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When did you start revising for your GCSE's Watch

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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Thank you so much, everyone, for your replies.
    But how long did you spend revising for like 1 topic, for instance, C4 (Chemistry). How many weeks or hours would it take you to cover the whole of the topic c4 until the point where you have memorised it all?
    I know you want a definite answer with a timeframe but it's hard to say; it depends on the individual - how good your revision methods are, how much you spend revising per day, how much you space the revision out, etc.

    What I wouldn't recommend is trying to start doing more than an hour of revision a day until you get to the time before year 11 mocks, as if you do start revising heavily at the start of year 11 then you will likely feel burnt out by the time you get to the mocks, let alone the actual exams.

    As a general guideline: revise a couple hours a day for the weeks before your mocks, and then a few hours a day for the couple months leading up to your real exams.

    But really, it's not the amount of time that matters, it's how much you need to learn and how much of that you have learnt. If you already know 100% of each topic then you wouldn't need to revise at all, but obviously none of us are in this position.

    You will have subjects, and topics within those subjects, that you know very well, and subjects/topics that you know very badly. Revise the bad ones more, and prioritize getting your core subjects (English, maths, science) up to whatever grade you want as they will be the only ones that most universities care about.

    If you're a year 10 (I assume you are) then at this moment the best thing to do is to ensure you understand everything they're teaching you in lessons, and asking questions when necessary. If you want to give yourself a headstart, do a quick review of content you have learnt in lessons whenever you feel you're starting to forget it, but don't feel the need to do hours of revision a day until year 11. Revise for mocks, but other than that as long as you understand what you're learning at the moment then you'll be fine.

    Oh, the only exception to this would be languages - languages essentially require you to memorize a ton of different words, so a small amount of revision (even just five or ten minutes a day) will pay off a lot.
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    (Original post by KomradeKorbyn)
    I know you want a definite answer with a timeframe but it's hard to say; it depends on the individual - how good your revision methods are, how much you spend revising per day, how much you space the revision out, etc.

    What I wouldn't recommend is trying to start doing more than an hour of revision a day until you get to the time before year 11 mocks, as if you do start revising heavily at the start of year 11 then you will likely feel burnt out by the time you get to the mocks, let alone the actual exams.

    As a general guideline: revise a couple hours a day for the weeks before your mocks, and then a few hours a day for the couple months leading up to your real exams.

    But really, it's not the amount of time that matters, it's how much you need to learn and how much of that you have learnt. If you already know 100% of each topic then you wouldn't need to revise at all, but obviously none of us are in this position.

    You will have subjects, and topics within those subjects, that you know very well, and subjects/topics that you know very badly. Revise the bad ones more, and prioritize getting your core subjects (English, maths, science) up to whatever grade you want as they will be the only ones that most universities care about.

    If you're a year 10 (I assume you are) then at this moment the best thing to do is to ensure you understand everything they're teaching you in lessons, and asking questions when necessary. If you want to give yourself a headstart, do a quick review of content you have learnt in lessons whenever you feel you're starting to forget it, but don't feel the need to do hours of revision a day until year 11. Revise for mocks, but other than that as long as you understand what you're learning at the moment then you'll be fine.

    Oh, the only exception to this would be languages - languages essentially require you to memorize a ton of different words, so a small amount of revision (even just five or ten minutes a day) will pay off a lot.
    Oh, thank you so much, however, everything I learn in class I forget it in about a few days. Even when I revise the full topic, it will all be gone in about 2 weeks. It's like am just revising the information not learning it as it does not stay in my brain forever.

    Also, I appreciate you typing all of that, ty.
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Oh, thank you so much, however, everything I learn in class I forget it in about a few days. Even when I revise the full topic, it will all be gone in about 2 weeks. It's like am just revising the information not learning it as it does not stay in my brain forever.

    Also, I appreciate you typing all of that, ty.
    Don't worry, nothing stays in anyone's brain forever; that's why we have to revise

    If you feel you are forgetting everything soon, then you should change the way you're learning. In class try noting down things that the teacher says that seem important - sometimes writing things down helps embed them into your memory - although don't just write everything down as listening to them speak is still important to make sure you're actually taking the information in.

    Don't try revising the entire topic in a short space of time if you feel you forget the information soon, you have plenty of time so you can just break each topic down and do a little bit of it each day in lots of detail, ensuring you understand everything before going onto the next bit. Textbooks are bad for this - they contain a lot of extra information, the majority of which you don't really need to know and will just slow down your revision.

    Instead, you should get a revision guide, I find the CGP ones to be best, especially for more memory-based subjects like the sciences. Now, other guides on the internet will be able to explain good revision techniques better than me, but essentially just avoid doing nothing but reading the revision guide - this is passive revision, and you won't take in much information, so you'll forget it quickly.

