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    (Original post by G.S.G)
    In my personal experience this year and last doing Edexcel it's just so much head ache, to give some context i do Business too which I'd recommend over Economics due to the enjoyment and you'd still be doing some economics just more in a finance and business context. Economics is just a lot to learn and exams drains the fun out of the subject 101% Will also be the sole reason I don't get into my Firm Uni (if i don't )
    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    sorry to hear about that
    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    what do you want to be in the future? i wanted to do computing too but the school i want to go to only allows you to take 3 subjects.

    I would also start by saying sorry about grammar and spelling I dont really care about that when posting. I just type really quickly. Why can't you take four? I would get my parents involved... All top sixth forms and colleges allow 4 even up to 5 which brings me to my next point. I really recommend you go to a good sixth form where there is a strong work ethic because you will have loads of free time and in bad sixth forms it's hard getting good grades becuase the rest of the sixth pulls you down. That is just my opinion but I could have gone to a grammar school, I didn't and I now regret it because while I did above average in my school I got mediocre grades. If I got above average in a Grammar school I would probably got ABBC minimum.

    I also took business much easier than economics however economics is more fun if you really understand it
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    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    I have done Economics at AS and Maths at A2.

    With regards to starting in the summer I honestly think there is no need if you are an A grade student however I just noticed you want to do Further maths too so idk I would look at FP1 in the summer as it is quite different from maths you will be used to such as imaginery numbers and matrices. I am looking to pick up further mathematics have you done a further maths in GCSE? I think if you practicse as you go along and do past papers you should be fine. IMHO people fail A-Levels when they are unmotivated to study, Choose subjects only because they want to sound smart (I am guilty of this and other things as well lol) and for most people when thye let the work compound and lie themselves and end up panicking and they sink. I think you can do well and all of those subjects are really fun especially if you are good at them and you will be good if you are disciplined and dont make mistakes mentioned above) Economics is really fun and I would recommend reading the news when you do it as questions appear e.g crossrail, help to buy, student fees all came up when they were in the news.

    In the summer I recommend you doing some volunteering, get experience in a field you are interested in, get a part-time job perphaps, do some light reading and a bit of further maths just my opinion. You should also relax and not burn yourself out everything is good in moderation. Apart from some thing e.g Drugs lol
    thank you sooo much for your advice!! i will take it into consideration!
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    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    I would also start by saying sorry about grammar and spelling I dont really care about that when posting. I just type really quickly. Why can't you take four? I would get my parents involved... All top sixth forms and colleges allow 4 even up to 5 which brings me to my next point. I really recommend you go to a good sixth form where there is a strong work ethic because you will have loads of free time and in bad sixth forms it's hard getting good grades becuase the rest of the sixth pulls you down. That is just my opinion but I could have gone to a grammar school, I didn't and I now regret it because while I did above average in my school I got mediocre grades. If I got above average in a Grammar school I would probably got ABBC minimum.

    I also took business much easier than economics however economics is more fun if you really understand it
    5 is little overkill considering only 3 matter for most universities and even for Oxbridge would be 4. As for Grammar schools that really depends on your style of learning, some may not be as responsive to a grammar school style.
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Same with me. all i know is that i want to be a programmer who is a CEO of a large company!
    Wish i had your ambition!
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    (Original post by EnterNamehereplz)
    I would also start by saying sorry about grammar and spelling I dont really care about that when posting. I just type really quickly. Why can't you take four? I would get my parents involved... All top sixth forms and colleges allow 4 even up to 5 which brings me to my next point. I really recommend you go to a good sixth form where there is a strong work ethic because you will have loads of free time and in bad sixth forms it's hard getting good grades becuase the rest of the sixth pulls you down. That is just my opinion but I could have gone to a grammar school, I didn't and I now regret it because while I did above average in my school I got mediocre grades. If I got above average in a Grammar school I would probably got ABBC minimum.

