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TSR Prime Minister's Questions - May 21, 2016 Watch

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    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    Mr Speaker,

    Would the Prime Minister agree with me that rehabilitation is more important than punishment in the prison system and to truly tackle crime we most focus on the causes of crime?
    I would and indeed it is my belief that in ideal circumstances, we should address the causes rather than the consequences and aim to ensure that our prisons provide rehabilitation programmes to allow prisoners to reintegrate into the community rather than remain at the edge as outlaws who are prone to reoffend. However, the world isn't an ideal place and so these changes can't happen over night. There still are cases in which locking one away and losing the key, or even execution, are the better and safer options. In short, I believe that not everyone can be rehabilitated.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    I would and indeed it is my belief that in ideal circumstances, we should address the causes rather than the consequences and aim to ensure that our prisons provide rehabilitation programmes to allow prisoners to reintegrate into the community rather than remain at the edge as outlaws who are prone to reoffend. However, the world isn't an ideal place and so these changes can't happen over night. There still are cases in which locking one away and losing the key, or even execution, are the better and safer options. In short, I believe that not everyone can be rehabilitated.
    I thank the Prime Minister for his answer. Whilst I welcome the first half of his answer, I disagree with him very strongly on execution. Surely the chance of getting it wrong and killing one of our own citizen's is enough to understand that the death penalty is not the answer, before we even look into the economic and societal costs of reimplementing it?
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    (Original post by PetrosAC)
    I thank the Prime Minister for his answer. Whilst I welcome the first half of his answer, I disagree with him very strongly on execution. Surely the chance of getting it wrong and killing one of our own citizen's is enough to understand that the death penalty is not the answer, before we even look into the economic and societal costs of reimplementing it?
    I can't offer more than agreeing to disagree. The argument of getting it wrong is a purely hypothetical one, particularly with the increasing precision and reliability of criminology (specifically technical methods of proving one's guilt), the economic argument is based on the current wrong and wasteful implementation of the capital punishment, i.e. the real cost could be negligible and almost equal to a standard trial, and I'm not sure what the societal cost is meant to be since we are living in an increasingly secular society in which, according to more and more people, humans are mere products of chance with no value beyond their material existence and as such the value of human life is completely arbitrary. I believe that the life of an Islamic terrorist who intends to commit a terrorist attack in London and kill hundreds of likely innocent people is worth less than my early morning fart.
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    (Original post by Life_peer)
    I can't offer more than agreeing to disagree. The argument of getting it wrong is a purely hypothetical one, particularly with the increasing precision and reliability of criminology (specifically technical methods of proving one's guilt), the economic argument is based on the current wrong and wasteful implementation of the capital punishment, i.e. the real cost could be negligible and almost equal to a standard trial, and I'm not sure what the societal cost is meant to be since we are living in an increasingly secular society in which, according to more and more people, humans are mere products of chance with no value beyond their material existence and as such the value of human life is completely arbitrary. I believe that the life of an Islamic terrorist who intends to commit a terrorist attack in London and kill hundreds of likely innocent people is worth less than my early morning fart.
    I again thank the Prime Minister for his answer, and I do agree to disagree on this matter.
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    This concludes Questions to the Prime Minister
 
 
 
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