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    If you love maths, do it. (Disclaimer: This only applies if you get an A or A* at GCSE)
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    (Original post by Astro-Smarties)
    Hello, i was a C/B grade student at GCSE. I wasn't great at GCSE (not a fan of wordy maths, much prefer algebra) and now i have just done 2/4 of my AS maths exams. I really love doing A Level maths, and i am much better at it than i ever felt i was at GCSE. Its by no means easy though. I've been working at B/A grades on C1 papers, C/Bs at C2 and C grades in mechanics and decision. My advice is if you like it, are willing to put effort in and need it for a job/uni etc. then its a good idea to do it at A Level. If you're only doing it because you think it will look good then don't bother I have put a fair bit of effort in, like going after school, doing questions and recaps at home. But it doesn't feel like as much work because i really enjoy it.
    Thank you! I'm also like this I hate the wordy questions but my algebra is fantastic! I tend to get full marks on algebra questions in the GCSE exam and I find them to be easy marks. I love maths too so thanks for the advice. I am definitely going to work hard even during the summer.
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    Maths is all about practise really, AS is straight forward (C1,C2). A2 is harder but doable if you put in the work. It also depends on your applied module S1 and s2 are the easier ones compared to mechanics and decision maths I think


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    (Original post by richpanda)
    If you love maths, do it. (Disclaimer: This only applies if you get an A or A* at GCSE)
    I might get an A if I'm lucky but I was a C/B student ever since my last mock. I'm sure I've improve massively though, fingers crossed
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    (Original post by imran_)
    Maths is all about practise really, AS is straight forward (C1,C2). A2 is harder but doable if you put in the work. It also depends on your applied module S1 and s2 are the easier ones compared to mechanics and decision maths I think


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    Should I teach myself C1/C2
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    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    I might get an A if I'm lucky but I was a C/B student ever since my last mock. I'm sure I've improve massively though, fingers crossed
    Is that down to not working? If not, then I've got some bad news. It sounds harsh but there is a sizeable chunk of people who simply don't have the ability to do a level maths. Of all the people in my sixth form AS year who got B's at GCSE for maths and took AS maths, they either dropped it or are struggling.
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    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    Should I teach myself C1/C2
    C1 can easily be self taught.
    C2, you many need a teachers help as topics such as circles can be tricky
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    (Original post by _Xenon_)
    Alright thanks mate!!
    So if I do revise I'll be one step ahead!
    Well what grade do you want in a level maths?
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    GCSE:
    Maths: A
    Additional maths: A

    My individual modules at AS (UMS)
    C1: 98/100, A
    C2: 78/100 B
    M1: 92/100 A

    At A2 currently working around A's, few A*'s.

    C1 is the **** easy exam normally (sorry if I make it sound like I'm bragging) and is the non calculator paper. C2 and M1 I would say are harder (and I hated last years paper for C2 clearly). During the exam season I did EVERY SINGLE past paper my college had available and in one of the exams it went back to 2005.

    Early on in AS I was quite lazy as I basically did the homework and basic textbook revision but I got a range in homeworks and class tests of D's to B's. When I started doing past papers as revision (not loads at first) I was getting to A's. Basically do lots of past papers because some of the questions are hard in comparison to class tests.

    In A2 apart from C3 and C4 I'm doing D1. This year is pretty much the same in revision except that exam questions are far more horrific if you do not do past paper revision. There was a long question which then said the following: show that cos(4*veta) + 4cos(2*veta) = cos^4(veta)+3. That question first time was horrific for me and I got it wrong with like 15 lines of workings. Did it several months later with exam practice and I did it in about 5 lines.

    Maths you need to understand the formulas and how something works and then being able to apply it. If you don't understand something that you learn you need to clear it up with a teacher in a workshop etc and then you need to understand how to apply it since exam questions will make it far more complicated. If you struggle to understand topics and stuff already in maths you will have a very hard time at A level.

