Hey there! Sign in to join this conversationNew here? Join for free
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Yeah Warwick = UCL in terms of prestige among employers but for the average person, they would probably think of UCL as being more prestigious than Warwick- a lot of people do care about that lol
    Maybe.. Depends how you define 'average'.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Maybe.. Depends how you define 'average'.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    By average I mean people who haven't gone to uni or went to a uni that's less prestigious than both of them, like most people's family members.
    Offline

    2
    International reputation is also key. You can point to a few morse grads going to US business schools but I imagine there are more UCL grads in general. Though this is just speculation.

    Beyond that is living in Coventry (lol) vs London. Depends on your financial situation, I guess.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    International reputation is also key. You can point to a few morse grads going to US business schools but I imagine there are more UCL grads in general. Though this is just speculation.

    Beyond that is living in Coventry (lol) vs London. Depends on your financial situation, I guess.
    Indeed.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Indeed.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    I think what's apparent is a reluctance to admit that in terms of 'branding' which is mostly the important thing when selecting a university that UCL is by far the better bet.

    If you have any data showing that Warwick has more US business school alumni than UCL, I'm sure you will have already posted it in evidence that you are making a good decision. Do you have a link to that post? Else, I'll presume you found the contrary and are not willing to admit it.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    OP, both unis and both degrees will get you into derivs trading if you have the right skills and have extracurriculars and prepare for the interview. I would go with UCL since you won't need to pay for accommodation. However, consider applying for Imperial since they also have a very generous bursary scheme which could knock about £2000-3000 off your tuition fees. UCL and Warwick have slightly less generous fees. Keep in mind though that imperial maths is known for being very difficult.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    I think what's apparent is a reluctance to admit that in terms of 'branding' which is mostly the important thing when selecting a university that UCL is by far the better bet.

    If you have any data showing that Warwick has more US business school alumni than UCL, I'm sure you will have already posted it in evidence that you are making a good decision. Do you have a link to that post? Else, I'll presume you found the contrary and are not willing to admit it.
    I wouldn't say 'by far'- and OP isn't going to go to business school anyway so why are you guys arguing about this?
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    But LSE isn't good for maths and Oxbridge maths is really really hard from what I've heard, so OP can't really choose all of them.
    Just because LSE isn't the best uni for maths doesn't mean that "LSE isn't good for maths". It consistently places in the top 10 in maths league tables.

    Regardless, I would rather study maths at LSE than at Warwick/UCL purely because of LSE's overall reputation.

    If I were OP I'd apply to 3 or 4 targets.
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    I wouldn't say 'by far'- and OP isn't going to go to business school anyway so why are you guys arguing about this?
    You don't know that... He wants to get into trading but who knows what he'll want in 3-6 or even 10 years. My only suggestion is UCL has a better international reputation.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by anonwinner)
    Just because LSE isn't the best uni for maths doesn't mean that "LSE isn't good for maths". It consistently places in the top 10 in maths league tables.

    Regardless, I would rather study maths at LSE than at Warwick/UCL purely because of LSE's overall reputation.

    If I were OP I'd apply to 3 or 4 targets.
    Yet the maths professors I know at LSE say they would recommend others go to COWI instead..

    It is pretty well known LSE doesn't have a great Maths course.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    You don't know that... He wants to get into trading but who knows what he'll want in 3-6 or even 10 years. My only suggestion is UCL has a better international reputation.
    Yeah because doing an MBA is going to be so relevant to exotic derivatives trading
    Offline

    2
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    Yeah because doing an MBA issuing to be so relevant to exotic derivatives trading
    He hasn't even gone to uni yet. You nor he nor I know that he will want to do that in 3 years.

    Further, he might want to change career paths. He might want to go check out the US job market. UCL is more flexible.

    This isn't difficult. We're dealing with A Level students here. Stop optimising towards one poxy job. It's ridiculous. Career flexibility is much more useful, especially when we start splitting hairs between two fine choices.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Princepieman)
    Yet the maths professors I know at LSE say they would recommend others go to COWI instead..

    It is pretty well known LSE doesn't have a great Maths course.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    But will it be harder to get into exotics trading if one goes to LSE for maths rather than COWI?
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    I think what's apparent is a reluctance to admit that in terms of 'branding' which is mostly the important thing when selecting a university that UCL is by far the better bet.