    I also took business much easier than economics however economics is more fun if you really understand it
    the reason why is because of the new A-level structure being put into place concerning year 11 students doing 3 A-levels for 2 years straight (however some sixth forms continue with the process many people know: take 4 or 5 subjects and possibly drop one for A2). i will not be doing AS's because this new structure no longer considers it as a separate qualification, but instead will have qualifications at the end of 2 years which represent what we would know to be AS and A2 now.
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    (Original post by xxFreyaWxx)
    Wish i had your ambition!
    Lool. im currently learning Java Script, Python and HTML. do you learn any programming languages currently?
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    do you have to have done GCSE economics in order to understand what is taught at the beginning of AS?
    I didnt do GCSE economics so idk whats in GCSE economics
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Lool. im currently learning Java Script, Python and HTML. do you learn any programming languages currently?
    Just python but i want to learn another in the summer.
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Lool. im currently learning Java Script, Python and HTML. do you learn any programming languages currently?
    Why did you choosse further maths/ economics over computing?
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    (Original post by xxFreyaWxx)
    Just python but i want to learn another in the summer.
    i recommend learning HTML. its really simple and quick to learn, easier than python tbh. are you doing any work experience or internships this summer?
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    i recommend learning HTML. its really simple and quick to learn, easier than python tbh. are you doing any work experience or internships this summer?
    Okay, ill probs learn html, thanks no, i would have liked to but im on holiday pretty much all summer wbu?
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    I will be taking Maths, Further Maths and Economics at A-level next academic year. Does anyone take those subjects or hopes to next academic year like me?
    I am gonna do maths, further maths, economics and history this year hopefully!
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Hi,
    I'm quite good at Maths but i know the jump from GCSE to A-level in terms of difficulty will be BIG. Do you think i should send time doing revision this coming summer on those subjects or should i wait until Sept? What do you aspire to be in the future and what course will you take at uni if you decide to go?
    Firstly, the jump from GCSE to A-Level MATHS is massive if you're algebra isn't great. Every single module involves algebra at A-Level, even statistics. But to be honest, due to the changes in the GCSE spec in the last few years, I think the step up has been reduced. The first module you'll do in maths is C1, which is the easiest exam you'll ever do if you are good at algebra. The step-up comes in C2, where the level of understanding really does increase. But if you do statistics, the jump isn't very big until the last couple of topics: the normal distribution and discrete random variables. You still do the mean, median and mode; quartiles; box plots, histograms; correlation which is just plugging numbers into a formula. So statistics isn't very hard if this is your AS option for MATHS. You do C1 C2 and either S1 (Stats) M1 (mechanics i.e. physics) or D1 (descision - algorithms). Then again, someone could do D1 without doing A-level Maths, it is the only set of maths that does not depend on any other module.

    Further Maths - This is where you will notice the jump straight away. You are likely to start with either M1 or FP1. M1 is mechanics which is the maths physics applicants will do in their first year of university (but they will probably do one or two lectures on this module, so don't look at it as a university module). Mechanics hit me quite hard first of all, as you will never have done anything like this before unless you've looked ahead to A-Level. But, it is very logical, and the theory is very easy to undestand for this reason, the method is where you may have problems. BUT, with time, you will understand it easily. Forces is where it first starts to pick up the pace. Now FP1, this is probably the module that contains the best maths at AS if you like algebra. I love mechanics, but FP1 is awesome. You start off with perfecting GCSE algebra and then you do complex numbers, which is quite an abstract concept as you deal with imaginary numbers. But then you do stuff like matrices and parametric equations which are very useful for normal maths like C1 and C2. But FP1 contains the most intuitive topic in AS maths in my opinion, proof by induction. So I wouldn't say FP1 is too difficult until you do parametrics and proof by induction, it just follows on from C1 and C2.

    If I have learnt anything from doing these two subjects at A-Level, it's that the further maths will take the pressure off normal maths. You will come into a maths lesson and just automatically relax . I would see it as double maths and not further maths, you're just doing more maths which is why you will improve quickly as you're simply doing more of it. It also made physics a lot easier for me but this depends on how similar M1 and your physics course is. The main way to succeed, is just to keep up with the work. This is how I feel a lot of students fail as they cannot deal with the workload. If you stay on top of the work, you are likely to do well. On the whole, some modules will step up, some won't. If you've done Further maths at GCSE, then normal maths is a piece of cake. But the main thing I would encourage is to be comitted. Also, from doing further maths, you are likely to come across topics in normal maths sooner, which is the main reason your normal maths lessons will seem like a breeze.

    As for A2 maths, you will do C3 and C4 which are just harder versions of C1 and C2. Then you will do another applied module, which could be anything from M1-M2, S1-S2 or D1-D2 depending on your AS maths options and what you're doing in further maths. I didn't expect A2 to be much harder, but it is. It does step up, but the jump is no where near as big as GCSE to AS. The only real difference is that instead of a question taking 4 or 5 lines for 7 marks, it now takes a page. So the time you spend on maths and further maths becomes a lot more similar at A2, whereas AS maths took me like 30 mins to do a whole excercise, whereas further maths could take anywhere from 30 mins to two hours.

    Your further maths A Level will be as hard as your options are. I Would say that if you do more mechanics than stats or descsion, then your Further maths will be difficult. Then if you do FP1 - FP3 you will literally have done the hardest algebra until you get to university. But I wouldn't say FP2 is that bad really, it just builds on C4. FP3 is where you will meet new concepts again. FP3 is up there with the hardest A Level maths modules. S2-S3 are probably about the same difficulty, if anything S3 is easier. D2 is pretty much as easy as D1. S4 is slightly harder than S3. But FP2, FP3 and M3-M5 are probably the hardest modules in A2 maths.

