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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    How did you choose your A Levels, and do you like them? Are there any that you regret, and what is the best way that I can prevent myself from regretting a subject?
    You should do maths. I hated it at GCSE level, and was on a B grade until about a month before the exam. A-level Maths is very different. It's the "most asked for" A-level when applying to university. Even if you're applying for an essay-based subject, maths will still be useful later on.

    I completely messed up when choosing A-levels, but it was fine:
    I started in September of year 12 doing English Literature, Music Technology, Media Studies, and Geography. I dropped English within two weeks, and started Physics. Then I started teaching myself Maths in October. Finished with 5 AS-levels, then dropped Music Technology, and started teaching myself AS and A2 Further Maths.

    I don't really regret anything (I wasn't actually allowed to do AS Maths as I failed an algebra test that they gave everyone before the GCSE exam). In fact, I'm glad I was so indecisive; I was able to try out a lot of subjects before swapping, so I wasn't anxious that I'd picked the wrong subject later on.
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    I chose Maths, Chemistry, Biology and French.
    They are my favourite subjects
    And
    It turns out that I'm doing my best in all of them. (GCSE though let's see how that changes to AS lol)
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I'm in Year 11, currently doing my GCSEs, and I've already chosen my primary choice of A Levels-
    English Language, French, Classical Civilisation and Drama (with AS Dance as an enrichment.)
    Why have I chosen these?

    English Language: I've always been fascinated by language and linguistics, and I always seek more than iGCSEs about bees and Maria Rose Head. I like to delve into phonology, derivation and even lexical semantics. If it involves words, I like it. This is one that I definitely am taking, no matter what anyone says.
    BUT I get bored reading quite easily, so I am NOT choosing English Literature.

    French: I speak French. Enough said. I want to study French at university, even if I am anti-cigarettes...

    Classical Civilisation: At the moment, I am studying Latin, and am the only student, but I do find it interesting, so I've chosen Classics as a way of enhancing that, as our sixth form don't offer Latin. However, I worry that I will soon get bored of learning just about the ways in which they all lived, and their values and whatever for 2 years, or whether I just like the Latin part of it, as it's language [see above].

    Drama: I've always been fascinated by theatre, and often perceived it as something I want to bring myself into, even if not as an actor. However, I am a terrible actor, and need 67/80 or so in my exam to get an A.

    AS Dance: I didn't take it for GCSE, which has been one of my regrets, so I'm taking it simply to enrich my understanding of dance.

    Now...
    I've gone over these subjects and realised that all of them are essay based subjects- I don't know whether that will agitate me too much. As such, I've considered other options, but I am really worried about making the wrong decisions. Here are my other options, and I was wondering if anyone could give me any guidance so that I make the right decisions and don't put myself through two more years of slight misery, considering I'll have to do these subjects practically every day.

    Maths: I like maths. I've always been interested in finding out about the ways that numbers work, and I am never content with just knowing a bit. However, I am currently on a high A, low A* at maths, and I'm in two minds about whether-
    a) GCSE is enough to get anywhere
    b) I want a qualification in maths
    c) Whether I'll be able to cope with everything at once; I mean, I have looked at the past papers and they don't look friendly.
    But I absolutely love formulas and algorithms; I get way too much joy from finding out just a bit about binomial distribution or activity networks, or even De Moivre's Theorem. Whether it will help me in the long run, I don't know. I just don't want to have an unusually low grade.

    Chemistry: It's HIGHLY unlikely that I pick chemistry, due to the fact that I have absolutely no interest in physical sciences. But, like with maths, I am always willling to find out more about the world. I've always hated science, never been particularly good at it, but I do have a slight interest in chemicals and their behaviour, such as why sodium's electronic configuration is 1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 [I think], but I just don't know whether I'll get bored easily or find it difficult. I also don't know whether I want an A-Level in it, due to the fact that I can get bored in GCSE lessons...

    Of course, there are a few more, but I hope this presents the dilemma that I'm facing at the moment.

    But this leads me to ask-
    How did you choose your A Levels, and do you like them? Are there any that you regret, and what is the best way that I can prevent myself from regretting a subject?
    I chose my A-Levels by thinking about what I enjoyed at school (History and Business) and then looking at related subjects and chose which one I liked best. I eventually chose Economics and Classical Civilisation (hey buddy 👋🏼)

    I regret none of my options now but if you feel likeyou do then just try to change in the first few weeks. I only really knew that I liked them after a few lessons so I beg you don't stress.