    If you have any data showing that Warwick has more US business school alumni than UCL, I'm sure you will have already posted it in evidence that you are making a good decision. Do you have a link to that post? Else, I'll presume you found the contrary and are not willing to admit it.
    The branding difference is hardly significance, nor even present for the most part. I think people forget that opinions are formed on more than just league tables, and my anecdotal (I know, don't bother) experience is that the people 'in the know' abroad (employers, researchers et al) will have heard of UCL and Warwick equally. The two universities don't have the same resounding brand recognition as Oxbridge (mostly Oxford) or LSE, no matter how many league tables you point to.

    I don't have any on me, apart from they're both represented in the 'lists of admitted students' alma maters' stats US b-schools churn out. Maybe try a LinkedIn experiment? L

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    16
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    But OP specifically wants to work in exotic derivatives trading, which requires a good mathematical degree.

    LSE maths is not in the top 10 consistently lol. You cannot deny that UCL and Warwick, along with a lot of the semi targets like Bristol and Nottingham, have better maths departments. The only reason you're saying this is because you applied to LSE
    No, I guess I just value overall reputation more than reputation of a specific department.
    • Thread Starter
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Guys I'm NOT going to business school! It's either trading or (if I can't get in) something in the Big4. I have no interest in IBD or strat consulting or any of that stuff.

    If I were to do a degree after my bachelors, it would be an MSc in maths or financial mathematics.
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    (Original post by BizzStrut)
    He hasn't even gone to uni yet. You nor he nor I know that he will want to do that in 3 years.

    Further, he might want to change career paths. He might want to go check out the US job market. UCL is more flexible.

    This isn't difficult. We're dealing with A Level students here. Stop optimising towards one poxy job. It's ridiculous. Career flexibility is much more useful, especially when we start splitting hairs between two fine choices.
    (Original post by inspiringtop123)
    Guys I'm NOT going to business school! It's either trading or (if I can't get in) something in the Big4. I have no interest in IBD or strat consulting or any of that stuff.

    If I were to do a degree after my bachelors, it would be an MSc in maths or financial mathematics.
    Lol you just got rekt mate
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by Trapz99)
    But will it be harder to get into exotics trading if one goes to LSE for maths rather than COWI?
    Probably not, but there may be a possibility that COWI dev traders might look down on LSE maths. But it's really not that significant, all if these institutions are heavily targeted. It's kind of pointless having this discussion.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
    Offline

    0
    ReputationRep:
    Ultimately UCL features regularly in the top 10 universities in the world hence builiding a very impressive international recognition. It features amongst the ivy league universities and is very difficult to get in for the top courses. Warwick on the other hand fares lower than UCL and is only really recognised for its Maths and Econ departments. It might have a large finance society but at the end of the day its speciality is more in the accounting side of things. In the UK it probably matches the number of people going into high finance but internationally UCL is bound to be better.
    • TSR Support Team
    Offline

    21
    ReputationRep:
    TSR Support Team
    (Original post by foozy)
    Ultimately UCL features regularly in the top 10 universities in the world hence builiding a very impressive international recognition. It features amongst the ivy league universities and is very difficult to get in for the top courses. Warwick on the other hand fares lower than UCL and is only really recognised for its Maths and Econ departments. It might have a large finance society but at the end of the day its speciality is more in the accounting side of things. In the UK it probably matches the number of people going into high finance but internationally UCL is bound to be better.
    All of this is complete and utter, crap.

    In the realm of finance, whether internationally or nationally both universities are fine choices. It's really that simple. All of this debacle about rankings leads nowhere.

    Posted from TSR Mobile
 
 
 
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • Poll
    Has a teacher ever helped you cheat?
    Useful resources

    Articles:

    Guide to investment bankingGuide to consultancy

    Featured recruiter profiles:

    Deutsche Bank logo

    Deutsche Bank is recruiting

    "Thrive in an international banking environment"

    Quick link:

    Unanswered investment banking and consultancy threads

    Groups associated with this forum:

    View associated groups
  • See more of what you like on The Student Room

    You can personalise what you see on TSR. Tell us a little about yourself to get started.

  • The Student Room, Get Revising and Marked by Teachers are trading names of The Student Room Group Ltd.

    Register Number: 04666380 (England and Wales), VAT No. 806 8067 22 Registered Office: International House, Queens Road, Brighton, BN1 3XE

    Write a reply...
    Reply
    Hide
    Reputation gems: You get these gems as you gain rep from other members for making good contributions and giving helpful advice.