny town and currently don't drive so jobs aren't that easy to come by!
    Got some hospital work exp in the pipeline though, and a few interviews coming up for HCA positions.
    Just trying to articulate how much I want to study medicine is difficult at the moment!

    Thank you all for the words of wisdom, means a lot!
    Ahh cool, yeah if you can get it then I'd defo recommend HCA work. The way I look at it (and I'm no expert, this is just my opinion), is that there are going to be ten other people trying to get that place. You need to do everything you possibly can to make yourself stand out. There is no such thing as too much work experience.
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    I would like to study postgraduate medicine but I didn't get good grades for science or maths at GCSE, let alone A-Levels. I did quite well at A-Levels with two A's and a B in English Lit, Sociology and History. I currently study History at the LSE which is not related to science or medicine.

    Do I have to take some A Levels and retake GCSEs to be able to study medicine? I don't know anything about science.
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    (Original post by DrProspective)
    Canongon, I got a 2:2 in an arts degree (one everyone calls a mickey mouse degree...) at a uni no one's heard of and BCC at A level, and I managed to get in this year. Relevant experience, a decent UKCAT/GAMSAT, any 2:1 (or even 2:2 for that matter) and a positive attitude will make you a strong candidate.
    Hi DrProspective,
    I am very much in the same position as you looking to apply for 2018, (not an arts degree though!) so you've given me a lot of hope! What universities did you apply for? Interview at etc? And what do you think made you stand out to the others? Your perspective would be very much appreciated!
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    Hello, I'm a first year GEM at Nottingham with a BA and just wanted to give some encouragement - it's no barrier at all!
    As someone's pointed out, there are lots of humanities grads on the courses that accept their applications. Someone in our second year also told me that, of people on the course, the highest rate of dropout is among people whose first degree was biomed ;p so definitely don't see being an arts grad as any kind of difficulty.

    To the people who've posted about not having a degree from a big name uni or not having great A levels - seriously, don't let that put you off. You'd have to check with each uni individually, but I don't think any of them that take arts grads score you on where you degree is from, or what it was, only whether it was a 2.I or higher. Nottingham certainly doesn't. Of 86 people, I'm the only Oxbridge graduate on my course (to my knowledge).
    Medicine takes the concept of meritocracy really seriously (in this century). They also take objectivity in admissions very seriously. The name attached to your degree means nothing, if you come with a 2.I, a good UKCAT/GAMSAT, and proper work experience.

    As far as A levels are concerned, I did chem and bio as evening classes the year before I applied, and actually got a B in chemistry. Which is a little bit embarrassing because that's as a mature student and wouldn't qualify me for a undergrad course I can confirm that your a levels are not taken into account whatsoever, in any way, shape, or form (except for Southampton - that still leaves you with four places to apply). The nature of graduate entry medicine, and the original purpose for the course, means that there are lots of students who feel like they've underperformed on exams in the past. If you can demonstrate that you've got the ability to manage the academic side of things, then you can apply on completely even ground with anyone else.

    Good luck to everyone!
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    (Original post by ThomasPassion)
    Hello, I'm a first year GEM at Nottingham with a BA and just wanted to give some encouragement - it's no barrier at all!
    As someone's pointed out, there are lots of humanities grads on the courses that accept their applications. Someone in our second year also told me that, of people on the course, the highest rate of dropout is among people whose first degree was biomed ;p so definitely don't see being an arts grad as any kind of difficulty.

    To the people who've posted about not having a degree from a big name uni or not having great A levels - seriously, don't let that put you off. You'd have to check with each uni individually, but I don't think any of them that take arts grads score you on where you degree is from, or what it was, only whether it was a 2.I or higher. Nottingham certainly doesn't. Of 86 people, I'm the only Oxbridge graduate on my course (to my knowledge).
    Medicine takes the concept of meritocracy really seriously (in this century). They also take objectivity in admissions very seriously. The name attached to your degree means nothing, if you come with a 2.I, a good UKCAT/GAMSAT, and proper work experience.

    As far as A levels are concerned, I did chem and bio as evening classes the year before I applied, and actually got a B in chemistry. Which is a little bit embarrassing because that's as a mature student and wouldn't qualify me for a undergrad course I can confirm that your a levels are not taken into account whatsoever, in any way, shape, or form (except for Southampton - that still leaves you with four places to apply). The nature of graduate entry medicine, and the original purpose for the course, means that there are lots of students who feel like they've underperformed on exams in the past. If you can demonstrate that you've got the ability to manage the academic side of things, then you can apply on completely even ground with anyone else.

    Good luck to everyone!
    This really does give encouragement. I think I may designate you my career coach is that's okay as you really seem to have all this together haha.

    Who did you do your Bio and Chem evening classes with if you don't mind me asking? And did you then just self-teach physics along side in order to pass the GAMSAT?
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    Hi, I'm still doing my undergrad, actually only in first year, doing a humanity at Oxford. I've recently become interested in graduate medicine, always was to an extent but never thought it was a realistic career choice until I found out that unis offer places to BA students. I'm as yet not completely decided that this is what I want to do after uni, it's sort of a toss up between a psychology conversion with an aim to getting on a D Clin Psy course, or becoming a doctor then training as a psychiatrist. Was firstly wondering if anyone who has gone down either route would say why they chose that and not the other? But also, what sort of work experience exactly do medical courses want? I know for a D Clin Psy you realistically need 1-3 years as an assistant clinical psychologist, but for medicine it seems a bit vague? Would I need to take a gap year after my BA to work in the care industry? What sort of roles would I apply for? Is there anything I can do during my undergrad years? Also, I'm thinking of doing maths A level next year, should I bother?

    Just FYI, at the moment I work for a helpline outside of uni and I'm training to be an independent visitor for children in care. Do either of those constitute as work experience?
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    omg this is actually inspirational. heres me with a 2.2 in nursing and really worried about applying to medicine. Can i just ask what route you took, and how you studies for the GAMSAT (as thats my only option at the moment)
 
 
 
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