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OCR Classics Comic Drama in the Ancient World Watch

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    (Original post by Sophiestudies)
    That was probably a wise decision! I saw the thing about Philocomasium and panicked because that is by far her most memorable scene! I did the same one as you, but all I really said was that for a modern audience the inclusion of slaves and courtesans would be weird, and we wouldn't understand their stereotypes. My friend also wrote about how they were travelling shows, and so were supposed to appeal to everyone and not just to a single audience like the Athenian one.


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    I just divided it into all all the themes of the play, so like war; religion; women and then a point about not knowing all the famous people if you don't know the etiological links you'd lose some of my the more subtle effect, like Artemesia and Timon. The only thing I had for Plautus was the Roman attitude to the lewd jokes and how our society is accustomed to violence and rudeness like Aristophanes, and unless you knew that the Romans didn't like that type of comedy, you'd perhaps not understand the humour. But I am not sure if that's perhaps too subjective for the essay.
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    (Original post by PLJohn)
    I just divided it into all all the themes of the play, so like war; religion; women and then a point about not knowing all the famous people if you don't know the etiological links you'd lose some of my the more subtle effect, like Artemesia and Timon. The only thing I had for Plautus was the Roman attitude to the lewd jokes and how our society is accustomed to violence and rudeness like Aristophanes, and unless you knew that the Romans didn't like that type of comedy, you'd perhaps not understand the humour. But I am not sure if that's perhaps too subjective for the essay.
    Sounds really good!! I wrote similar things for Aristophanes, but that seems like a really good answer for Plautus!


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    (Original post by Sophiestudies)
    Sounds really good!! I wrote similar things for Aristophanes, but that seems like a really good answer for Plautus!


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    How many marks do you reckon I will lose because I forgot to address the 'is it more important in Aristophanes or Plautus' thing in my conclusion? I looked at the mark scheme and it's all in levels, so I could lose loads of marks for not actually addressing the question I think?
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    (Original post by PLJohn)
    How many marks do you reckon I will lose because I forgot to address the 'is it more important in Aristophanes or Plautus' thing in my conclusion? I looked at the mark scheme and it's all in levels, so I could lose loads of marks for not actually addressing the question I think?
    I'm no examiner but i think it probably depends if you addressed the question at all. Did you mention it in your introduction, or say anything like 'It would be harder for an audience watching Aristophanes...' or something?
    Style and this kind of thing do matter in the big essays but so do lots of detail and close knowledge and understanding of the text, so hopefully you should be okay! You probably made some comparison within your essay even if you didn't think about it.
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    Hey guys- can anyone remember what the actual question was for Lysistrata part a?


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    (Original post by Sophiestudies)
    Hey guys- can anyone remember what the actual question was for Lysistrata part a?


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    Something along the lines of "In Lysistrata, men and women have completely opposing attitudes to war and politics. Using this passage as a starting point, to what extent is this true?"

    xoxo your fave btw I'm starting to really like the Aeneid but the Iliad will always rule my heart
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    (Original post by tiddlyoo)
    Something along the lines of "In Lysistrata, men and women have completely opposing attitudes to war and politics. Using this passage as a starting point, to what extent is this true?"

    xoxo your fave btw I'm starting to really like the Aeneid but the Iliad will always rule my heart
    Thank you so much!!


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    (Original post by Sophiestudies)
    Yeah same! I think it made sense I'm just not sure whether I wrote the right answers! Did you do Lysistrata too? (Although to be honest both questions were different from the usual and asked the passage and the rest for part a)
    I thought the essays were fine although you never know with those


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    yeah exactly, its so hard to know what they want! Yeah I did the Lysistrata passage and the stereotype essay question. You just never know !
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    Does anyone have any examplar material for this section, or any links to some? I can't find any, it would mean a lot
 
 
 
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