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    (Original post by Helloworld_95)
    They're forbidden but it's worth asking around to see if it's actually enforced. At least in my halls they didn't really mind, they usually only really brought out fines for things that damage the room or cause problems for other people.
    In my halls they were strictly enforced as mini fridges can cause serious problems for other people-they can overload the electric systems 'causing power outages which are a major inconvenience for people studying
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    how did the topic of this thread turn into mini fridges? Can we go back to what i'm trying to discuss....
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    (Original post by super_kawaii)
    At most universities they are forbidden though, unless you have a legitimate medical issue that requires one, backed up with evidence from respected medical professionals.

    It definitely is worth reading your contract through fully to make sure you don't break it and end up faced with legal proceedings
    At mine, we were allowed mini fridges in our rooms, but you could only have a standard fridge or freezer if you had a medical need for it.
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    (Original post by RF_PineMarten)
    At mine, we were allowed mini fridges in our rooms, but you could only have a standard fridge or freezer if you had a medical need for it.
    There was nowhere enough room for standard size fridges at my uni, but mini fridges were only allowed if you could provide proof backed up by medical professionals of a health condition that required one, such as diabetes
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    (Original post by intoxycated)
    .. for some reason.

    When you finish first year, you'll go on to living in houses - you'll have to pay a deposit of around 300 pounds depending on the rent.

    SAVE UP THAT MONEY FROM THE START OF THE YEAR or you'll be stuck like me and absolutely broke.


    Unless of course you have rich ass or well off parents who can provide you with that
    gat as much work done as you can before uni and in breaks (as long as your academics aren't affected and you have some time to enjoy yourself or get a term time job in a bar or something.
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    University is probably the time most people start struggling with mental health - symptoms tend to become very obvious at this stage of life and may even become destructive to yourself and/or others around you. So my advice would be, if your friends start to notice changes in your behaviour or if you notice them yourself - talk to your GP about it. It's best to get help before your mental health gets worse and you'll end up destroying your relationships, friendships, studies etc.

    Friends sometimes come and go, cherish the ones who stay, forget the ones who don't, though it will sound extremely difficult at first.
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    1. get a job so that you have money to start paying deposits and stuff before you go to uni and some spare cash for freshers

    2. budget for starting to pay next years accommodation in the summer

    3. when your contract says you must pay for the whole contract then you have to pay for the whole contract, no amount of TSR threads bemoaning your financial situation/flatmates will change that

    4. a lot of people find uni hard at time, struggle to make friends, don't like drinking a lot, regret their course choice etc... talk to the people around you, ask for help and don't bury your head in the sand, you can improve the situation you're in and you won't be the only one
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    1. Get a part time job and you'll never be so broke that you need to bulk freeze a load of stuff.

    2. University is full of fair weather friends. Just don't let it get you down. You'll wonder why Sophie from flat 2 didn't text you back hen you invited her to a club night when you were joined at the hip during freshers .. it happens.

    3. Get a job.

    4. Learn to cook using spices and tinned stuff like tomatos/chickpeas etc.

    5. Organise your stuff by module in folders that you can take to class and you'll never have a problem revising or doing essays later on as its all in one spot to refer back to.
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    (Original post by intoxycated)
    how did the topic of this thread turn into mini fridges? Can we go back to what i'm trying to discuss....
    Mini fridges are always a hot topic in the uni life forum :yum:
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    Best advice I could give - check your timetable straight away!!

    I thought that there wouldn't be any classes on during Freshers Week so I missed my very first class :dontknow: I was so clueless
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    (Original post by intoxycated)
    .. for some reason.

    When you finish first year, you'll go on to living in houses - you'll have to pay a deposit of around 300 pounds depending on the rent.

    SAVE UP THAT MONEY FROM THE START OF THE YEAR or you'll be stuck like me and absolutely broke.


    Unless of course you have rich ass or well off parents who can provide you with that
    Thank you!
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    Also, another one I remembered!

    While it's important to do well academically, when it comes to applying for jobs, your degree subject and classification will be nothing more than a tick in a box, so it's important to get involved with extra curricular things, such as part time jobs, student ambassador roles, society committee roles or student politics so you can develop skills that will be necessary to prove you fit the person spec for any postgrad courses or jobs you apply for post graduation
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    Loads of people have similar and different uni experiences.

    I think the most important advice that i'd give would be as long as the Bible if I had my chance so I'll write a few...

    1) Get. A. Job. Now, I worked over summer to pay for a new laptop as my old one was broke. I always had a job during sem 1 but hated it. Kind of regret quitting. But that's another story. I think if you have a real issue with spending (like I do) you need to get a job because for some, not even budgeting down to your last penny will be the only thing to do to save money. It makes things like 2nd year housing accommodation far more easier as some times housing is more expensive than student accom. So save up during summer and you REALLY don't need to spent THAT much during freshers. It's a myth you need to blow all your finances.

    2) Leading from Freshers. Now you honestly don't need to go out every single night especially if your Freshers lasts two weeks. I remember I went out all week for the first week and only went to the big events on the 2nd and that's when I met my friends that I still speak to and see (even though I no longer go to their current uni). I say get to know your flatmates, first, then make friends when you're out. Now, bare in mind, these "friends" you'll meet with 90% be forgotten and they'll forget you after Freshers. That's just how it is. And that's completely FINE. I never met any close friends until sem 2 and I've met my best mate during then too. If a friendship isn't developing then don't force it. These things are inevitable. Instead of forcing it, make sure you strengthen the friendships and bonds you've already created.