    You should instead do active revision, where you're actively doing something to interact with the content you're learning - such as creating revision cards to test yourself on the content, or writing out the stuff you need to learn in your own words, condensing down the important bits from the revision guide in a way you remember well.

    These things still aren't entirely necessary yet, considering it's only year 10. Try out different revision methods before the mocks, find something that works well. The sooner you develop these good revision techniques, the easier next year will be and remember, year 10 is essentially practice for year 11 - you have lots of time to figure out how to learn best, how the exams work, etc, and whilst it's important to make sure you understand the content you're learning, it isn't necessary to be a master at every subject at this point in time.
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    Never picked up a book in my GCSE years, I just went to the lessons and that was it. Did pretty well in the exams too
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    I began in January by ensuring I made notes/revision cards for all my subjects etc but I didn't properly start until the February before exams... Though personally I wish I had started earlier as now I'm trying to recap and learn the new stuff that we were only taught a few weeks ago even though some of those exams are in a couple of weeks time


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    (Original post by KomradeKorbyn)
    Don't worry, nothing stays in anyone's brain forever; that's why we have to revise

    If you feel you are forgetting everything soon, then you should change the way you're learning. In class try noting down things that the teacher says that seem important - sometimes writing things down helps embed them into your memory - although don't just write everything down as listening to them speak is still important to make sure you're actually taking the information in.

    Don't try revising the entire topic in a short space of time if you feel you forget the information soon, you have plenty of time so you can just break each topic down and do a little bit of it each day in lots of detail, ensuring you understand everything before going onto the next bit. Textbooks are bad for this - they contain a lot of extra information, the majority of which you don't really need to know and will just slow down your revision.

    Instead, you should get a revision guide, I find the CGP ones to be best, especially for more memory-based subjects like the sciences. Now, other guides on the internet will be able to explain good revision techniques better than me, but essentially just avoid doing nothing but reading the revision guide - this is passive revision, and you won't take in much information, so you'll forget it quickly.

    You should instead do active revision, where you're actively doing something to interact with the content you're learning - such as creating revision cards to test yourself on the content, or writing out the stuff you need to learn in your own words, condensing down the important bits from the revision guide in a way you remember well.

    These things still aren't entirely necessary yet, considering it's only year 10. Try out different revision methods before the mocks, find something that works well. The sooner you develop these good revision techniques, the easier next year will be and remember, year 10 is essentially practice for year 11 - you have lots of time to figure out how to learn best, how the exams work, etc, and whilst it's important to make sure you understand the content you're learning, it isn't necessary to be a master at every subject at this point in time.
    Okay, thank you very much. I will definitely take your advice on board.
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    I made my notes in November last year, and then starting revising in February of this year, I had mocks late February. I'm very glad I did this, but I still cram revise the night before my GCSE exams. Obviously I know the content better but I wish I did more 'last minute' revision like the week before if that makes sense, just to re go over everything. I'd recommend doing past papers from one month before, so you have done them all, but not to do them too early so you have none left
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    I started the weekend before my GCSEs
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    (Original post by pelaitsc45)
    I started the weekend before my GCSEs
    Really? How can you revise so much in such little time then?
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    I started a bit of casual revision at February half term, but honestly only properly started revising at the end of April, a week or two before my Biology exam
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Really? How can you revise so much in such little time then?
    Who said I revised a lot?

    Some subjects I only needed a brief glance at because I could fluke those exams. Like in Geography, I got an A in the mock without any revision. Most of my revision is in English, Science and History, because they do require substantial knowledge.
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    (Original post by pelaitsc45)
    Who said I revised a lot?

    Some subjects I only needed a brief glance at because I could fluke those exams. Like in Geography, I got an A in the mock without any revision. Most of my revision is in English, Science and History, because they do require substantial knowledge.
    Aha yeah, but I meant there is a ton to revise but how could you fit it in all, in such little time. Or maybe when you learn it sticks in your head for a long period of time, therefore it wouldn't take you long to revise at all.

    Well, it takes me about 3 weeks to revise chemistry, biology, and physics.
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    (Original post by Daydreamer3)
    Aha yeah, but I meant there is a ton to revise but how could you fit it in all, in such little time. Or maybe when you learn it sticks in your head for a long period of time, therefore it wouldn't take you long to revise at all.

    Well, it takes me about 3 weeks to revise chemistry, biology, and physics.
    To be honest, I don't fit everything in in great detail, but I manage to look over everything beforehand. I needed a week to revise core science and week to revise additional because I messed around. So it wasn't really revision it more just self teaching :/

    In my other subjects I understood most of the syllabus, so going back over it was fine.

    I'm not saying this is the right way to do it, just what I do. I do wish I started a couple of months before, but procrastination takes over until panic overrides it lol.
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    Going to start in the summer holidays or after 25th june
 
 
 
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