    However, I stress that these are my opinions from my experiences. Someone else may have had a completely different experience. You may find A Level maths and further maths very difficult, or a walk in the park. Mechanics could be the easiest module you have ever done if you're mechanically minded, it depends on the person. However, I would say that apart from Physics, Maths and Further maths are the hardest A-levels you can take. Simply because they become the most abstract, you study topics which have no relevant application in our world yet, whereas I would argue that doing a subject like History is easier because you can apply it to the real word more easily. Not to say anything against someone who does history, I personally couldn't have dealt with the amount of reading you have to do.

    All in all, maths and further maths will definitely help with your economics, and are fantastic to have in your locker. I would think the statistics modules will help the most with economics, maybe it would be good to do something like geography with it as well? I don't know. There is a lot of theory in economics that does not rely on mathematical understanding so doing something with more qualitative like geography or history may help as well. I do not want to commentt oo much on economics as I haven't personally studied it. I can answer small questions on it but thats about it.

    I will be studying Physics at Sussex university next year as I'm taking a gap year working as a teaching assistant. I hold an unconditional offer from them for physics with research placement (MPHYS whichs includes a masters degree hence the M) so my place is confirmed regardless of my grades. But if I got UUU, I'm sure they wouldn't be happy. I wish to complete a PhD in particle physics after university but I am in a band and would love to be a musician if we got lucky. Personal advice for AS is to smash that year, the higher grades you get in your first year, the more likely you are to get an unconditional offer (My offer would be A*AA if I did'nt get an unconditional) which really takes the pressure off your final exams. Although I still want to get 3 A*s in Maths Further Maths and physics for personal achivement as I feel that is my potential. So even though I don't need to ace my A2s to go to uni, I still want to.

    Hope this helps

    Hope this helps.
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    (Original post by xxFreyaWxx)
    Okay, ill probs learn html, thanks no, i would have liked to but im on holiday pretty much all summer wbu?
    im going on holiday around the end of summer but before then i really want to find a place where i can do some work experience
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Hi,
    I'm quite good at Maths but i know the jump from GCSE to A-level in terms of difficulty will be BIG. Do you think i should send time doing revision this coming summer on those subjects or should i wait until Sept? What do you aspire to be in the future and what course will you take at uni if you decide to go?
    Sorry I didnt answer your question fully. I would look at a bit of C1 and C2 if you aren't very confident with your GCSE algebra. However, my first two weeks of A2 were a GCSE algebra recap so you're not expected to do this. If you like maths then do a little bit, but to be honest, the thing I regret is not having enough time off from my A-levels in the last two years. I would take full advantage of the summer and come back fresh, as the next two years will be very full on and if you ho straight to university, you have a minimum of 5 years of straight work.
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    Ive heard that Further Maths is really, really hard, even if you are very good at GCSE Maths. Is this true? if so then why?
    I've only done maths A level so far (nothing from the FM spec) but it is definitely a big step up from GCSE. A major difference is the increase in workload - I have 6 maths exams, each 90mins long, this summer!!

    As to why it is harder than GCSE? Because it's so so so different. The first month in September will feel alien to you - at least it did to me & most of my FM class. You will soon get used to the increased work load however and by October, it should not feel too bad.

    As soon as you get to grips with the basics of differentiation and integration, the modules should become progressively more enjoyable. I found C1 by far the most boring but C4 was really interesting because it was significantly harder and more challenging. You'll quickly learn that basic maths is now just assumed knowledge - you will not get marks in an A level paper for every single calculation you do!
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    (Original post by kennz)
    Sorry I didnt answer your question fully. I would look at a bit of C1 and C2 if you aren't very confident with your GCSE algebra. However, my first two weeks of A2 were a GCSE algebra recap so you're not expected to do this. If you like maths then do a little bit, but to be honest, the thing I regret is not having enough time off from my A-levels in the last two years. I would take full advantage of the summer and come back fresh, as the next two years will be very full on and if you ho straight to university, you have a minimum of 5 years of straight work.
    thank you soooooooooo much for taking the time to reply! you basically answered my questions concerning those subjects in a nutshell! congratz on your offer by the way!!
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    (Original post by 98matt)
    I've only done maths A level so far (nothing from the FM spec) but it is definitely a big step up from GCSE. A major difference is the increase in workload - I have 6 maths exams, each 90mins long, this summer!!

    As to why it is harder than GCSE? Because it's so so so different. The first month in September will feel alien to you - at least it did to me & most of my FM class. You will soon get used to the increased work load however and by October, it should not feel too bad.

    As soon as you get to grips with the basics of differentiation and integration, the modules should become progressively more enjoyable. I found C1 by far the most boring but C4 was really interesting because it was significantly harder and more challenging. You'll quickly learn that basic maths is now just assumed knowledge - you will not get marks in an A level paper for every single calculation you do!
    thank you!!
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    (Original post by amxnda_ldn)
    thank you soooooooooo much for taking the time to reply! you basically answered my questions concerning those subjects in a nutshell! congratz on your offer by the way!!
    No problem, glad it helped and thank you. Good luck with your A-Levels
 
 
 
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