    I'd say the only method of prevention is to choose subjects you enjoy at GCSE, not just the Ines you are good at. You've got to be motivated and be truly interested in a subject at A-Level, as you're not just given information like you are at GCSE unfortunately 😔

    But I really would not stress about it. Just focus on your grades and then you'll be able to choose whatever you want, and you never really know if you're gonna like the subjects til you've had a few lessons imo.

    Hope this helps x
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    (Original post by TeenPolyglot)
    I'm in Year 11, currently doing my GCSEs, and I've already chosen my primary choice of A Levels-
    English Language, French, Classical Civilisation and Drama (with AS Dance as an enrichment.)
    Why have I chosen these?

    English Language: I've always been fascinated by language and linguistics, and I always seek more than iGCSEs about bees and Maria Rose Head. I like to delve into phonology, derivation and even lexical semantics. If it involves words, I like it. This is one that I definitely am taking, no matter what anyone says.
    BUT I get bored reading quite easily, so I am NOT choosing English Literature.

    French: I speak French. Enough said. I want to study French at university, even if I am anti-cigarettes...

    Classical Civilisation: At the moment, I am studying Latin, and am the only student, but I do find it interesting, so I've chosen Classics as a way of enhancing that, as our sixth form don't offer Latin. However, I worry that I will soon get bored of learning just about the ways in which they all lived, and their values and whatever for 2 years, or whether I just like the Latin part of it, as it's language [see above].

    Drama: I've always been fascinated by theatre, and often perceived it as something I want to bring myself into, even if not as an actor. However, I am a terrible actor, and need 67/80 or so in my exam to get an A.

    AS Dance: I didn't take it for GCSE, which has been one of my regrets, so I'm taking it simply to enrich my understanding of dance.

    Now...
    I've gone over these subjects and realised that all of them are essay based subjects- I don't know whether that will agitate me too much. As such, I've considered other options, but I am really worried about making the wrong decisions. Here are my other options, and I was wondering if anyone could give me any guidance so that I make the right decisions and don't put myself through two more years of slight misery, considering I'll have to do these subjects practically every day.

    Maths: I like maths. I've always been interested in finding out about the ways that numbers work, and I am never content with just knowing a bit. However, I am currently on a high A, low A* at maths, and I'm in two minds about whether-
    a) GCSE is enough to get anywhere
    b) I want a qualification in maths
    c) Whether I'll be able to cope with everything at once; I mean, I have looked at the past papers and they don't look friendly.
    But I absolutely love formulas and algorithms; I get way too much joy from finding out just a bit about binomial distribution or activity networks, or even De Moivre's Theorem. Whether it will help me in the long run, I don't know. I just don't want to have an unusually low grade.

    Chemistry: It's HIGHLY unlikely that I pick chemistry, due to the fact that I have absolutely no interest in physical sciences. But, like with maths, I am always willling to find out more about the world. I've always hated science, never been particularly good at it, but I do have a slight interest in chemicals and their behaviour, such as why sodium's electronic configuration is 1s2 2s2 2p6 3s2 [I think], but I just don't know whether I'll get bored easily or find it difficult. I also don't know whether I want an A-Level in it, due to the fact that I can get bored in GCSE lessons...

    Of course, there are a few more, but I hope this presents the dilemma that I'm facing at the moment.

    But this leads me to ask-
    How did you choose your A Levels, and do you like them? Are there any that you regret, and what is the best way that I can prevent myself from regretting a subject?
    Well, you've thought it out a lot. There are a couple things I'd like to point out:

    1) English Language can be seen as a softer subject than Literature (hear me out here). I love linguistics, I hate reading; what I found was that the way linguistics shape the meanings within fictional texts is preferable to non-fiction. The texts which are studied at A Level are so much more enjoyable. That's why I picked Lit.

    2) Maths is great. It's nice to have a subject that isn't subjective. You know that 2+2=4. (That was a reference to Orwell's 1984, a great text I studied in Lit). It does seem really scary at first, there can be more letters and symbols than numbers. You'll soon realise it's all just pretty harmless.

    3) Think of a uni course you want to do. Check out the entry requirements of three unis you wouldn't mind attending. That'll give you an idea of any subjects which will give you an advantage over other applicants. This is the biggest downfall of some of my friends.

    I'm applying for LLB Law with offers from Exeter, Southampton, and Cardiff; an interview at Essex, and awaiting Warwick. Predicted A*AA.
 
 
 
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