Tuition fees are a good thing/

Announcements Posted on
Four things that unis think matter more than league tables 08-12-2016
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samesea)
    Who are you to judge what degrees are worth completing though? You may find them unnecessary or irrelevant maybe, but that's far from what the people who do these courses feel. Believe it or not people aren't taking degrees because they're fun.

    The country can afford to pay for every English, Welsh and Northern Irish students' university fees. I can't see how someone on The Student Room of all places would disagree that education is a right for all, regardless of background or how much your family earns.
    (Original post by DanteTheDoorKnob)
    I didn't make the thread. I pointed out the under current system the government uses more of his money to fund them, if they were cheaper they'd use less.

    A lot of degrees are unlikely to significantly improve salary alone, if you're taking a degree for money reasons and you do something that has little monetary value that's a bad decision. If you're doing a degree to get into a profession (eg teaching) that's great, you need it, the skills are important.

    I don't think higher education is a right for all, I don't think university education even teaches you very much.
    Completely agree.

    It infuriates me when I read that people think higher education is a right. I'm from a low income single parent background and I study a difficult degree with a lot of contact hours and assignments, I work part time to supplement the costs of university, even though I get help from bursaries (from my company AND from my university). It's tough. But I STILL don't think it's my right to a degree. That line of thinking is outrageous.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    If we can afford to help the refugees then we can afford to send people to university, simple really
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Relative poverty..?

    Not being able to afford a degree is not poverty or even relative poverty.
    It's not easy to get out of the cycle of poverty in the UK. Even more so without a degree. It's social exclusion, hence being stuck in this vicious cycle. It's a chronic disadvantage and the government should be doing their all to help as many young people caught up in this as possible.

    2,000 bright University candidates lost out on the opportunity to go to top universities born in 1991-1992, missing out in place of less-gifted well off students. Where do you think they will end up? All of that wasted potential could have been put into studying for their degree, ultimately to end up in a high-paying job in the future.

    There should be no social class in education whatsoever.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samesea)
    It's not easy to get out of the cycle of poverty in the UK. Even more so without a degree. It's social exclusion, hence being stuck in this vicious cycle. It's a chronic disadvantage and the government should be doing their all to help as many young people caught up in this as possible.

    2,000 bright University candidates lost out on the opportunity to go to top universities born in 1991-1992, missing out in place of less-gifted well off students. Where do you think they will end up? All of that wasted potential could have been put into studying for their degree, ultimately to end up in a high-paying job in the future.

    There should be no social class in education whatsoever.
    I was born in 1992 and I'm at uni....and as I said earlier i'm from a low income family.

    Why would having a degree guarantee you a high paying job? People without degrees aren't doomed. There are other options for them....?
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by not_lucas1)
    If we can afford to help the refugees then we can afford to send people to university, simple really
    I agree with this to some extent.

    We give away £700 million a year. £700 million. Just a fraction of that would mean we could send even more disadvantaged young people to university.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hezzlington)
    I was born in 1992 and I'm at uni....and as I said earlier i'm from a low income family.
    Good for you.

    2000 other people your age with the potential, if not more, aren't.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samesea)
    Good for you.

    2000 other people your age with the potential, if not more, aren't.
    I don't understand why that would be...

    It's certainly not because of tuition fees.
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    How can an educated person say education isnt a right for all. Imagine being uneducated in the present day, you wouldn't have a clue about anything. We live in a time where education is a necessity not a 'learn if you want too'. Look at the Africans you see on adverts 'walking miles everyday to get food/water' if they had any common sense and knowledge they'd move to the source
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by not_lucas1)
    How can an educated person say education isnt a right for all. Imagine being uneducated in the present day, you wouldn't have a clue about anything. We live in a time where education is a necessity not a 'learn if you want too'. Look at the Africans you see on adverts 'walking miles everyday to get food/water' if they had any common sense and knowledge they'd move to the source
    If everybody goes to university and gets a degree, we'll have even more saturation of the job market. A degree is just a means to an end. If you think that you are going to get a degree and walk into a nice 25k+ graduate job with great work/life balance and fantastic career progression purely on the basis of your academic qualifications then you are seriously mistaken.

    The increase in tuition fees is a seperate issue that I don't necessarily agree with. However I do not believe that we are all entitled to whatever the hell we want at the expense of the taxpayer. If the money isn't coming from us, the consumers (because a degree is essentially a product), then where is it going to come from?

    I don't know how to respond to your last comment...
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by iEthan)
    — let's break this down.

    The emboldened point proves that you shouldn't be speaking on behalf of people, as you clearly lack respect for them. Students don't think they're entitled. In 2003, for me to go to University — I would have finished with a £20,000 debt. Now, in 2021 when I finish university — I'll have a debt of ~£48,000. That is the problem. I have no issue paying for my degree. I have issue with the extortionate and unacceptable cost of the degree.

    Oh, and it's a languages degree. It might not be STEM and I'm OK with that. I adore languages. It makes me no better or worse than you.
    Language grads earn a lot nowadays. The problem is universal and ultimately universities need funding due to things like inflation and we cant cut tuition fees without the buyer bearing the cost, otherwise the quality of teaching will suffer
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by samesea)
    I agree with this to some extent.

    We give away £700 million a year. £700 million. Just a fraction of that would mean we could send even more disadvantaged young people to university.
    Wrong. 12 billion
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    That is your opinion, OP.

    It is my opinion to question your morality if one of the richest countries on the planet cannot, or rather does not want to, pay for tertiary education.

    Not to mention you completely failed to think the situation through. The people who do a degree, on average, get better jobs. They earn more. That means they pay more taxes. They contribute more to the economy, helping growth (google it, there are so many studies to the effect of education, including university, on economic growth).