    3) Extra curriculum activities are the best; whether it be a student rep, joining societies, etc just do something outside uni. You can meet new people and gain new experiences which can last a long time. I'm a student rep, also a tutor and I shall be a Global Buddy next year. I got all these amazing things just cause I applied for a student rep. It will look good on your CV. I'm doing this as I wanna go into teaching and meeting new people is just fun!

    4) Don't be afraid if you feel like your life is crumbling or you're feeling lonely or missing home. These feelings will come and go so make sure you surround yourself with positive people. You'll defo complain and ***** about how ridiculous the workload is and etc that's all natural. If it gets all a bit too much, speak to your academic advisor or see the uni GP and let them refer you to a specialist. You don't need a mental health condition to get into therapy. The majority find it helps, but some don't. Just try it if you feel like you need to talk to someone and you don't want to overburden your friends.

    No matter how bad or low uni will get (and it defo won't be 100% sailing ships) - life will always have a plan to work itself out and those future tears will come and go. Don't let ugly people ruin your uni exp. Surround yourself with joyous and positive people and you'll have the best time!
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    1) Being in university halls will not necessarily give you a better time than being in private accommodation.
    - Especially if your halls are far away from the campus!

    In my experience if your accommodation is far from the main campus you can:
    - Waste a lot of time walking
    - Become unintentionally lazy about doing social stuff like going out to the union or city, especially after a busy day at uni.

    Also there is no guarantee you'll get on with people in your accommodation.

    So with hindsight I'd rather be closer to the social stuff (save money!) and meet more people out by living in private halls than gamble on whether or not you become besties with your flatmates.
    It's nice to assume you will but in reality it just might not happen!

    [I don't mean for this to sound negative but I got the feeling before I went that uni halls were some kind of magic formula for ultimate uni happy fun time, they're not! There's just a few more people per floor vs per house in private accommodation. With being a bit friendly I'm sure there's no real difference here]

    2) If you are unsure if you want to join a club during freshers fair don't make the assumption that you can easily look them up online afterwards!
    A lot of facebook pages (this is the main thing clubs use, not official web pages) don't give proper details of when and where the clubs meet up and what their usual set up is.
    So.. be brave! :horse: + Get the details at the fresher's fair and pay your fees there and then.
    - It will encourage you to go check them out when you have already put money down for the privilege!

    3) When looking for next year's accommodation be aware of estate agents!
    A lot of the time they will ask you to pay a NON-refundable "administration fee" just to put you on their books.
    You are then effectively tied to that estate agent and end up just looking for properties with them.
    So ask around and try to find an agent that treat their clients well (relatively speaking!) and have lots of properties available.

    When applying for a house that you and your mates want to go for they may ask for a deposit, even when you don't know if you have secured the property as you are only just applying.
    Some friends of mine paid this in cash.
    When they didn't get the property it took the estate agent several weeks to refund them the money and they did it by bank transfer. (So my friends were constantly rechecking their bank accounts)
    If you have to give a deposit I'd recommend doing this bank transfer so there is a record of you giving them the money... just in case!

    Finally, don't spend forever worrying about uni.
    Just throw yourself into it and you'll be fine.
    Study hard and make time for hobbies and chilling with friends :five:
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    (Original post by soup-dragon)
    1) Being in university halls will not necessarily give you a better time than being in private accommodation.
    - Especially if your halls are far away from the campus!

    In my experience if your accommodation is far from the main campus you can:
    - Waste a lot of time walking
    - Become unintentionally lazy about doing social stuff like going out to the union or city, especially after a busy day at uni.

    Also there is no guarantee you'll get on with people in your accommodation.

    So with hindsight I'd rather be closer to the social stuff (save money!) and meet more people out by living in private halls than gamble on whether or not you become besties with your flatmates.
    It's nice to assume you will but in reality it just might not happen!

    [I don't mean for this to sound negative but I got the feeling before I went that uni halls were some kind of magic formula for ultimate uni happy fun time, they're not! There's just a few more people per floor vs per house in private accommodation. With being a bit friendly I'm sure there's no real difference here]

    2) If you are unsure if you want to join a club during freshers fair don't make the assumption that you can easily look them up online afterwards!
    A lot of facebook pages (this is the main thing clubs use, not official web pages) don't give proper details of when and where the clubs meet up and what their usual set up is.
    So.. be brave! :horse: + Get the details at the fresher's fair and pay your fees there and then.
    - It will encourage you to go check them out when you have already put money down for the privilege!

    3) When looking for next year's accommodation be aware of estate agents!
    A lot of the time they will ask you to pay a NON-refundable "administration fee" just to put you on their books.
    You are then effectively tied to that estate agent and end up just looking for properties with them.
    So ask around and try to find an agent that treat their clients well (relatively speaking!) and have lots of properties available.

    When applying for a house that you and your mates want to go for they may ask for a deposit, even when you don't know if you have secured the property as you are only just applying.
    Some friends of mine paid this in cash.
    When they didn't get the property it took the estate agent several weeks to refund them the money and they did it by bank transfer. (So my friends were constantly rechecking their bank accounts)
    If you have to give a deposit I'd recommend doing this bank transfer so there is a record of you giving them the money... just in case!

    Finally, don't spend forever worrying about uni.
    Just throw yourself into it and you'll be fine.
    Study hard and make time for hobbies and chilling with friends :five:
    I'd recommended only paying a deposit while you are signing the tenancy agreement or after signing the tenancy agreement. And yes a recipt of the transaction is a must.
 
 
 
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