    Advice for revision: if you have one of those large textbooks with knowledge and recap questions along with exam style, skip the knowledge and recap questions. I also wouldn't even use the textbook that much to read up on knowledge, just ask your teacher if you don't understand something. In A2 (can't say much about my AS XD) my very early revision used the textbook, later on (and including later AS) I NEVER used the textbook for revision.
    Perfect description.
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    LOL I didn't even read the q properly for my maths exam, this year, so ive lost my a* the paper was easy aswell.
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    (Original post by Ayaz789)
    Well what grade do you want in a level maths?
    A or A*
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    (Original post by richpanda)
    Is that down to not working? If not, then I've got some bad news. It sounds harsh but there is a sizeable chunk of people who simply don't have the ability to do a level maths. Of all the people in my sixth form AS year who got B's at GCSE for maths and took AS maths, they either dropped it or are struggling.
    I'm actually good at maths and yes it is down to not working that I achieved grades such as C/B in mock exams and I have a feeling that I can actually do extremely well if I do actually work hard if you get what I mean.

    I'm naturally good at algebra and I heard A level maths is mainly that so that sounds exciting! I find algebra questions very easy actually.

    I heard A* students failing A levels and I still want to do it...
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    (Original post by imran_)
    C1 can easily be self taught.
    C2, you many need a teachers help as topics such as circles can be tricky
    Thanks for your help. I'll get started with exam solutions once my GCSEs finish.
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    There are a ton of people on this thread saying that you need an A/A* at GCSE to be able to do A level but tbh I don't think that that's true at all. I was predicted an A* at GCSE and got a high A, but I know people in my AS maths class that got low Bs and are doing really well. I think that as long as you're really committed to the subject you can do it with a B or above. You have to really really want to do it though. I was predicted a B at AS level and at the start of the year I was getting Es and Ds because I was doing the minimum amount of work I could get away with. Once I got into the swing of things though, and started actually doing extra practise at night and past papers, my grades have gone up to B/A grade. I wouldn't even say that it's my hardest subject. Don't let people saying you need a really high grade to do maths discourage you, if you're willing to put the work in then you can definitely do it.
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    (Original post by Charlotte.P)
    There are a ton of people on this thread saying that you need an A/A* at GCSE to be able to do A level but tbh I don't think that that's true at all. I was predicted an A* at GCSE and got a high A, but I know people in my AS maths class that got low Bs and are doing really well. I think that as long as you're really committed to the subject you can do it with a B or above. You have to really really want to do it though. I was predicted a B at AS level and at the start of the year I was getting Es and Ds because I was doing the minimum amount of work I could get away with. Once I got into the swing of things though, and started actually doing extra practise at night and past papers, my grades have gone up to B/A grade. I wouldn't even say that it's my hardest subject. Don't let people saying you need a really high grade to do maths discourage you, if you're willing to put the work in then you can definitely do it.
    Hi thank you so much!
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    (Original post by Charlotte.P)
    There are a ton of people on this thread saying that you need an A/A* at GCSE to be able to do A level but tbh I don't think that that's true at all. I was predicted an A* at GCSE and got a high A, but I know people in my AS maths class that got low Bs and are doing really well. I think that as long as you're really committed to the subject you can do it with a B or above. You have to really really want to do it though. I was predicted a B at AS level and at the start of the year I was getting Es and Ds because I was doing the minimum amount of work I could get away with. Once I got into the swing of things though, and started actually doing extra practise at night and past papers, my grades have gone up to B/A grade. I wouldn't even say that it's my hardest subject. Don't let people saying you need a really high grade to do maths discourage you, if you're willing to put the work in then you can definitely do it.
    I like this: were you predicted an A* because you were hard working at GCSE ?
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    (Original post by Rajive)
    I like this: were you predicted an A* because you were hard working at GCSE ?
    Pretty much, although I've been good at maths and science type subjects all the way through school (not so good at English and stuff like that though )
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    (Original post by Charlotte.P)
    Pretty much, although I've been good at maths and science type subjects all the way through school (not so good at English and stuff like that though )
    Me two, hate essays and that
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    (Original post by Rajive)
    Me two, hate essays and that
    Don't even ask me why I took RS at A level sometimes I don't even know
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    (Original post by Vikingninja)
    GCSE:

    Advice for revision: if you have one of those large textbooks with knowledge and recap questions along with exam style, skip the knowledge and recap questions. I also wouldn't even use the textbook that much to read up on knowledge, just ask your teacher if you don't understand something. In A2 (can't say much about my AS XD) my very early revision used the textbook, later on (and including later AS) I NEVER used the textbook for revision.
    The textbook was basically my life only ever used the mixed exercises, but I wouldn't have gotten anywhere near my final grade without the textbook...
 
 
 
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