    The only thing that one can and should question is the number of people attending. If you get to a point where half the country has been to university, then I do agree that that is excessive. And yes to a certain extent there are ridiculous degrees out there. But that doesn't mean none of these should exist. What would a country be without artists? You think the culture would be the same if no one studied languages (not to mention that some people who studied languages get lucrative jobs).
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by hezzlington)
    Completely agree.

    It infuriates me when I read that people think higher education is a right. I'm from a low income single parent background and I study a difficult degree with a lot of contact hours and assignments, I work part time to supplement the costs of university, even though I get help from bursaries (from my company AND from my university). It's tough. But I STILL don't think it's my right to a degree. That line of thinking is outrageous.
    Interesting. In Germany they'd find you outrageous.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by The gains kinggg)
    lecturers*
    lecturers'*
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    Something true of the "education as a right" brigade is that their commitment to this principle typically runs out at precisely the point they no longer see specifically themselves as net beneficiaries of the state's acting on it.

    People intending to do bachelor's degrees consider that the state (i.e. my postman and my dear old nan) should fund these, but they reveal themselves as less keen on the idea of their having to chip-in to pay for my Master's in Etruscan Pottery and my doctoral study of Roman Fireplaces. Education then stops being 'a right' when what's meant is that someone else's will be subsidized out of your starter wage at PWC, and few enough can persuasively explain the seeming inconsistency.

    I don't want to pay for your degree. I suspect your time at university will be measured largely in 'pre-drinks' and social media posturing. You won't attend your 9am lectures and you'll faff about on Whatsapp on the rare occasions you turn up at others. I think you're essentially an idiot and your motivation for continuing your 'studies' is only outcome oriented and the function of a grasping self-interest. If throwing-in more through my taxes I'd sooner it be for improved elementary education, better wages for teachers at all levels, and continuing-education programmes.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    I would be brilliant if we, as a country, could afford for pay for people to go to university and charge no tuition fees.

    At the present time, that is unrealistic and a contribution from the student, paid AFTER they graduate is sensible.

    But the level of that contribution need serious thinking. It should be limited, it should be lower than it is now and most definitely should not be increase, as the Government appear to be planning. Somewhere up to around £3-4,000 a year seems a sensible compromise on the situation, with a commitment to try and reduce it in future, if the financial situation makes it possible.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RK)
    I would be brilliant if we, as a country, could afford for pay for people to go to university and charge no tuition fees.

    At the present time, that is unrealistic and a contribution from the student, paid AFTER they graduate is sensible.

    But the level of that contribution need serious thinking. It should be limited, it should be lower than it is now and most definitely should not be increase, as the Government appear to be planning. Somewhere up to around £3-4,000 a year seems a sensible compromise on the situation, with a commitment to try and reduce it in future, if the financial situation makes it possible.
    Agree, agree, agree!
    Offline

    2
    ReputationRep:
    It would be great if we actually had more jobs for people after they graduate.
    Offline

    3
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by RK)
    I would be brilliant if we, as a country, could afford for pay for people to go to university and charge no tuition fees.

    At the present time, that is unrealistic and a contribution from the student, paid AFTER they graduate is sensible.

    But the level of that contribution need serious thinking. It should be limited, it should be lower than it is now and most definitely should not be increase, as the Government appear to be planning. Somewhere up to around £3-4,000 a year seems a sensible compromise on the situation, with a commitment to try and reduce it in future, if the financial situation makes it possible.
    On what basis should the contribution be lowered. It does not affect accessibility to higher education
    Offline

    1
    ReputationRep:
    The problem is that in today's age people are incredibly entitled. Going to university, no matter how rubbish the institution, no matter how ridiculous the degree, has entwined itself within the culture of England. Growing up means going to university and having a degree and passing a few exams where you have to memorise a bunch of things or write a few useless essays - young people measure their self worth on these worthless privileges.

    If you tell an 18 year old that they will have to pay the cost of their degrees, then they'll throw a tantrum and vote for the party who promises cheaper education. Self-entitlement runs deep in this country.

    The solution is to completely stop funding universities and degrees, apart from the essential NHS funded courses. Encourage people to learn a trade from the age of 15 which will provide them with skills, useful work and an income for the rest of their lives (or at least for the time being). 16 year olds need to learn and prepare to be adults again instead of university students remaining children well into their mid 20s.

    Edit: If you don't want to fund a university or a degree, or any other such nonsense, then avoid paying tax if you can help it. I shudder knowing that 25% of my wages disappear every week into the coffers of daddy government.
 
 
 
Write a reply… Reply
Submit reply

Register

Thanks for posting! You just need to create an account in order to submit the post
  1. this can't be left blank
    that username has been taken, please choose another Forgotten your password?
  2. this can't be left blank
    this email is already registered. Forgotten your password?
  3. this can't be left blank

    6 characters or longer with both numbers and letters is safer

  4. this can't be left empty
    your full birthday is required
  1. Oops, you need to agree to our Ts&Cs to register
  2. Slide to join now Processing…

Updated: June 6, 2016
TSR Support Team

We have a brilliant team of more than 60 Support Team members looking after discussions on The Student Room, helping to make it a fun, safe and useful place to hang out.

Poll
Do you think you'll achieve your predicted A Level grades?
Useful resources
Uni match

Applying to uni?

Our tool will help you find the perfect course

Articles:

Debate and current affairs guidelinesDebate and current affairs wiki

Quick link:

Educational debate unanswered threads

Groups associated with this forum:

View associated groups

The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

Quick reply
Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.